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September 7, 1988 | Associated Press
Part of the U.S. Olympic track and field team arrived Tuesday at its Japanese training base under heavy security. The security measures began when the team left its Los Angeles hotel on Monday. The team received a police escort from the hotel to Los Angeles International Airport and instead of being dropped at the normal departure gate, the party of 50 athletes and staff personnel was driven across the tarmac and escorted in a back door. "It cuts down on crowds," said Alan Gowing of the U.S.
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NEWS
May 7, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Peruvian government's probe of an alleged security breakdown that preceded an 18-week hostage siege in Lima took an unexpected turn Tuesday with the news that one of the 19 police commanders under investigation has left the country. Lt. Gen. Luis Malasquez of the national police was in Mexico on Tuesday, according to his daughter, Juliana. Malasquez is charged with negligence in connection with the siege at the Japanese ambassador's residence.
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NEWS
April 19, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton concluded a three-day summit Thursday that celebrated U.S.-Japanese friendship and strengthened security ties, then flew to St. Petersburg, Russia, for an eight-nation conference on nuclear safeguards. With long-running trade disputes pushed firmly into the background, the Tokyo summit ended in a rosy glow.
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton concluded a three-day summit Thursday that celebrated U.S.-Japanese friendship and strengthened security ties, then flew to St. Petersburg, Russia, for an eight-nation conference on nuclear safeguards. With long-running trade disputes pushed firmly into the background, the Tokyo summit ended in a rosy glow.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Peruvian government's probe of an alleged security breakdown that preceded an 18-week hostage siege in Lima took an unexpected turn Tuesday with the news that one of the 19 police commanders under investigation has left the country. Lt. Gen. Luis Malasquez of the national police was in Mexico on Tuesday, according to his daughter, Juliana. Malasquez is charged with negligence in connection with the siege at the Japanese ambassador's residence.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a troubling indicator of this nation's rise as a global economic power, more and more Japanese businessmen, aid workers and tourists are becoming targets of international terrorists and criminals. This year alone, 17 Japanese have been murdered in Guam, the Dominican Republic, Thailand, Panama, Colombia, China, Pakistan, Saipan and the United States.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | Associated Press
More than 10 Japanese securities companies are being investigated for allegedly compensating favored customers for 16 billion yen, or $107 million, in losses after the 1987 stock market crash, major Japanese newspapers reported today. The reports, which came out in the early afternoon, had a major impact on Tokyo currency and stock markets, stimulating a fall in both the yen and in share prices. The dollar closed higher at 150.11 yen, up 0.98 yen from Wednesday's finish of 149.13 yen.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1990 | from Associated Press
Yamaichi Securities, one of Japan's 17 major securities companies, said today it faces a loss of $24 million due to one customer's bankruptcy last month. Yamaichi, on orders from the customer in February, bought 3 million shares--or one-seventh of the total outstanding--of Nippon Seisen, a leading wire maker, at the equivalent of about $44 million for delivery in four days.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a legal tangle that may shed some light on the shadowy world of the Japanese securities industry, giant Nomura Securities Co. is threatening to file a libel suit in a London court next week against an American author who detailed the company's alleged involvement in unethical business dealings.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nomura Securities Co., the world's largest securities brokerage and a symbol of Japan's new global financial power, filed suit for libel in a London court Wednesday against an American author who alleged that the company has been involved in insider trading and other securities violations in Japan. A lawyer representing Nomura said the company alleges that it has been defamed by Albert J. Alletzhauser, a London-based financier and former stock salesman in Tokyo who wrote "The House of Nomura."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1995 | From Reuters
An investment company owner from Irvine and a former U.S. Justice Department official have been convicted of charges stemming from the sale of $400 million worth of counterfeit Japanese government bonds, prosecutors said. In a verdict returned late Thursday, a Tampa federal court jury found B. J. Bravender Ah Loo guilty on 10 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud, securities fraud, money laundering, wire fraud and passing counterfeit Japanese bonds. Norbert A.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a troubling indicator of this nation's rise as a global economic power, more and more Japanese businessmen, aid workers and tourists are becoming targets of international terrorists and criminals. This year alone, 17 Japanese have been murdered in Guam, the Dominican Republic, Thailand, Panama, Colombia, China, Pakistan, Saipan and the United States.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what they said was an effort to "win back trust," Japan's big brokerages agreed Monday to release a list of customers who received compensation for stock market losses. The presidents of the "Big Four" brokerages jointly decided to formally release the names after the list was published in the Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Japan's leading business daily, and government officials called for disclosures. Some of Japan's biggest manufacturing companies, including Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan Motor Co.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
After two years of wrangling for a seat on the board of Koito Manufacturing Co., T. Boone Pickens Jr. said Monday he plans to give in and sell his 26.4% stake in the Japanese auto parts maker. "We've given up on ever getting on the board of Koito," said Pickens, the Texas oilman-financier who helped pioneer hostile takeover tactics in the United States. In an Opinion Page article for the Washington Post, Pickens wrote that he would sell his 42.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than any event since the end of World War II, the Gulf War has prompted a sea change in Japanese thinking and policy. For the first time, a realization that Japan can no longer sit on the sidelines while the United States bears the burden of tending to the world has swept the country's leadership. Fears that inaction could isolate Japan and cost the nation its American alliance--its only real security guarantee--have spurred eye-popping changes.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | Associated Press
More than 10 Japanese securities companies are being investigated for allegedly compensating favored customers for 16 billion yen, or $107 million, in losses after the 1987 stock market crash, major Japanese newspapers reported today. The reports, which came out in the early afternoon, had a major impact on Tokyo currency and stock markets, stimulating a fall in both the yen and in share prices. The dollar closed higher at 150.11 yen, up 0.98 yen from Wednesday's finish of 149.13 yen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1995 | From Reuters
An investment company owner from Irvine and a former U.S. Justice Department official have been convicted of charges stemming from the sale of $400 million worth of counterfeit Japanese government bonds, prosecutors said. In a verdict returned late Thursday, a Tampa federal court jury found B. J. Bravender Ah Loo guilty on 10 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud, securities fraud, money laundering, wire fraud and passing counterfeit Japanese bonds. Norbert A.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than any event since the end of World War II, the Gulf War has prompted a sea change in Japanese thinking and policy. For the first time, a realization that Japan can no longer sit on the sidelines while the United States bears the burden of tending to the world has swept the country's leadership. Fears that inaction could isolate Japan and cost the nation its American alliance--its only real security guarantee--have spurred eye-popping changes.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nomura Securities Co., the world's largest securities brokerage and a symbol of Japan's new global financial power, filed suit for libel in a London court Wednesday against an American author who alleged that the company has been involved in insider trading and other securities violations in Japan. A lawyer representing Nomura said the company alleges that it has been defamed by Albert J. Alletzhauser, a London-based financier and former stock salesman in Tokyo who wrote "The House of Nomura."
BUSINESS
April 17, 1990 | from Associated Press
Yamaichi Securities, one of Japan's 17 major securities companies, said today it faces a loss of $24 million due to one customer's bankruptcy last month. Yamaichi, on orders from the customer in February, bought 3 million shares--or one-seventh of the total outstanding--of Nippon Seisen, a leading wire maker, at the equivalent of about $44 million for delivery in four days.
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