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Jarvik 7

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NEWS
May 5, 1985 | United Press International
The Jarvik-7 artificial heart may soon be implanted into patients awaiting human heart transplants at Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, a spokesman said Saturday. Thomas Chakurda said the hospital and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have proposed that "the Jarvik-7 artificial heart be used as an interim device for those awaiting heart transplantation."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Willem Kolff, the Dutch physician and tinkerer who built the first kidney dialysis machine from cellophane, Ford auto parts and other scraps and in the process saved the lives of millions, died from natural causes Wednesday at a Philadelphia care center. The "father of artificial organs," who also built the first successful artificial heart, was 97. "Dr. Kolff was a pioneer in the truest sense of the word," said Michael K.
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NEWS
December 2, 1985 | United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration, concerned about disappointing results with the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, said today that it is considering whether to allow Dr. William DeVries to complete a series of seven implants the agency earlier authorized. DeVries, based at the Humana Heart Institute of Louisville, Ky., is the only U.S. surgeon licensed to implant permanent artificial blood pumps in humans.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | PEG McENTEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For 112 days, as a plastic heart pumped in his chest, Barney Clark and his wife were a picture of pioneer determination. Or, as one doctor put it, they were like "two rugged old Rocky Mountain sage brushes." Through all the pain and discomfort of being the world's first recipient of a permanent artificial heart, Clark and his wife, Una Loy, had only one other commodity. Time. Time to talk. Time to review their 39 years together. Ten years after the implant, Loy says it wasn't time enough.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | Associated Press
Artificial heart implants can continue, but only with case-by-case government approval and under new monitoring and reporting restrictions, the Food and Drug Administration said today. The FDA adopted the recommendations of a government advisory panel which last month proposed that new restrictions be imposed because of a history of strokes and complications among the four patients who have received artificial hearts. The agency said it has advised Symbion Inc.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | United Press International
Artificial heart recipient Bernadette Chayrez was removed from a ventilator Saturday, and doctors said she continued to show improvement. Chayrez, 40, of Phoenix, began breathing on her own as she neared the end of her sixth week on a second Jarvik-7 miniheart. She is in critical but stable condition.
NEWS
March 24, 1986
Surgeons implanted a Jarvik-7 artificial heart into a 43-year-old factory foreman in an attempt to keep him alive until a human donor heart becomes available, hospital employees said in Pittsburgh. Gary Blake of East Liverpool, Ohio, was in critical condition after the five-hour "uncomplicated" operation, which ended just before midnight, said Tom Chakurda, spokesman for Presbyterian-University Hospital.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | United Press International
A Boston priest received a Jarvik-7 artificial heart Thursday in an operation at Presbyterian-University Hospital, a spokeswoman said. The Rev. Anthony Nuccio, 55, who is waiting for a human heart transplant, was in critical condition.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | Associated Press
A Frenchman who received a Jarvik-7 artificial heart two weeks ago in an effort to strengthen him so he could receive another human heart has died, the Paris Public Hospitals Authority said today. The 25-year-old man, who was never identified, died Wednesday night. The newspaper Le Figaro, which sponsored a collection to help pay for the operation, the first of its type in France, said the man died of a lung infection. King Hassan II of Morocco had donated $357,000 to the fund.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Artificial heart implants must comply with new monitoring and reporting restrictions that allow them to continue only with case-by-case approval from the government, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. In adopting the recommendations of a government advisory panel, the FDA imposed the restrictions because of a history of strokes and other complications among patients who have received the controversial Jarvik-7 artificial heart.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | Associated Press
A 13-year-old who doctors said was the youngest recipient of a Jarvik-7 artificial heart died eight hours after it was implanted as a stopgap measure until a donor heart could be found. Eric Rutkowski died Thursday night after developing pulmonary edema, or fluid in the lungs, St. Luke's Hospital spokeswoman Diane De La Santos said.
NEWS
June 29, 1987
An Escondido man who earlier this month became the first patient in California to receive a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart was given a new human heart in a transplant at Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego. Officials called the operation "very successful." Randy Dunlap, 34, was listed in critical condition after the six-hour surgical procedure, but hospital spokeswoman Cindy Cohagen said, "all signs are optimistic. This is really a medical marvel. The Jarvik worked flawlessly for 12 days.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
In the first use of an artificial heart in California, a team of surgeons in San Diego has implanted a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart in an Escondido man whose transplanted human heart had failed. Randy Dunlap, 34, received the device at Sharp Memorial Hospital on Tuesday after his transplanted heart failed to support his circulation. Hospital officials said the device is to serve as a temporary "bridge" to keep Dunlap alive until another human heart can be found.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | United Press International
The Jarvik-7 artificial heart that saved the life of a Phoenix man two years ago was presented Wednesday to the Smithsonian Institution, and the former patient said he is glad people will be able to see "something that kept me alive." The $15,000 plastic-and-metal blood pump replaced the diseased heart of Michael Drummond, who was 25 when he underwent the operation on Aug. 29, 1985, at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | United Press International
A laid-off factory worker who became the second recipient of the Penn State artificial heart died Friday of a chest infection after being kept alive 13 months by the device, a spokesman for Hershey Medical Center said. Robert Cresswell, 49, of Huntingdon in south-central Pennsylvania, died shortly before 9 a.m., spokesman John Vastyan said.
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A man who received a human heart transplant after being kept alive for more than two weeks with a Jarvik-7 pump has died of heart failure. Thomas Masloroff, 48, died Saturday at St. Luke's Hospital, a day after the transplant surgery, officials said. Dr. Alfred Tector, Masloroff's physician, said the exact cause of the heart failure may not be known for several weeks.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | United Press International
A laid-off factory worker who became the second recipient of the Penn State artificial heart died Friday of a chest infection after being kept alive 13 months by the device, a spokesman for Hershey Medical Center said. Robert Cresswell, 49, of Huntingdon in south-central Pennsylvania, died shortly before 9 a.m., spokesman John Vastyan said.
NEWS
May 25, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A federal advisory panel strongly endorsed the artificial heart program and recommended that efforts be intensified to develop a battery-powered, fully implantable artificial heart that would not require a patient to be "tethered" to an outside power source, government officials said Friday.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
The Jarvik-7 artificial heart, which leads to complications when used as a permanent replacement, can work flawlessly if implanted temporarily in people awaiting transplants, according to a new report. The artificial heart "provided a bridge from almost certain death to satisfactory cardiac transplantation" in six of nine heart patients at the Presbyterian-University Hospital from Oct. 24, 1985, through July 31, 1986, according to the University of Pittsburgh researchers.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | United Press International
A Boston priest received a Jarvik-7 artificial heart Thursday in an operation at Presbyterian-University Hospital, a spokeswoman said. The Rev. Anthony Nuccio, 55, who is waiting for a human heart transplant, was in critical condition.
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