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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1990
Why can't America catch up (Part A, Jan. 14)? We could if we were given the same business opportunities in Japan as we give the Japanese here in the United States. We could if Japan would let American businessmen have Japanese lobbyists pounding on the doors of their politicians in Tokyo. We could if American patents would protect the American manufacturer in Japan. We could if American businesses would get full government support for plant improvements to beat the foreign competition.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2011
DETROIT — The effect of the Japanese crisis on the U.S. economy is far greater than realized, a top trade group said. American companies and industries rely heavily on Japanese-made automotive products and high-tech electronics, but the U.S. Business and Industry Council said in a report released Wednesday that there was an even greater dependence on less well-known Japanese products. These include industrial equipment like machine tools and energy-generating turbines. In 2009, Japan accounted for about 15% of the turbines for generating energy sold in the U.S., up more than 2,000% from 1997, according to the council.
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REAL ESTATE
September 15, 1985
U. C. M., which markets and distributes three brands of Japanese products nationwide, has leased and occupied the 55,516-square-foot industrial building at 19300 Susanna Road, Compton, for about $1 million. Both the lessee and the lessor, Ronald H. Bloom of Beverly Hills, were represented by the Seeley Co.
HEALTH
March 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan and Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Japan halted some food shipments Monday as officials from the World Health Organization warned that radioactive milk, spinach and other items posed a greater health threat than radioactive materials in the air. Tainted agricultural products turned up over the weekend, with some exceeding government standards for allowable radiation levels. Here's some information on radiation and food safety: How does food become tainted by radiation? Plants can become poisoned when radioactive material enters the soil and is taken up by root systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
Alice Uchi slowly pushed a near-empty shopping cart down the near-empty aisles flanked by near-empty shelves in what had been the first and largest modern Japanese supermarket in Little Tokyo. "I feel lost. Sad," the retired Los Angeles registered nurse said glumly. Uchi was catching the tail end of Mitsuwa Marketplace's 50% fire sale before it prepares Sunday to shut its doors, marking an emotional transition for many in Little Tokyo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Regarding the letter "Japanese Products" (Feb. 8), I take exception only with (Hendrik) Gillebaard's last sentence: "They are buying the best lobbyists in Washington to be sure they can continue to rape America." I think when a prostitute sells herself, the act is not considered rape. JUDITH VIESCAS Seal Beach
MAGAZINE
January 18, 1987
There were some glaring omissions from the article on ethnic markets. You provided no listing of: Indian markets, of which we have many and which are good, inexpensive sources of spices; the Holland-American market in Bellflower, one of the largest in Southern California for both Dutch and Indonesian items; or the New Meiji in Gardena, one of the largest in the Los Angeles area for Japanese products. Anna L. Karklyn Santa Monica
NEWS
August 11, 1986 | United Press International
Japan posted a record monthly trade surplus of $8.22 billion in July, shattering any prospect of a quick reversal in its top-heavy trading account despite the steep appreciation of the yen that makes Japanese products more expensive abroad, the Finance Ministry said today. The ministry figures also showed that Japan's exports to the United States jumped 28.5% last month from a year ago to a record $7.48 billion.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1986
The $8.22-billion surplus for July came despite the steep appreciation in the value of the yen that makes Japanese products more expensive abroad, the Finance Ministry said. The ministry figures also showed that Japan's exports to the United States jumped 28.5% last month from a year ago to a record $7.48 billion, surpassing the previous high of $7.02 billion set in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1986
What no one seems to realize is that Premier Nakasone's comments about American Hispanic and black intellectual inferiority could be a blessing in disguise. Look, we have a dangerously draining trade deficit with the Japanese, right? And so far, devaluing the dollar in relation to the yen and encouraging the Japanese to buy American have had little effect. The huge deficits remain. But now Nakasone makes his comments and Jesse Jackson plus a bunch of Latino politicians say they're going to get their people to boycott Japanese products.
