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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993
Japanese women are now trying to emulate Hillary Clinton. Does this mean they will be trying to run the United States too? HOWARD B. SCHIFFER Santa Barbara
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BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Don Lee
TOKYO - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has an unprecedented plan to boost economic growth and shore up his country's shrinking labor force - help more women return to work. About two-thirds of Japanese women leave the workforce after the birth of their first child. Most do not return for years, if ever. It's a major reason the employment rate of Japanese women is one of the lowest in developed economies, particularly among those married and well-educated. Abe's government wants to change that situation for women such as Saori Tachibana.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
With a shocking-pink picture of Tokyo's skyline gracing its front page, Japan's first newspaper designed for women--Lady Kong--hit the newsstands today with lots of fluff but little feminism. As with virtually all enterprises here, men run the daily tabloid, leading some critics to complain that the publication is not likely to challenge the subservient role of women in Japanese society.
SPORTS
July 17, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
There are two women above all others who are especially qualified to voice an opinion about the Women's World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan on Sunday in Frankfurt, Germany. Shannon MacMillan and Tiffeny Milbrett are two of the finest attacking players the U.S. has produced. Gold-medal winners at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 and silver-medal winners four years later at the Sydney Games, they also were teammates on the U.S. side that won the 1999 Women's World Cup. In other words, they know very well the kind of pressure the players on both teams will be under Sunday, and they also know firsthand that something special will be needed to make a difference.
SPORTS
July 28, 1986 | Associated Press
The Japanese women's national volleyball team defeated the United States, 13-15, 15-13, 15-9, 15-3, Sunday in the third match of a five-game exhibition series in Japan. It was the Japanese team's third straight victory in the series. The fourth match will be held Tuesday in Toyama.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton stepped off Air Force One with her husband and approached a line of waiting limousines here Tuesday, a Japanese reporter wrote disapprovingly that "she gestured as if to say in a wife-leading-the-husband-manner, 'That's your car and this is mine.' " The comment was telling, both about Japanese attitudes toward Mrs. Clinton before her arrival and about the current state of this country's attitudes toward women. In Japan, Mrs.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
At a New Year's cocktail party early last year, a high-ranking official of the Japan Socialist Party was overheard to dismiss words of praise for his party's charismatic chairwoman, Takako Doi. "She may have charisma power," the man said, "but she's a little short on brain power."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
Thirty-three Japanese women got a two-day crash course in American feminism this week. "In our city we are oppressed, but many people do not realize women are oppressed," Kazuyo Tanaka said at a meeting at the Women's Center at Cal State Fullerton. "Is there a strategy we can use?" The visitors came from Fullerton's sister city of Fukui in central Japan to ask advice on how to spread the women's movement in Japan.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | VIBEKE LAROI, REUTERS
A new breed of young women is flocking to Japan's bars, racetracks and golf courses--the " oyaji gal." An oyaji is a successful middle-aged man, and an oyaji gal is a woman in her 20s who seeks to mirror his lifestyle. Oyaji gals read sports tabloids in dingy bars, smoke cigarettes and drink beer. The morning after, they knock back a vitamin drink to soothe their hangovers.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | NAO NAKANISHI, REUTERS
A job with three free meals a day and time for a siesta. That's how one old Japanese saying describes the woman's role in marriage. Many Japanese women these days are rejecting that arrangement and getting divorces, although they often find it hard to earn a living on their own in Japan's heavily male-dominated society. Women have initiated 70% of the 155,000 divorces filed annually over the last 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Hideko Takamine, a child star in Japan in the 1930s who became one of her country's leading screen actresses during the post- World War II era, in which she played a variety of contemporary women who captured the tenor of the times, has died. She was 86. FOR THE RECORD: Hideko Takamine: In the Jan. 5 LATExtra section, the caption for a photo that appeared with the obituary of Japanese actress Hideko Takamine misspelled the name of the actor with whom she was pictured. He was Eijiro, not Fijiro, Tono.
