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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) on Friday recommended a strategy shift in America's efforts to erase its huge disadvantage in trade dealings with Japan. Rather than negotiate directly with the governmental hierarchy in Tokyo to correct unfair trade practices, Gephardt called for tough countermeasures that would ultimately lead the Japanese people to demand reforms from their own government. Gephardt, a key congressional proponent of aggressive U.S.
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WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Elections on Sunday are expected to return former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe to power, a hawk by the standards of restrained Japan. The nation's apparent rightward swing has spurred concerns that a victorious Abe might attempt one of his most controversial quests: undoing Japan's constitutional ban on waging war. Predictions that Abe and his right-wing party will win are a result of the Japanese right profiting politically from disillusionment with...
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HEALTH
March 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
First a massive earthquake and a devastating tsunami. Now a battle with an out-of-control nuclear reactor facility. How much can one people take? Though there's obviously a limit to what anyone can bear, cultural features of a society can clearly influence psychological resilience, experts say. As the tragedy drags into a second week, they warn that prolonged stress will lead to heightened trauma for many Japanese people and that levels of sadness...
WORLD
November 27, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
As Japan grapples with its neighbors over contested islands, Japanese goodwill toward China and South Korea has hit record lows, a new government survey has found. Disputes over the Senkaku and Takeshima islands -- known by other names to China and South Korea -- has already taken an economic toll, helping drag down Japanese exports to their lowest point since the economic slowdown three years ago, Bloomberg News reported last week. Shipments to China, the biggest market for Japanese exports, slumped 11.6%.
BOOKS
October 30, 1994
Japanese writer Kenzaburo Oe was named winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize for Literature. The spotlight of the prestigious award always raises the question of a writer's "representativeness." Several years ago, Oe met with Japanese-born writer Kazuo Ishiguro (author of "Remains of the Day," among other novels), who was raised in England and has written about both England and Japan.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his sixth month in office, Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi is trying to rescue a moribund economy, mend tense relations with China and South Korea, and stamp out persistent corruption. But he's a player in a far more personal drama as well. Koizumi's 18-year-old son, Yoshinaga Miyamoto, longs to see his politician father, a man he has never met. The closest he has come was at a rally a few months ago, when he managed to get within about a dozen yards.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1985
What Ansel Adams saw at Manzanar was the beauty of the Japanese people, their dignity, their honor in the face of hardship and turmoil ("Ansel Adams' Photos: 40 Years of Controversy," by Diana Mar, July 28). Adams should not be faulted for his vision, for it graced every image that he made. The courage shown by the Japanese-Americans interned should be remembered by every American with pride. VICTORIA J. FISHER Panorama City
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Nearly 1,000 people sued the government today to block the use of $58.8 million in public funds for the enthronement rites of Emperor Akihito in November. "We believe the use of our tax money for ceremonies that have strong religious links goes against the constitutional separation of politics and religion," said Masato Kotani, an organizer of the lawsuit involving 987 plaintiffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1993
"Group Takes 'Rising Sun' Protest Public" (April 7) reads: "A coalition of Asian-Americans is disavowing the movie adaptation of Michael Crichton's politically charged thriller 'Rising Sun' because the producing studio refuses to include a disclaimer asking audiences not to assume 'all Japanese people are trying to take over America.' " Presumably we can say, "Movies are only fiction" or "We have freedom of expression" to create controversy to sell more newspapers. The Holocaust is a reminder how dangerous it is to reinforce people's fear--about certain groups of people, race or religion.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2008 | Kate Kraft
The nomination of Barack Obama isn't just America's story. More than 2,000 foreign journalists flocked to Denver to cover the Democratic National Convention. The reason for the foreign fascination? In part, it's the drama of American democracy. "Japanese people are more interested in this election than in domestic elections," said Fumitaka Susami, a political correspondent with Japanese news agency Kyodo News, which sent 23 staffers to Denver. "The ruling party in Japan [has been]
HEALTH
March 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
First a massive earthquake and a devastating tsunami. Now a battle with an out-of-control nuclear reactor facility. How much can one people take? Though there's obviously a limit to what anyone can bear, cultural features of a society can clearly influence psychological resilience, experts say. As the tragedy drags into a second week, they warn that prolonged stress will lead to heightened trauma for many Japanese people and that levels of sadness...
