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BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1995
Between 1908 and 1924, more than 20,000 women who left Japan for Hawaii did so as "picture brides," betrothed to Japanese sugar plantation workers. They were the Issei--the first generation of laborers who dreamed of building a better life in America. Today, three generations later, the Issei are in their 90s and only a handful of the picture brides survive. Their story is being told in a movie six years in the making and financed in its early phases through grants and donations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two teen-age college students from Japan who came to the United States to pursue their dreams of becoming filmmakers, only to be gunned down in a carjacking, died after being taken off life support systems Sunday, the day their parents arrived from Japan. Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura, both 19, died Sunday evening, said Harbor-UCLA Medical Center spokesman Randy Foster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two teen-age college students from Japan who came to the United States to pursue their dreams of becoming filmmakers, only to be gunned down in a carjacking, died after being taken off life support systems Sunday, the day their parents arrived from Japan. Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura, both 19, died Sunday evening, said Harbor-UCLA Medical Center spokesman Randy Foster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A 17-day American fact-finding trip by a Japanese family waging a do-it-yourself fight against anti-black racism in their country has had an unhappy ending in Los Angeles. Luggage containing journals and videotapes chronicling the family's visits with such prominent blacks as the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, Coretta Scott King and Baltimore Orioles baseball manager Frank Robinson disappeared moments after their arrival at Los Angeles International Airport.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, Japan's powerful Ministry of International Trade and Industry floated the idea of exporting a new commodity to the United States and other countries. But for a change the Japanese found no ready market for the export, which was not a fancy new television or camcorder or car. Rather, it was Japanese retirees.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | SACHI KANESHIRO
I knew that she was my sister, but I felt no familial tie with her until years later. Dorothy was the little girl who came to visit us with the Lanphears. She looked Japanese like us, but after a short stay, she would tug at the big, red-haired man's pant leg. "Ira, let's go home." Mama would hear and quickly look away. Home to Dorothy was the Lanphears' large, two-story house in Azusa.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With allied soldiers risking their lives in the Gulf War, Japan has decided that it is no time for its citizenry to be seen taking in the wonders of the world and having a good time. Thus, Japanese government officials are telling people not to travel abroad. Americans "are spilling their blood for us," Shokei Arai, a member of the Japanese Diet, said recently in a statement that is being echoed in business and bureaucratic circles.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1988 | JOHN BURGESS, Washington Post
Driving her Toyota into a filling station not long ago, a Washington woman was surprised to find about 50 Asian men crowding its pavement, some armed with cameras. As she hefted a self-service hose and pumped $5 of regular unleaded, they moved close, snapped photos and watched her every move with fascination. Who were they? A Japanese study delegation, of course, hot on the trail of American wisdom on gas station management.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture aimed at recognizing Japan's sensitivities to violence in America, President Clinton today phoned and expressed his condolences to the parents of a Japanese high school exchange student who was shot to death in Louisiana last October. Early this morning, Clinton talked by telephone for about 10 minutes with Masaichi and Maeko Hattori, the parents of the slain student, Yoshihiro Hattori.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Hoping to prevent another tragic misunderstanding, officials plan to introduce U.S.-bound Japanese travelers to American slang. "Back off," "cut that out," "get lost" and "hands in the air" are among about 30 expressions to be included in a new pamphlet. The project came in response to the October shooting death of teen-age exchange student Yoshihiro Hattori in Baton Rouge, La.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
Five years ago, Osamu Itoh uprooted his wife and daughter from their home in Tokyo and settled in America's midsection in a town called Normal. They found it anything but. After 18 months of dealing with the language barrier, the foreign food, the strange customs and the stress of raising a teen-ager in an unfamiliar land, Itoh's wife, Mariko, summed it up this way: "Very awful."
NEWS
November 7, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new President has been elected in America. New allegations of political corruption are cropping up in Tokyo. World trade talks are unraveling in Geneva. Yet a dispatch from Louisiana commanded much of the media attention here this week. Ronald Peairs, 30, of Baton Rouge, was indicted on a charge of manslaughter after fatally shooting a 16-year-old Japanese exchange student who knocked on the wrong door while looking for a Halloween party.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's sick of it all--the strait-laced system that demands conformity, rewards seniority over talent and keeps everyone working day and night in an expensive, teeming homogeneous spot. She's gifted and single and yearns to be free--to be liberated from an uncreative society with an obsessive concern with gender-based roles. Now they both have found a way out.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | SACHI KANESHIRO
I knew that she was my sister, but I felt no familial tie with her until years later. Dorothy was the little girl who came to visit us with the Lanphears. She looked Japanese like us, but after a short stay, she would tug at the big, red-haired man's pant leg. "Ira, let's go home." Mama would hear and quickly look away. Home to Dorothy was the Lanphears' large, two-story house in Azusa.
NEWS
July 12, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Sometimes bosses do not realize that it is the little things that matter most to workers. Signs of fairness and trust, factory workers often say, are more telling of how their company feels about them than any formal management-labor relations program. The Japanese built their reputation as employers largely through attention to such details. But 40-year-old Peggy Gleissner thinks her Japanese employer--Nissan--forgot to teach that lesson to its American supervisors at its auto plant here.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture aimed at recognizing Japan's sensitivities to violence in America, President Clinton today phoned and expressed his condolences to the parents of a Japanese high school exchange student who was shot to death in Louisiana last October. Early this morning, Clinton talked by telephone for about 10 minutes with Masaichi and Maeko Hattori, the parents of the slain student, Yoshihiro Hattori.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tachi Kiuchi arrived from Tokyo nearly five years ago to head Mitsubishi Electronics America in Cypress, he figured he could run the U.S. subsidiary pretty much the way he had other Mitsubishi operations in Japan. He was wrong. In Japan, Kiuchi personally made most of the key decisions, and a cadre of loyal managers carried them out with seldom a complaint. But things didn't work that way in the United States, where workers are very outspoken.
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