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OPINION
January 18, 2013 | By Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman
This month 75 years ago, the people of Nanking, China's ancient capital city, were in the midst of one of the worst atrocities in history, the infamous Rape of Nanking. The truth of what actually happened is at the center of a bitter dispute between China and Japan that continues to play out in present-day relations. Many Chinese see Japan's election last month of ultraconservative nationalist Shinzo Abe as prime minister as just the latest in a string of insults. And it was recently reported that Japan is considering rolling back its 1993 apology regarding "comfort women," the thousands of women the Japanese army sexually enslaved during World War II. In 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army, captured Nanking on Dec. 13. No one knows the exact toll the Japanese soldiers exacted on its citizens, but a postwar Allied investigation put the numbers at more than 200,000 killed and at least 20,000 women and girls raped in the six weeks after the city fell.
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OPINION
January 18, 2013 | By Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman
This month 75 years ago, the people of Nanking, China's ancient capital city, were in the midst of one of the worst atrocities in history, the infamous Rape of Nanking. The truth of what actually happened is at the center of a bitter dispute between China and Japan that continues to play out in present-day relations. Many Chinese see Japan's election last month of ultraconservative nationalist Shinzo Abe as prime minister as just the latest in a string of insults. And it was recently reported that Japan is considering rolling back its 1993 apology regarding "comfort women," the thousands of women the Japanese army sexually enslaved during World War II. In 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army, captured Nanking on Dec. 13. No one knows the exact toll the Japanese soldiers exacted on its citizens, but a postwar Allied investigation put the numbers at more than 200,000 killed and at least 20,000 women and girls raped in the six weeks after the city fell.
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NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of World War II dogs--including 25 killed in action--have been recognized for their heroic service on Guam. A statue of Kurt, a Doberman pinscher who saved the lives of 250 Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers, was dedicated at the University of Tennessee's College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among the most painful chapters in modern Chinese history is Japan's 1937 invasion of Nanjing. Hundreds of thousands were killed, countless women were raped, and soldiers and civilians alike suffered unspeakable brutalities. So when Chinese writer-director Lu Chuan set out to make a movie about the siege of the city, he had a notion of how the story would go. "In the beginning I was just going to make a traditional movie, with a single plot and one hero," said Lu. "I received a historical education in China, so at first I believed all these Japanese soldiers were beasts.
OPINION
December 24, 2002
I can't agree with Roger Norton's implication that the Bataan Death March (letter, Dec. 20) should somehow mitigate sympathy for those interned at Manzanar. The difference, and it is a crucial one, is that the perpetrators of the Bataan atrocity were Japanese soldiers. The victims of internment were mostly American civilians. Neil Fletcher Santa Monica
WORLD
January 13, 2006 | Tony Perry and Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writers
On a U.S. Navy base where the streets are named for bloody World War II battles on Pacific islands, American sailors and Marines are now teaching Japanese soldiers the basics of mounting an amphibious assault. Although the training is said to be somewhat rudimentary, it is meant to boost the capabilities of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces and to further strengthen military ties between the two allies. "They're a strong, tough light infantry unit," Marine Lt. Col.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven women forced to provide sex to Japanese soldiers in World War II received compensation from a private Japanese fund, officials said. They were the first South Korean former sex slaves to accept such payments. The victims were each given $17,000 and a letter of apology from Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, the South Korean Foreign Ministry said.
OPINION
August 7, 2003
Re "Keep 1945 Seared in Our Hearts," by Johann Christoph Arnold, Commentary, Aug. 4: By all means, keep 1945 seared in your heart, but don't pass over its context with a mere nod. Unfortunately, Arnold does just that when he mentions in passing "all the arguments defending the United States' use of the A-bomb." Japanese soldiers had been committing mass murder since Japan's invasion of Manchuria in 1931 and were still committing atrocities as the atomic bombs were being dropped. Arnold quotes a friend "who was in the vanguard of Marines to land at Nagasaki" to emphasize the horrible devastation caused by the atomic bomb, but leaves out of consideration the suffering of the millions of Chinese (and others)
WORLD
June 20, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Japan's government will withdraw its troops from Iraq, ending a mission that broke postwar taboos by sending its troops into foreign combat zones for the first time since 1945. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told executives of his ruling party that the roughly 600 Japanese soldiers stationed in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah would come home over the next two months, according to Japanese media reports. "We've finished this chapter," Koizumi reportedly told the officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994
In an article about the visit of the emperor and empress of Japan ("Royal Visit Gives Show of Respect," June 23) an older Nisei expressed regret about the loss of allegiance to social values, once a part of Japanese culture. In particular, one Confucian teaching was cited: "Be dutiful to your parents, true to your friends, study hard, cultivate the arts and work for the public good." Restate that in the first person as a pledge of good citizenship and let it be used in place of the Pledge of Allegiance in school grades K though eight.
