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Jascha Kessler

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January 26, 1986 | Kenneth Funsten, Funsten, and more than 40 other local poets and actors, recently participated in a complete reading of Homer's "Odyssey." The event, in Occidental College's outdoor bowl, was a benefit for Beyond Baroque in Venice. and
Jascha Kessler, born in New York City but for the last 25 years an inhabitant of Los Angeles, has not prepared his reader for this newest volume. True, the professor of English at UCLA has recently published poetry and wonderful translations of the Hungarian Rodnoti and the Iranian Farrokhzad. But none of that measures close to the humor and human perceptions of these fictions. Most of his 28 "classical" stories have been given the name of a Greek god or hero for title.
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HEALTH
September 28, 2009
Re: "Uninsured, Unafraid" (Sept. 21): It's very nice that J. Duncan Moore Jr. has decided that the $6,000 or so he is saving every year will pay for any care he might need in the future. Let me ask, if a drunk driver knocks you off your bike and you end up on a respirator, would you like me or other insured people or taxpayers to take care of you? Or if despite your good health, you suddenly find yourself diagnosed with cancer, would you like someone else to bail you out? The insurance pool works when it includes high- and low-risk people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007
JASCHA KESSLER misquoted the games keeper in "The Queen" [Letters, Feb. 25]. When asked who killed the stag, he replied, "An investment banker -- from London." It was not an American, as Kessler wrote. LAURA KAUFMAN Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007
JASCHA KESSLER misquoted the games keeper in "The Queen" [Letters, Feb. 25]. When asked who killed the stag, he replied, "An investment banker -- from London." It was not an American, as Kessler wrote. LAURA KAUFMAN Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
In a longish commentary (June 8) purporting to lament the commonplace pusillanimity of the clan-ruled Arab states who welcome, applaud and fete terrorists like Hamas, Henry Siegman commences with the usual Netanyahu-bashing and accuses Congress and the American Jewish community of pandering to what he considers anti-peaceniks. The clue to his hypocrisy may be found in his statement that "critics of U.S. policy should look at their own behavior first, for it is no less destructive of . . . peace . . . than is American behavior."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1999
Nora Gallagher, reviewing Cathleen Medwick's "Teresa of Avila," notes that the author herself has a Jewish background (Dec. 18). She approves enthusiastically of Medwick's biography, but never mentions that Teresa, born in 1515, was from a Converso family that had survived the catastrophic expulsions of 1492 and after. She doesn't note that Teresa's mother died when she was 15, after which she began her strange spiritual development. She doesn't note that the Vatican, under pressure from the Inquisition, forbade her to go on establishing successful convents, and closed quite a few of them, until the king(s)
OPINION
April 30, 2005
Re "The Soul of a Lost Cause," Column One, April 26: Ernesto Cardenal, the 80-year-old foolish, Marxist, Nicaraguan poetaster-priest rails today against quondam Sandinista dictator Daniel Ortega, now running for president again in his democratizing country, for having been corrupted and housing himself and his cronies in the mansions of the ousted Somoza thugocrats. But he conveniently overlooks the fact that the reward of his showpiece easy life was part of the country's takeover by the Soviet Union of that era, which posted police and intelligence agents visibly in the airport in Managua, and invisibly throughout the government offices, security and military.
HEALTH
September 28, 2009
Re: "Uninsured, Unafraid" (Sept. 21): It's very nice that J. Duncan Moore Jr. has decided that the $6,000 or so he is saving every year will pay for any care he might need in the future. Let me ask, if a drunk driver knocks you off your bike and you end up on a respirator, would you like me or other insured people or taxpayers to take care of you? Or if despite your good health, you suddenly find yourself diagnosed with cancer, would you like someone else to bail you out? The insurance pool works when it includes high- and low-risk people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
The ineffable professor Ruth Rosen has things upside down (and inside out), as usual ("A Physics Prof Drops a Bomb on Faux Left," Column Left, May 23), when she writes that the "cadre of Academic Emperors . . . claimed that their scholarship . . . constitute[s] a radical political movement and that they [are] the true theorists of the 'academic left.' " The case is rather that those termed "cultural theorists" and whom she thinks are exposed as jargon-ridden fools and charlatans are mostly folks of her own ilk. Indeed they are the true heirs of Rosen's "self-described progressive and feminist" left.