FOOD
April 15, 2010 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As Soichi Sayano pulls open the metal drying-room door, a breeze sends ripples down the curtain-like wall of 10-foot-long udon noodles neatly folded over metal drying racks. "I still cut the noodles every day," says the 75-year-old former aerothermodynamics engineer who took over his father's noodle-making duties at Nanka Seimen more than 30 years ago. Little has changed in the flour-dusted drying room since the Japanese noodle factory's founder, Masakichi Tokunaga, handed the front door keys to Sayano's father — an employee at Nanka Seimen during World War II. Elsewhere in the Vernon-based factory, that powdery residue covers state-of-the-art Japanese noodle and wonton manufacturing equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
Alice Uchi slowly pushed a near-empty shopping cart down the near-empty aisles flanked by near-empty shelves in what had been the first and largest modern Japanese supermarket in Little Tokyo. "I feel lost. Sad," the retired Los Angeles registered nurse said glumly. Uchi was catching the tail end of Mitsuwa Marketplace's 50% fire sale before it prepares Sunday to shut its doors, marking an emotional transition for many in Little Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2004 | Christine N. Ziemba
Not counting dangling participles or comma splices, many Americans butcher the English language. Misspellings and malapropisms are everywhere: Notice restaurant signage that boasts "fine dinning" or check out the "Headlines" segment on "The Tonight Show," where Jay Leno pokes fun at mistakes that slipped past copy editors. We're equally bemused by the fanciful way English is used in other countries. The website www.engrish.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Japanese factory production fell for the first time in five months in June, a sign the recovery may slow as the U.S. economy cools and the rising yen makes it harder for exporters to compete with overseas rivals. Production fell 0.7% from May, seasonally adjusted, the government said. Economists expected a 0.5% decline. A 4.1% rise in May fueled a 3.6% gain last quarter, the biggest quarterly increase in 15 years. Sony Corp. and Fujitsu Ltd.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1999 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Production of both animated features and television series in the U.S. has reached record levels, but that output is still dwarfed by the staggering volume of work turned out by Japanese studios. Americans' growing hunger for Japanese animation, usually referred to as anime (AH-nee-may), was evident over the weekend at the Anime Expo in Anaheim.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, This story was reported by Times staff writers Donald W. Nauss in Detroit, Jill Leovy in the San Fernando Valley, Ross Kerber in Orange County and Nancy Rivera Brooks in Los Angeles. It was written by Nauss
Steve Shuken makes a nice living at his Vista Lexus dealership in Woodland Hills, selling about 750 luxury automobiles a year. But he is worried that his days on cruise control may be coming to an end. He is hopeful that the 100% tariffs on Japanese luxury cars proposed Tuesday by the Clinton Administration are merely a gesture of international bravura that won't threaten the future of his $40-million-a-year business.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone said today that the steep U.S. penalty tariffs on selected Japanese products are regrettable but may have provided a "good lesson" for Japanese and Americans alike, a Foreign Ministry official said. The official said Nakasone was responding to U.S. trade representative Clayton K. Yeutter, who told the prime minister that his office had been inundated with phone calls from congressmen asking that certain Japanese goods be excluded from the duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2004 | Christine N. Ziemba
Not counting dangling participles or comma splices, many Americans butcher the English language. Misspellings and malapropisms are everywhere: Notice restaurant signage that boasts "fine dinning" or check out the "Headlines" segment on "The Tonight Show," where Jay Leno pokes fun at mistakes that slipped past copy editors. We're equally bemused by the fanciful way English is used in other countries. The website www.engrish.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration, turning up the pressure on Japan, today will announce a list of Japanese products that will be hit with punitive tariffs unless agreement is reached in a bitter trade fight involving automobiles. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor scheduled a morning news conference to unveil the list of proposed sanctions. Congressional and industry sources say they expect the list to cover about $6 billion worth of products, focusing on luxury cars.
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