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Jascha Heifetz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1987
Jascha Heifetz, a mortal, dared to play like a god--and succeeded. He was and is the inspiration and the despair of all violinists. Maybe--though I doubt it--Paganini or Sarasate played as well, but for sure no one ever played better. His recordings are his legacy and his testament. We shall not see--or hear--his like again. ROBERT BLUMOFE Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Two experiences that helped foster my devotion to music, growing up, were watching Leonard Bernstein's "Young People's Concerts" and going to the Hollywood Bowl. Thanks to Bernstein, I began to sense the wonder of music. Thanks to the $1 seats at the top of the Bowl, I had the opportunity to get out of the living room and hear the likes of the great violinist Jascha Heifetz. He sounded dimmer and looked even tinier on the stage of the distant shell than he did on a 1950s TV screen.
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NEWS
November 19, 1987 | United Press International
Jascha Heifetz, one of the world's premier violinists, is hospitalized "with a very serious illness" and undergoing treatment for a malignant tumor at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, a family friend said today. The hospital declined to comment at the family's request, Cedars-Sinai spokesman Ron Wise said. A family friend who spoke on condition of anonymity said Heifetz, 86, is "not hovering near death, but very seriously ill."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
You can never have too much Mahler, most Mahler freaks believe. We trust our faith but seldom test it. The massive symphonies and disquieting song cycles are musically and emotionally bold statements that remain special-occasion music, even with the composer having entered the standard repertory. A test did, however, occur at the beginning of this year with Gustavo Dudamel's Mahler Project, in which the conductor divided the nine numbered symphonies into cycles at Walt Disney Concert Hall and in Caracas performed by his two orchestras, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Simón Bolívar Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988 | HERBERT GLASS
Throughout his lengthy career, the late Jascha Heifetz was held in awe by fellow violinists for showing them that nothing was technically impossible. At the same time, he was excoriated as all flash and no substance by the most high-minded critics (and not all of them are fools), most prominent among them the waspishly brilliant Virgil Thomson, who could never be accused of being a critic by default.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
They feared him. They treasured him. They abided him. They adored him. They bowed down to him. And if, because he left them awe-struck, Jascha Heifetz is beginning to sound like God, that's how his students regarded the late, great violinist. For while the public could certainly behold the wonder of his gifts in their generalized aspect, Nathan Milstein once said it took fellow fiddlers "to know how good he really is."
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
Jascha Heifetz, regarded as the greatest violin virtuoso since Paganini, died Thursday night at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, several weeks after undergoing brain surgery after a fall at his Beverly Hills home. He was 86. The intensely private musician had been hospitalized since Oct. 16 under the name Jim Hoyl, an alias he used as a composer of popular songs. A Cedars spokesman said the family had requested that no details of his illness be released.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | LEON WHITESON, Leon Whiteson writes regularly for the View section on architecture and design.
While sitting in his hilltop studio overlooking the Beverly Hills canyons, violinist Jascha Heifetz could look out the wide windows and imagine he was in Tuscany. The wooded slopes, punctuated by cypresses and the red tile roofs of Mediterranean-style villas, gave the musician a sense of calm. Heifetz's hexagonal studio, a redwood pavilion with a wood-shake roof, was dedicated to tranquillity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1995 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Jascha Heifetz (1900-1987) hasn't been out of the public conscious ness since his debut in St. Pe tersburg in 1911. And he never will be if RCA Victor, his longtime recording company, has anything to say about it. The company has now spoken more loudly and voluminously than ever with the always ear-boggling, often soul-stirring and on more than a few occasions exasperating "Heifetz Collection": 65 CDs selling at around $600 but soon to be broken up into more manageable one- and two-disc bits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1987
Violinist Jascha Heifetz, hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center after surgery to remove two blood clots in the brain, is improving. A hospital spokesman, Ron Wise, declined comment on Heifetz's illness, but a family member said the 86-year-old musician had suffered two falls at his Beverly Hills home that apparently caused the clots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As concertmaster for the orchestra that recorded the soundtrack for the movie "Psycho," classical violinist Israel Baker helped create a piece of pop culture that is regarded as one of Hollywood's most terrifying. He led the piercing attack of the violins that accompanies the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock film's chilling shower scene. He "was a renowned violinist and concertmaster in the Hollywood studio system" and was heard on dozens of movie scores, said Jon Burlingame, a film and music historian.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2009
I was pleased to read Laurie Winer's excellent article in Sunday's Calendar section ("At USC, Classes Beyond Canons," Oct. 11). There have been a number of articles this year in praise of the distinguished faculty that taught at the school, but so far one of the most important members has not, to my knowledge, been recognized for his singular efforts to bring so many of these artists to the school. The late Raymond Kendall was a dynamic and persuasive professor and administrator whose almost single-handed efforts brought Jascha Heifetz, Gregor Piatigorsky and William Primrose, among others, to the faculty.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
ON a brisk morning a few weeks ago inside downtown L.A.'s Colburn School of Performing Arts, Claire Hodgkins, 76, an Oregon-born violinist, teacher and former assistant to the late violin virtuoso Jascha Heifetz (1901-87), entered the free-standing Lloyd Wright studio that once sat on her mentor's Beverly Hills property and before long made a confession.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
Could there be a more appropriate Web address for the young philanthropist of the violin, Midori, than the one she has chosen, gotomidori.com? After more than 20 years onstage, she isn't just her generation's most giving, selfless musical figure, continually spawning successful outreach programs and teaching on both coasts (at the Manhattan School of Music and, more recently, at USC, where she holds the Jascha Heifetz chair).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN
Jascha Heifetz presents a frustrating challenge to would-be biographers. Although one of the most widely celebrated and recorded musicians of the 20th century, he was also intensely private, not to say secretive and even paranoid. The violinist bowed out of public life at the top of his form, with a final concert at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 1972, and spent the remaining 15 years of his life in growing isolation at his Los Angeles home.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearing the close of their annual summer residency in the L.A. area, Eduard Schmieder and the young, multinational, highly accomplished I Palpiti Chamber Orchestra observed the Jascha Heifetz centenary with an out-of-the-ordinary program--some of which referred directly to Heifetz. There was some unplanned drama at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you know anything about classical music, you know Jascha Heifetz. If you don't, here's all you need to know: Heifetz was the greatest violinist of the 20th century. Born 100 years ago in Lithuania (then part of Russia), Heifetz started on the violin at age 3 with the help of his father, a concertmaster for the local symphony. He gave his first public concert at age 7, a solo recital with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra at 10, and played Carnegie Hall at 16.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a teenager in the 1960s, violinist Pierre Amoyal was a student of Jascha Heifetz. So the Jascha Heifetz Society could claim a direct connection with Heifetz's legacy by having Amoyal close its first season at Azusa Pacific University's Munson Recital Hall on Sunday afternoon. But Amoyal made a key departure.
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