Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJared Diamond
IN THE NEWS

Jared Diamond

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
According to Jared Diamond, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer ("The World Until Yesterday," "Collapse," "Guns, Germs, and Steel") who spoke to Patt Morrison about his work Sunday, Americans shouldn't waste time worrying about statistically rare crises like terrorism or plane crashes. "I've already done the most dangerous thing I'm going to do all day -- taken a shower," he said at the Festival of Books in his strong New England accent. Lest people conclude that he was irrationally obsessive, Diamond laid out the statistics: "I'm 76 years old. Life expectancy for a man is 91 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
According to Jared Diamond, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer ("The World Until Yesterday," "Collapse," "Guns, Germs, and Steel") who spoke to Patt Morrison about his work Sunday, Americans shouldn't waste time worrying about statistically rare crises like terrorism or plane crashes. "I've already done the most dangerous thing I'm going to do all day -- taken a shower," he said at the Festival of Books in his strong New England accent. Lest people conclude that he was irrationally obsessive, Diamond laid out the statistics: "I'm 76 years old. Life expectancy for a man is 91 years.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Imagine that the whole world wears bifocals. Heavy black-rimmed things that conspire with gravity to slide down our collective nose. Or maybe sleek, light designer frames that just ooze West L.A. chic. The style doesn't matter -- it's the lenses that count, and most of us, truth be told, only use the little half-moons to see what's in front of us. Jared Diamond uses the rest of the lenses, and he sees things that most of us miss.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | by Carolyn kellogg
Presumed Republican candidate Mitt Romney's international tour was marked by missteps. One speech he gave at a fundraiser in Jerusalem was controversial for the figures he cited about the economic disparities between Israel and the Palestinians, and also for the conclusions he made about what that said about their cultures. And now, the author of one of the books he referenced in that speech is speaking out. Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning book "Guns, Germs and Steel," says Romney "misrepresented my views.
BOOKS
March 22, 1992 | Lionel Tiger, Tiger is Charles Darwin Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers. Among his books are "Men in Groups," "The Manufacture of Evil: Ethics, Evolution and the Industrial System" and, most recently, "The Pursuit of Pleasure" (Little, Brown)
Judges still tell people who batter children and wantonly defile the helpless that they have "acted like animals." There remain large numbers of people in science-based countries such as ours who do not accept the theory of evolution. Even in the university, the intellectual and administrative gap between the natural and the social sciences continues to permit practitioners of the latter largely to ignore the work of the former.
BOOKS
March 9, 1997 | ALFRED W. CROSBY, Alfred W. Crosby is professor of American studies, history and geography at the University of Texas, Austin. He is the author of several books, including "Ecological Imperialism" and, most recently, "The Measure of Reality: Quantification and Western Society, 1250-1600," both from Cambridge University Press
I am ethically obliged to start off with the admission that I have never read anything by Jared Diamond that I didn't like. He is broadly erudite, writes in a style that pleasantly expresses scientific concepts in vernacular American English and deals almost exclusively in questions that should interest everyone concerned about how humanity has developed.
MAGAZINE
September 12, 1999 | Carolyn Ramsay last wrote for the magazine on UCLA Nobel Laureate Louis Ignarro
Jared Diamond wants to be famous. The slight, frizzy-haired UCLA Medical School physiology professor wants to reach beyond his admiring audience of science buffs and feel the heady jolt that comes from recognition by mainstream America. In Southern California, in particular, this quest places him in a thundering herd of attention-seekers willing to do anything for their one big shot at stardom. Diamond's approach, however, is more old-fashioned--more naive, some might say.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011
Aloud at Central Library brings together two formidable scholars for a discussion on the origins of the world's social and political institutions and their relation to tribal order and environmental history. Francis Fukuyama, the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Relations at Stanford University, is the author of "The End of History and the Last Man" and, most recently, "The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | by Carolyn kellogg
Presumed Republican candidate Mitt Romney's international tour was marked by missteps. One speech he gave at a fundraiser in Jerusalem was controversial for the figures he cited about the economic disparities between Israel and the Palestinians, and also for the conclusions he made about what that said about their cultures. And now, the author of one of the books he referenced in that speech is speaking out. Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning book "Guns, Germs and Steel," says Romney "misrepresented my views.
BOOKS
January 2, 2005 | Alfred W. Crosby, Alfred W. Crosby, professor emeritus of American studies, history and geography at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of many books, including "The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492."