WORLD
August 1, 2010 | By Suvendrini Kakuchi, Los Angeles Times
After 25 years working as an accounting assistant in a leading construction company, Asako Nakano decided two summers ago that she needed to stabilize her retirement plans. So she took the plunge and bought a condominium. "The decision to put almost all my savings into a home for myself was a bit daunting, but I never hesitated," said the friendly, confident single woman. "I thought to myself, I am never going to get married, so why not invest in my future? It made sense to me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Kaku Yamanaka, 113, Japan's oldest person, died of natural causes Saturday at a hospital in central Japan after falling ill at the nursing home where she lived in Yatomi City in Aichi prefecture. Born on Dec. 11, 1894, Yamanaka was known for her love of singing and took part in local karaoke contests, an official at the nursing home said. She was the sixth-oldest person in the world at the time of her death. Japan has one of the world's longest average life spans -- a factor often attributed to a healthy diet rich in fish and rice.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2007 | Janice P. Nimura, Special to The Times
"THE funny thing about my love affair with Japan," Veronica Chambers begins, "is that it was never the country of my dreams." In 2000, craving a posting to Paris, the journalist settled instead for a fellowship in Tokyo. That accident led to her new book, "Kickboxing Geishas," and it raises a question: Did serendipity make her objective or obtuse? As the cartoonish title indicates, this is not your average analysis of inscrutable Japan.
BOOKS
August 20, 2006 | Janice P. Nimura, Janice P. Nimura's reviews have appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post.
START with the jacket, covered front and back with photo-booth images of women of all ages. They stare stolidly into the camera, their faces opaque and vaguely disturbing. The book sat on my desk for a month before I realized that every face belonged to the same woman, the young photo artist Tomoko Sawada, from whose "ID-400" series the jacket art is an excerpt. What I had seen as an art director's cute take on the diversity of Japanese women was subtler, trickier, disorienting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Bruce Wallace
When it comes to hair color in Japan, the new black is black. Riding the swell of patriotism in Japan, Shiseido Co. has rocked the market for women's shampoos and conditioners by introducing Tsubaki -- Japanese for camellia blossom -- with a marketing campaign that has some of Japan's hottest entertainers telling women that the route to beauty is to be, well, true to your roots. Ethnic roots in this case.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese artist Yoshiko Shimada is brutally honest about the past in a nation that has not completely come to grips with it. She is a self-declared feminist in a place where many women appear to shun that label. She is blatantly political in a national art tradition that tends to value the quest for beauty. And she uses jarring, uncompromising imagery in a land where subtlety and harmony are promoted.
BOOKS
August 20, 2006 | Janice P. Nimura, Janice P. Nimura's reviews have appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post.
START with the jacket, covered front and back with photo-booth images of women of all ages. They stare stolidly into the camera, their faces opaque and vaguely disturbing. The book sat on my desk for a month before I realized that every face belonged to the same woman, the young photo artist Tomoko Sawada, from whose "ID-400" series the jacket art is an excerpt. What I had seen as an art director's cute take on the diversity of Japanese women was subtler, trickier, disorienting.
NEWS
December 19, 2004 | Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press Writer
No matter how independent, fashionable or popular she may be, Japan's unwed woman has long been labeled the eternal loser -- lonesome during the holidays, dreaming of the child she never had, dreading the inevitable question at family gatherings: "Aren't you married yet?" But in unprecedented numbers, Japanese women are defying the stereotype with a firm "No" -- and trying to cheer up others like them.
WORLD
September 5, 2004 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
At 5 a.m. on a summer day already sticky with humidity, three dozen ascetic priests known as yamabushi -- "those who lie down in the mountains" -- have gathered at the foot of this mountain in southern Japan to pray before climbing its sacred slopes. Peaking at 5,640 feet, Mt. Omine is far from the highest mountain in Japan.
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