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Jaron Lanier

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BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
"People have to be able to make money off their brains and their hearts," Jaron Lanier was telling me. "Or else we're all going to starve, and it's the machines that'll get good." It sounded a little bit like Dickens, and a little bit like a line from the "Terminator" movies. But it was all reality, coming from a true computing pioneer and one of modern technology's most insightful critics. Lanier, 49, has been pondering the effect that the World Wide Web -- its ideology as well as its design -- has had on creativity, society and commerce for years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Jaron Lanier has a research job with Microsoft. He won't go into specfics, but it has something to do with imagining the future and asking questions. Lanier is a longtime Silicon Valley insider whose primary occupation has been to imagine, think and ask questions. What if we could enter a simulated electronic world? Answer: Virtual reality, a term he coined. What if computers could recognize faces? The company Eyematic Interfaces, which has been absorbed by Google. What if your computer could trace your movements in real time, putting them on screen?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Ben Ehrenreich
Despite the binary nature of his own neural wiring, each synapse an on/off switch, passing electrochemical messages from axon to dendrite, Jaron Lanier will be the first to tell you that the mind is not a digital device. We are analog creatures, staticky and mysterious, resistant to the normalizing containment of code. Lanier's mind has few apparent boundaries. It grapples with zombies and "gray goo," "inner trolls" and the "lords of the computing clouds," with "cephalopod envy" and "songles" -- "A songle is a dongle for a song," Lanier explains, in case you didn't know -- with "the mystery of Bengalese finch musicality" and the bucket containing all red things.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
"People have to be able to make money off their brains and their hearts," Jaron Lanier was telling me. "Or else we're all going to starve, and it's the machines that'll get good." It sounded a little bit like Dickens, and a little bit like a line from the "Terminator" movies. But it was all reality, coming from a true computing pioneer and one of modern technology's most insightful critics. Lanier, 49, has been pondering the effect that the World Wide Web -- its ideology as well as its design -- has had on creativity, society and commerce for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Jaron Lanier has a research job with Microsoft. He won't go into specfics, but it has something to do with imagining the future and asking questions. Lanier is a longtime Silicon Valley insider whose primary occupation has been to imagine, think and ask questions. What if we could enter a simulated electronic world? Answer: Virtual reality, a term he coined. What if computers could recognize faces? The company Eyematic Interfaces, which has been absorbed by Google. What if your computer could trace your movements in real time, putting them on screen?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990
American Muslims have been excluded from the political arena and usually branded as "terrorists" and "anti-Semitic" if not "foreign" and "backward." New York Mayor David Dinkins excluded us from his campaign in the East and so did Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) in the West. American Muslims have met continuing frustration because they cannot present their views or initiate a discussion with policy-makers regarding international, domestic issues and their plight in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1994 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York
Jaron Lanier has invented an absolutely new way of playing music. He plays instruments inside virtual real ity, the ultra-veristic computer simulation that any teen-ager can tell you about. It works like this: Onstage, Lanier, a dramatically large man with a pale complexion, red hair in long dreadlocks and an unkempt red beard, dons goggles with tiny TV monitors for lenses that seem to transport the wearer directly inside the computer universe.
OPINION
April 9, 2014
Re "A sharing economy," Opinion, April 6 Before I read Jaron Lanier's revelatory book, "Who Owns the Future?," I might have blithely accepted the capitalistic efficiency of the sharing economy as described by Jeremy Rifkin. But consider the case of my cab driver: His professional, safe, reliable and fully insured service is getting killed by under-regulated siphons such as Lyft. Airbnb promises to do the same to hotels by exploiting unfair advantages. Who knows which industry will be next?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By August Brown
With hangovers from the Ultra Music Fest still fresh in their throbbing heads, some of the most important names in dance music will make another run of it in Hollywood on April 17 at a new edition of the International Music Summit. The recurring Ibiza-based conversation series -- a more sober and dance-business-focused gathering -- makes its inaugural L.A. turn at the W Hotel after a satellite event at last year's Coachella festival. The conference will host a full day of interviews between titans of electronic dance music, tech and the music-biz infrastructure.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"Economists have taken us down the wrong road," harrumphed business analyst W. Edwards Deming on PBS' Sunday broadcast of "The Deming of America." The United States isn't training its work force, he adds, and U.S. companies are self-destructing by thinking only three months, not three decades. If he tuned into PBS starting tonight, Deming would find one economist who agrees with him--Robert B. Reich, whose four-hour "Made in America?" (tonight and Wednesday, 7-9 p.m., KVCR Channel 24; 8-10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Ben Ehrenreich
Despite the binary nature of his own neural wiring, each synapse an on/off switch, passing electrochemical messages from axon to dendrite, Jaron Lanier will be the first to tell you that the mind is not a digital device. We are analog creatures, staticky and mysterious, resistant to the normalizing containment of code. Lanier's mind has few apparent boundaries. It grapples with zombies and "gray goo," "inner trolls" and the "lords of the computing clouds," with "cephalopod envy" and "songles" -- "A songle is a dongle for a song," Lanier explains, in case you didn't know -- with "the mystery of Bengalese finch musicality" and the bucket containing all red things.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1994 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York
Jaron Lanier has invented an absolutely new way of playing music. He plays instruments inside virtual real ity, the ultra-veristic computer simulation that any teen-ager can tell you about. It works like this: Onstage, Lanier, a dramatically large man with a pale complexion, red hair in long dreadlocks and an unkempt red beard, dons goggles with tiny TV monitors for lenses that seem to transport the wearer directly inside the computer universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990
American Muslims have been excluded from the political arena and usually branded as "terrorists" and "anti-Semitic" if not "foreign" and "backward." New York Mayor David Dinkins excluded us from his campaign in the East and so did Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) in the West. American Muslims have met continuing frustration because they cannot present their views or initiate a discussion with policy-makers regarding international, domestic issues and their plight in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why can't people fly? Why can't people walk through walls? --Dominic Milano, chairman of CyberArts International Career mind-bender Timothy Leary calls it "the electronic equivalent of LSD." But the people behind the CyberArts International Convention in Los Angeles this weekend prefer to call it "virtual reality," the next wave in interactive media technology that may someday allow you to change the rules of logic, physics and gravity in the convenience of your home.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
John Green, bestselling and prize-winning author of young adult novels including "The Fault In Our Stars" and "Looking for Alaska," gave the commencement address at Butler University on May 11. It's witty, smart, thoughtful, and going viral; if you start hearing people in your life saying "happy birthday, sir," you can thank him. There's a YouTube video of the entire graudation ceremony -- Green begins speaking about an hour in -- and he's...
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