Gloomy books about our environmental problems are pouring off the presses. They have immediate pertinence to our lives, but few people seem to be reading them except the already anxious. Scholarly monographs about various facets of the human experience from Homo erectus to Donald Trump are likewise piling up without generating much concerned interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011
Aloud at Central Library brings together two formidable scholars for a discussion on the origins of the world's social and political institutions and their relation to tribal order and environmental history. Francis Fukuyama, the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Relations at Stanford University, is the author of "The End of History and the Last Man" and, most recently, "The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2007 | Kathleen Sharp, Special to The Times
Susan Diamond and her older brother Jared have been part of the intellectual and cultural scene in Los Angeles for decades. He's the much-admired geography professor at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Guns, Germs and Steel." She's the veteran journalist who's better known as the former Los Angeles Times consumer reporter S.J. Diamond. Now Susan Diamond has written a crime novel, "What Goes Around," just published by William Morrow.
BOOKS
January 2, 2005 | Alfred W. Crosby, Alfred W. Crosby, professor emeritus of American studies, history and geography at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of many books, including "The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492."
Gloomy books about our environmental problems are pouring off the presses. They have immediate pertinence to our lives, but few people seem to be reading them except the already anxious. Scholarly monographs about various facets of the human experience from Homo erectus to Donald Trump are likewise piling up without generating much concerned interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Imagine that the whole world wears bifocals. Heavy black-rimmed things that conspire with gravity to slide down our collective nose. Or maybe sleek, light designer frames that just ooze West L.A. chic. The style doesn't matter -- it's the lenses that count, and most of us, truth be told, only use the little half-moons to see what's in front of us. Jared Diamond uses the rest of the lenses, and he sees things that most of us miss.
MAGAZINE
September 12, 1999 | Carolyn Ramsay last wrote for the magazine on UCLA Nobel Laureate Louis Ignarro
Jared Diamond wants to be famous. The slight, frizzy-haired UCLA Medical School physiology professor wants to reach beyond his admiring audience of science buffs and feel the heady jolt that comes from recognition by mainstream America. In Southern California, in particular, this quest places him in a thundering herd of attention-seekers willing to do anything for their one big shot at stardom. Diamond's approach, however, is more old-fashioned--more naive, some might say.
BOOKS
September 7, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, Robert Lee Hotz, author of "Designs On Life: Exploring the New Frontiers of Human Fertility," is also a science writer for The Times
An evolutionary biologist might explain the suburban passion for sport utility vehicles as a mating ploy meant to signal the owner's reproductive fitness. The oversized automobiles are commodious enough for any number of offspring and, like the peacock's tail, show that the owner can divert any amount of energy to ornamental display. So too, an anthropologist might trace the human tribe's obsession with the sex life of celebrities to the primordial biology of the human species.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2007 | Kathleen Sharp, Special to The Times
Susan Diamond and her older brother Jared have been part of the intellectual and cultural scene in Los Angeles for decades. He's the much-admired geography professor at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Guns, Germs and Steel." She's the veteran journalist who's better known as the former Los Angeles Times consumer reporter S.J. Diamond. Now Susan Diamond has written a crime novel, "What Goes Around," just published by William Morrow.
BOOKS
September 7, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, Robert Lee Hotz, author of "Designs On Life: Exploring the New Frontiers of Human Fertility," is also a science writer for The Times
An evolutionary biologist might explain the suburban passion for sport utility vehicles as a mating ploy meant to signal the owner's reproductive fitness. The oversized automobiles are commodious enough for any number of offspring and, like the peacock's tail, show that the owner can divert any amount of energy to ornamental display. So too, an anthropologist might trace the human tribe's obsession with the sex life of celebrities to the primordial biology of the human species.
BOOKS
March 9, 1997 | ALFRED W. CROSBY, Alfred W. Crosby is professor of American studies, history and geography at the University of Texas, Austin. He is the author of several books, including "Ecological Imperialism" and, most recently, "The Measure of Reality: Quantification and Western Society, 1250-1600," both from Cambridge University Press
I am ethically obliged to start off with the admission that I have never read anything by Jared Diamond that I didn't like. He is broadly erudite, writes in a style that pleasantly expresses scientific concepts in vernacular American English and deals almost exclusively in questions that should interest everyone concerned about how humanity has developed.
BOOKS
March 22, 1992 | Lionel Tiger, Tiger is Charles Darwin Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers. Among his books are "Men in Groups," "The Manufacture of Evil: Ethics, Evolution and the Industrial System" and, most recently, "The Pursuit of Pleasure" (Little, Brown)
Judges still tell people who batter children and wantonly defile the helpless that they have "acted like animals." There remain large numbers of people in science-based countries such as ours who do not accept the theory of evolution. Even in the university, the intellectual and administrative gap between the natural and the social sciences continues to permit practitioners of the latter largely to ignore the work of the former.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|