NATIONAL
March 11, 2011 | From the White House
President Obama issued this statement upon hearing of the massive earthquake off Japan: "Michelle and I send our deepest condolences to the people of Japan, particularly those who have lost loved ones in the earthquake and tsunamis. "The United States stands ready to help the Japanese people in this time of great trial. The friendship and alliance between our two nations is unshakable, and only strengthens our resolve to stand with the people of Japan as they overcome this tragedy.
FOOD
December 30, 2009 | By Sonoko Sakai
When I go back to Japan, some people assume that I head straight for sushi bars. But my favorite pastime is making pilgrimages to artisanal soba shops. If there is one food I love with a passion, it is soba, the thin, earthy-looking buckwheat noodles. I enjoy their natural sweet flavor and nutty aroma and eat them for lunch three or four times a week, and sometimes for dinner too. I'm not the only one who places soba on such a high pedestal. "Soba is the best Japanese food there is," my friend Noritoshi Kanai said to me the other day. An active 86 years, he has a breakfast ritual that consists of a bowl of soba seven days a week, surpassing even my soba consumption.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2008 | Kate Kraft
The nomination of Barack Obama isn't just America's story. More than 2,000 foreign journalists flocked to Denver to cover the Democratic National Convention. The reason for the foreign fascination? In part, it's the drama of American democracy. "Japanese people are more interested in this election than in domestic elections," said Fumitaka Susami, a political correspondent with Japanese news agency Kyodo News, which sent 23 staffers to Denver. "The ruling party in Japan [has been]
OPINION
March 11, 2007
Re "The shame Japan can't dodge," Opinion, March 6 Let me set the record straight. In 1993, the government of Japan acknowledged the involvement of former Japanese military authorities in the "comfort women" issue and expressed apologies and remorse to those who endured immeasurable pain and incurable wounds. In 1995, the Asian Women's Fund, which extended payments to women as a form of atonement and implemented medical and welfare projects, was established with the cooperation of the government and the Japanese people.
OPINION
April 18, 2005
The article, "Japan's Revisionist History" by Philip J. Cunningham (Commentary, April 11), displays a lack of understanding of the process by which Japanese textbooks are screened and approved and the position of the Japanese government in facing the past squarely. He points out: "That tacit government approval is given to such xenophobic, right-wing thinking can be seen in the latest Ministry of Education-approved school texts that erase or evade critical lessons drawn from Japan's bad behavior in its war of aggression."
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2003 | David Colker
Hidden behind the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center downtown is a serene, beautifully maintained garden with paths that wind through stalks of bamboo, rare pine trees, azaleas and ferns. They lead over wooden bridges, past stone lanterns and moss-covered stones. The garden is a lovely respite from city life. But it's also a reminder of the struggles of immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994
Thanks for your Aug. 17 editorial, "The Prime Minister (Murayama) Says No to Denial." A few thoughts: Wouldn't there be a huge outcry if Germans wept at Hitler's tomb? Why is there no protest over the Japanese, who mourn at Tojo's grave, in their annual outpouring of grief at the Yasukuni Shrine? The arrogance of Japanese officials denying guilt over World War II is stupefying. Now we see a glimmer of regret in Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama calling for a resolution of remorse in 1995.
OPINION
September 18, 2004
Re "Internment Lesson Plan Is Under Attack," Sept. 12: U.S. citizens of Japanese descent were interned based solely on their ancestry. Their Asian ancestry. We were also at war with Germany and Italy. We did not do a wholesale roundup of people of German and Italian ancestry and put them in "camps." The entire episode smacks of the racism that it was. Our government methodically stole the pride of our citizens of Japanese ancestry. We then proceeded to steal their property, businesses and bank accounts.
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2003 | David Colker
Hidden behind the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center downtown is a serene, beautifully maintained garden with paths that wind through stalks of bamboo, rare pine trees, azaleas and ferns. They lead over wooden bridges, past stone lanterns and moss-covered stones. The garden is a lovely respite from city life. But it's also a reminder of the struggles of immigrants.
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