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OPINION
November 29, 1992 | David Williams, David Williams is an editorial writer for the Japan Times. His new book, "Japan: Beyond the End of History," will be published next year by Routledge.
"I crawl into bed, and as I turn out the light, my body begins to quiver uncontrollably. And from my mouth issues a low moan, and I think: 'Why me?' " This almost silent scream is but one moment in "Fuyu no Ginka" ("The Milky Way in Winter"), Murao Kusabuse's chronicle of his struggle with AIDS, just published here. In one sense, Kusabuse is not alone. He shares his nightmare with tens of thousands of AIDS victims worldwide.
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SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By David Wharton
Concluding a three-day visit to Japan, Olympic inspectors expressed satisfaction Friday with early preparations for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games. The four-man contingent visited a number of existing and potential venues and held discussions with the host country's organizing committee. "Tokyo 2020 has successfully undertaken a number of important steps on its seven-year Olympic journey," said John Coates, chairman of the coordination commission for the International Olympic Committee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Kenji Hall, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Kaneto Shindo has spent most of his long career telling other people's stories. As a screenwriter and film director, he showed the hardscrabble lives of the have-nots in Japanese society — prostitutes, farmers, migrant workers and war victims. No subject seemed too grim for him to explore. But there was one story from his own past that he kept from almost everyone: an episode from when he was in the imperial navy during World War II. It had weighed on his mind for decades. By the time Shindo decided to tell his story, he was 98 years old. "I felt my own death approaching, but there were things I still had to say," he says.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By David Wharton
Concluding a three-day visit to Japan, Olympic inspectors expressed satisfaction Friday with early preparations for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games. The four-man contingent visited a number of existing and potential venues and held discussions with the host country's organizing committee. "Tokyo 2020 has successfully undertaken a number of important steps on its seven-year Olympic journey," said John Coates, chairman of the coordination commission for the International Olympic Committee.
OPINION
April 19, 2009
Re "Tokyo's life lessons for L.A.," Column, April 15 Before moving to Japan five years ago from San Pedro, I never thought any place could match L.A. Until I moved to Tokyo. This beautiful, vibrant, clean city is thriving. It's also very safe. When I first arrived, I ventured out to a nightclub. As I returned home in the wee hours, a group of men walked directly behind me. My L.A. instincts set in -- my jaw tightened and my fists clenched. But as the men walked by, they gave me a polite greeting and that was that.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | JOJI SAKURAI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the intricate knot of alleyways behind Tokyo's Shimbashi train station, businessmen stagger out of dilapidated bars with names like The Soul of Drunkenness and Oblivion. Neon casts an eerie light on one man bent double, retching, in the middle of the street. That Japan likes a drink is clear to any pedestrian out after dark.
OPINION
October 5, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Andrew Horvat is the Tokyo correspondent for the London Independent.
By saying that Japanese society is superior to that of the United States, Japanese prime minister Yasuhiro Nakasone drew attention to the huge perception gap between Japanese and Americans. Make no mistake about it. It was no slip of the tongue when Nakasone said that Japanese society is "far more intelligent" than American society because "there are a large number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans" in the United States and "their level is low."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989 | PAUL KENNEDY, Paul Kennedy, a professor of history at Yale University, is author of "The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers." and
It is curious how little--or how much--weight we attach to the individual leaders of some of today's important nations. Were Mikhail S. Gorbachev to be suddenly replaced, the world would tremble; it would tremble almost as much if President Bush were to be assassinated, leaving Vice President Dan Quayle as his successor. In China, there is furious speculation about the condition, opinions and intentions of Deng Xiaoping.
SPORTS
August 4, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
When Hiroki Kuroda told the Dodgers last week that he would not waive the no-trade clause in his contract to facilitate a trade to a World Series contender, General Manager Ned Colletti said he thought the decision was based on how comfortable the Japanese right-hander felt in Los Angeles. Manager Don Mattingly offered a similar opinion, explaining how a player who does not speak English could be hesitant to make a midseason move. Something was lost in translation. Kuroda said his decision was based on a previous decision, which was to re-sign with the Dodgers over the winter.
OPINION
April 19, 2009
Re "Tokyo's life lessons for L.A.," Column, April 15 Before moving to Japan five years ago from San Pedro, I never thought any place could match L.A. Until I moved to Tokyo. This beautiful, vibrant, clean city is thriving. It's also very safe. When I first arrived, I ventured out to a nightclub. As I returned home in the wee hours, a group of men walked directly behind me. My L.A. instincts set in -- my jaw tightened and my fists clenched. But as the men walked by, they gave me a polite greeting and that was that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
After a week here, I still haven't mastered Japanese. I'm prone to say hello when I mean thank you, or vice versa, and I seldom know what I am ordering at restaurants, so the chicken might actually be eel. But regardless of what I'm attempting to communicate, the Japanese people bow graciously, which is probably a way of hiding their laughter.
WORLD
April 2, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Like good daughters anywhere, Mayumi and Kaori Asahara worry about their father's declining health. They are alarmed that he looks so thin and won't see a doctor. They fret that he refuses to wear the new clothes they gave him to replace his fraying old ones. But they desperately need something back from their father too. They are seeking an explanation of why the man who taught them to cherish life, even that of an ant, could be a cult leader responsible for Japan's worst terrorist attack.
WORLD
October 26, 2002 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
A member of a right-wing extremist group was taken into custody in the stabbing death of an opposition lawmaker in front of his house, Japanese media reported today. The attack sent shock waves through a nation where violence against leaders is rare. Broadcaster NHK said the man was in custody. Kyodo News, citing investigators, said the man had quarreled with the victim several times over money at the lawmaker's office. Police declined to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
Hello Kitty is waaaaay late. It's nearly 9 p.m., and she was supposed to be here an hour ago. But, hey, it's Southern California, and she's apparently stuck in traffic coming from Irvine. "She's on her way," mutters Jaime Scholnick, a visual artist who's directing her dream project on digital video. It will be the centerpiece of her fall show at POST Gallery, a show she's calling "Hello Kitty Gets a Mouth."
BUSINESS
June 18, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kumi Sato, an American-educated entrepreneur, recently asked her Japanese investment advisor whether she should buy U.S. growth stocks. "Sato-san, I think that before the end of the year the U.S. market is going to crash," he replied. She asked why, since recent economic statistics make the moribund Japanese stock market look riskier. "I just have that gut feeling," he replied. "It's impossible that everything can go that well in America." Sato, president of Cosmo Public Relations Co.
WORLD
October 26, 2002 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
A member of a right-wing extremist group was taken into custody in the stabbing death of an opposition lawmaker in front of his house, Japanese media reported today. The attack sent shock waves through a nation where violence against leaders is rare. Broadcaster NHK said the man was in custody. Kyodo News, citing investigators, said the man had quarreled with the victim several times over money at the lawmaker's office. Police declined to comment.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever wondered what it would be like to be a kamikaze or a Japanese World War II fighter ace? To command Japan's greatest battleship before it slipped below the waves? It'll cost you no more than a couple of $7 beers at the Anchor Bar in the heart of Fukuoka to find out. Head down a small alley and up three narrow flights of stairs and you'll find yourself in a time warp--a long, windowless lounge complete with the weapons, medals and memorabilia of Japan's mammoth failed war effort.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | JOJI SAKURAI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the intricate knot of alleyways behind Tokyo's Shimbashi train station, businessmen stagger out of dilapidated bars with names like The Soul of Drunkenness and Oblivion. Neon casts an eerie light on one man bent double, retching, in the middle of the street. That Japan likes a drink is clear to any pedestrian out after dark.
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