WORLD
May 21, 2009 | John M. Glionna
College student Chen Lin heard the buzz about the new film depicting the horrors of Japan's World War II-era massacre of 300,000 Chinese civilians in Nanjing. Friends told her that the images in the Chinese-distributed drama, "City of Life and Death," would be brutal -- mass rapes, point-blank executions, public beheadings and victims buried alive.
WORLD
April 30, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Kang Il-chul rides in the back of a van packed with gossiping old women. The 82-year-old girlishly covers her mouth to whisper a secret. "We argue a lot about the food," she says, wrinkling her nose. "To tell you the truth, some of these old ladies are grouchy." There are eight of them, sharing a hillside home on the outskirts of Seoul, sparring over everything from territory to room temperature. Some wear makeup and stylish hats; others are happy in robes and slippers.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | Rachel D'Oro, Associated Press
The searchers dug for days, ignoring blisters and sore muscles to look for the remains of Japanese soldiers buried in mass graves after a World War II battle on the Aleutian island of Attu. But old bullets and bits of barbed wire were all that had emerged from beneath the grassy tundra -- until the end of the two-week mission by U.S. and Japanese representatives who had traveled to the remote resting place of nearly 2,500 soldiers. On May 23, searchers' shovels struck decaying wood boxes containing the well-preserved bones of two Japanese soldiers, probably buried by their comrades during the 1943 Battle of Attu.
WORLD
June 20, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Japan's government will withdraw its troops from Iraq, ending a mission that broke postwar taboos by sending its troops into foreign combat zones for the first time since 1945. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told executives of his ruling party that the roughly 600 Japanese soldiers stationed in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah would come home over the next two months, according to Japanese media reports. "We've finished this chapter," Koizumi reportedly told the officials.
WORLD
April 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A former Japanese soldier last seen by his family when he went off to fight in World War II has resurfaced in Ukraine and is returning home to see his relatives after more than 60 years, the government said Monday. Ishinosuke Uwano, now 83, had been declared among Japan's war dead in 2000. Suminori Arima, a health ministry official in charge of locating war veterans lost overseas, declined to say where Uwano had been the last six decades or why he had not been in touch with his family.
WORLD
January 13, 2006 | Tony Perry and Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writers
On a U.S. Navy base where the streets are named for bloody World War II battles on Pacific islands, American sailors and Marines are now teaching Japanese soldiers the basics of mounting an amphibious assault. Although the training is said to be somewhat rudimentary, it is meant to boost the capabilities of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces and to further strengthen military ties between the two allies. "They're a strong, tough light infantry unit," Marine Lt. Col.
NEWS
January 14, 1998
On Dec. 30, The Times presented a review of the book "The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II" by Iris Chang. She describes the killing 60 years ago of some 260,000 to 350,000 Chinese by Japanese soldiers. There is no mention of the United States' involvement, which at the time made front-page news in our nation's newspapers, including The Times. While the Chinese capital was being overrun, the USS Panay gunboat, stationed at Nanking, escorted three tanker ships 28 miles upstream on the Yangtze to supposedly safe waters.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | Reuters
The Philippines on Thursday applauded Japan's belated admission that it had forced Asian women to be sex slaves during World War II, but Filipina victims said an apology was not enough. "The Philippine government is happy that the Japanese government has apologized to the tens of thousands of women who were forced to serve as sex slaves to Japanese soldiers during World War II," Press Secretary Jesus Sison said.
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | Eric Talmadge, Associated Press Writer
Yoshio Shinozuka sits on the wooden steps of an old Buddhist temple just down the road from his home and the place where he will be buried. Surrounded by pine trees and rice paddies, the temple is quiet save for the incessant buzzing of cicadas. Frail and fast approaching his 83rd birthday, he points to a small cemetery guarded by a statue of the Goddess of Mercy that will be his final resting place. "I've already chosen the plot," he says.
OPINION
August 7, 2003
Re "Keep 1945 Seared in Our Hearts," by Johann Christoph Arnold, Commentary, Aug. 4: By all means, keep 1945 seared in your heart, but don't pass over its context with a mere nod. Unfortunately, Arnold does just that when he mentions in passing "all the arguments defending the United States' use of the A-bomb." Japanese soldiers had been committing mass murder since Japan's invasion of Manchuria in 1931 and were still committing atrocities as the atomic bombs were being dropped. Arnold quotes a friend "who was in the vanguard of Marines to land at Nagasaki" to emphasize the horrible devastation caused by the atomic bomb, but leaves out of consideration the suffering of the millions of Chinese (and others)
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