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Jared Jacobsen

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
In an age preoccupied with performing music on old "authentic" instruments, Jared Jacobsen is trying to restore the once-popular practice of playing transcriptions on huge pipe organs. "Organ transcriptions engage audiences immediately," Jacobsen said in a phone interview from New York, where he is participating in the Chautauqua Institution Summer School of Music. "People used to do (transcriptions of) everything for everything else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
In an age preoccupied with performing music on old "authentic" instruments, Jared Jacobsen is trying to restore the once-popular practice of playing transcriptions on huge pipe organs. "Organ transcriptions engage audiences immediately," Jacobsen said in a phone interview from New York, where he is participating in the Chautauqua Institution Summer School of Music. "People used to do (transcriptions of) everything for everything else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1989 | SUSAN BLISS
While the movement for authentic performance practice may still be in full swing, Jared Jacobsen longs for the days when transcriptions were the organist's stock in trade. On Friday night at the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Jacobsen offered an entire program of transcriptions on the 265-rank Hazel Wright organ. The results were mixed. Transcriptions generate a unique set of problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN
The Muir String Quartet seems to have its geography all wrong. Why would a group named after the famous American naturalist John Muir, who explored California and Alaska in the mid-19th Century and founded the Sierra Club, be based at Boston University? Cellist Michael Reynolds, one of the quartet's founding members, explained that the choice of the group's name reflected the outdoor interests of the original players, not the ensemble's location. In a word, the musicians were nature freaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
The pessimistic observers of the local music scene readily claim that contemporary music can survive here only within the confines of the UC San Diego campus. To be certain, both Mandeville Center and the university's Center for Music Experiment give the same protection to new music that the nearby Torrey Pines State Reserve affords the rare tree species.
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