OPINION
June 17, 2012
Re "Attack of the goo-goos," Opinion, June 10 Joe Mathews could have added a real zinger had he mentioned that the open primary system in Louisiana once produced as its top two gubernatorial candidates a former grand wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and a former governor who went on to serve jail time for corruption. Jascha Kessler Santa Monica ALSO: Letters: Can women save Earth? Letters: Researching same-sex parents Letters: The bishops' contraception battle
OPINION
April 30, 2005
Re "The Soul of a Lost Cause," Column One, April 26: Ernesto Cardenal, the 80-year-old foolish, Marxist, Nicaraguan poetaster-priest rails today against quondam Sandinista dictator Daniel Ortega, now running for president again in his democratizing country, for having been corrupted and housing himself and his cronies in the mansions of the ousted Somoza thugocrats. But he conveniently overlooks the fact that the reward of his showpiece easy life was part of the country's takeover by the Soviet Union of that era, which posted police and intelligence agents visibly in the airport in Managua, and invisibly throughout the government offices, security and military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1999
Nora Gallagher, reviewing Cathleen Medwick's "Teresa of Avila," notes that the author herself has a Jewish background (Dec. 18). She approves enthusiastically of Medwick's biography, but never mentions that Teresa, born in 1515, was from a Converso family that had survived the catastrophic expulsions of 1492 and after. She doesn't note that Teresa's mother died when she was 15, after which she began her strange spiritual development. She doesn't note that the Vatican, under pressure from the Inquisition, forbade her to go on establishing successful convents, and closed quite a few of them, until the king(s)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
In a longish commentary (June 8) purporting to lament the commonplace pusillanimity of the clan-ruled Arab states who welcome, applaud and fete terrorists like Hamas, Henry Siegman commences with the usual Netanyahu-bashing and accuses Congress and the American Jewish community of pandering to what he considers anti-peaceniks. The clue to his hypocrisy may be found in his statement that "critics of U.S. policy should look at their own behavior first, for it is no less destructive of . . . peace . . . than is American behavior."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
The ineffable professor Ruth Rosen has things upside down (and inside out), as usual ("A Physics Prof Drops a Bomb on Faux Left," Column Left, May 23), when she writes that the "cadre of Academic Emperors . . . claimed that their scholarship . . . constitute[s] a radical political movement and that they [are] the true theorists of the 'academic left.' " The case is rather that those termed "cultural theorists" and whom she thinks are exposed as jargon-ridden fools and charlatans are mostly folks of her own ilk. Indeed they are the true heirs of Rosen's "self-described progressive and feminist" left.
BOOKS
January 26, 1986 | Kenneth Funsten, Funsten, and more than 40 other local poets and actors, recently participated in a complete reading of Homer's "Odyssey." The event, in Occidental College's outdoor bowl, was a benefit for Beyond Baroque in Venice. and
Jascha Kessler, born in New York City but for the last 25 years an inhabitant of Los Angeles, has not prepared his reader for this newest volume. True, the professor of English at UCLA has recently published poetry and wonderful translations of the Hungarian Rodnoti and the Iranian Farrokhzad. But none of that measures close to the humor and human perceptions of these fictions. Most of his 28 "classical" stories have been given the name of a Greek god or hero for title.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2003
I was glad to find in Calendar an excellent, extended profile by Johanna Keller of one of our leading American composers, Ned Rorem ("A Prolific Paradox," March 2). One small suggestion might be offered to amend her statement that Rorem "resisted the temptation to write serial music." Not so. In his first full-length opera, "The Anniversary," written in 1962 in Los Angeles at the Huntington Hartford Foundation, he set a tone row on the title page. The opera in two acts contains tone row architecture of the Rorem kind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001
John Balzar's amusing but critical remarks on Fay Weldon's forthcoming novel ("Sold! A Literary Soul, Now Mud," Commentary, Sept. 5) might have raised Dr. Samuel Johnson's eyebrows over 250 years ago. That literary giant himself growled that he counted any writer a great fool who did not write for money. Jane Austen said that although she liked fame, she loved "pewter" more. And those writers kept in groceries in Paris in the grim days before and after World War II, like Anais Nin, Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell, contracted to write pornographic novels for Maurice Girodias' Olympia Press of 10 chapters, 20 pages each, with two sex scenes per chapter, none of them repeated, making 20 "hot" episodes in all. At least they didn't sign their names to those books, let alone boast of it as Weldon does, laughing all the way, she hopes, to the bank.
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