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NEWS
November 7, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rather unusual television commercial, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung bids a warm welcome to Japanese tourists, inviting them to "come take a look at the new Korea." And the Japanese are responding in droves. Close and comparatively cheap by Tokyo standards, South Korea is emerging as the new destination for recessionary Japan. Flights from Tokyo to Seoul are so full that it's difficult to get reservations even weeks ahead of time.
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NEWS
October 16, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung lectured visiting Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi on Monday over the need for Japan to undertake a full assessment of its wartime past, even as Koizumi apologized for the pain his country had caused South Koreans. Koizumi's first meeting with Kim since Koizumi became prime minister six months ago followed months of deteriorating relations between the two nations.
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NEWS
October 16, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung lectured visiting Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi on Monday over the need for Japan to undertake a full assessment of its wartime past, even as Koizumi apologized for the pain his country had caused South Koreans. Koizumi's first meeting with Kim since Koizumi became prime minister six months ago followed months of deteriorating relations between the two nations.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rather unusual television commercial, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung bids a warm welcome to Japanese tourists, inviting them to "come take a look at the new Korea." And the Japanese are responding in droves. Close and comparatively cheap by Tokyo standards, South Korea is emerging as the new destination for recessionary Japan. Flights from Tokyo to Seoul are so full that it's difficult to get reservations even weeks ahead of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | Are President Clinton's reelection campaign schedulers about to cause a fissure in U.S.-Korean relations? and Tom Plate
For some time, the president's principal foreign policy advisors have been emphasizing the importance of Asia. But a flap is brewing between Seoul and Washington that must be cleared up before it becomes real serious. Fortunately, there is time to fix it. In mid-April, the White House says, the president plans a two-day diplomatic trip to Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1988
Seven years of protectionism for the American auto industry became eight on April 1 when Japan's car makers began another annual extension of their "voluntary" quotas on exports to the United States. Import limitations have now lasted twice as long as their advocates said would be necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | SIMON WINCHESTER, Simon Winchester is Pacific region correspondent for the Manchester Guardian and Conde Nast Traveler, and author of "Pacific Nightmare" (Birch Lane Press, 1992). and
Should efforts to bring Pyongyang to heel over the nuclear-inspection issue fall through and the United States manages to persuade the United Nations to invoke sanctions against North Korea, the action will have, on the country's 22 million inhabitants, precisely no effect. The North Koreans will scowl and bear it, just as they have scowled and borne the vicissitudes of the half-century of ill fortune that have dogged their remarkable little country.
OPINION
October 15, 2000 | ROBERT DUJARRIC, Robert Dujarric is a research fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington. He is the author of "Korea After Unification" (Hudson Institute, 2000)
President Kim Dae Jung's Nobel Peace Prize caps a year of momentous developments in Korean affairs. In June the two Korean leaders held an unprecedented summit. This week Cho Myong Nok, one of North Korea's top officials, visited the White House, and President Clinton might travel to North Korea before his term expires. President Kim's Nobel prize rewards his diplomatic efforts in bringing about reconciliation on the Korean peninsula.
WORLD
December 15, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
North Korea's deadly shelling of a Yellow Sea island last month not only raised the specter of war on the Korean peninsula, it also laid bare the political tensions between two key U.S. allies: Japan and South Korea. The traditionally uneasy relationship between Tokyo and Seoul turned chillier last week when Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said his country's military, known as the Self-Defense Forces, could be dispatched to South Korea to whisk Japanese nationals out of harm's way. The comments were meant to reassure Japanese citizens about potential threats from North Korea or China, but instead they raised concerns about the likelihood of Japan's rearmament.
WORLD
September 21, 2009 | John M. Glionna and Ju-min Park, Park is in The Times' Seoul Bureau.
Lee Young-soo sees a social revolution happening before his eyes: South Korea's fundamental shift to the right, a move that has many here fretting about a looming collision. It's not politics they're talking about, but walking in public. As he hurries through the chaotic pedestrian flow at a local subway station, Lee moves instinctively left to take the down escalator toward his train -- only to see the mass of commuters rising toward him. Narrowly missing slamming into someone, he scurries over to the right side and joins the others moving down.
SPORTS
June 1, 1996 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning, precedent-setting and highly controversial decision Friday, FIFA, the world governing body for soccer, awarded World Cup 2002 to Japan and South Korea. That's right, both countries. Never before in the 66-year history of soccer's quadrennial world championship tournament have two nations shared the finals. The action in Zurich opens the way for other, smaller countries to submit joint bids in the future.
SPORTS
September 25, 1988 | FRED HIATT, The Washington Post
Lu Lamont, 52, a Detroit bookkeeper who has followed the Olympics from Montreal to Los Angeles to this Asian capital, has one complaint about this year's site: she's having trouble finding Diet Coke. Other than that, Lamont says, she thinks South Korea is "marvelous." Also, "wonderful, awesome, warm and welcoming." And, in case you've missed the point, "magnificent and modern," too.
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