Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJasco Chemical Corp
IN THE NEWS

Jasco Chemical Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 26, 1988
The Environmental Protection Agency ordered the Jasco Chemical Corp. to perform a thorough investigation of pollution at the site on which it operates in Mountain View, about 35 miles south of San Francisco. Ground water at the site is contaminated with a variety of solvents and the property is a candidate for the EPA's National Priorities List of the worst hazardous waste sites in the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit environmental group said Tuesday that it has settled a lawsuit that accused a Santa Ana chemical plant of failing to warn workers and residents of toxic emissions. California Community Health Advocates, a Bay Area nonprofit organization, sued Mountain View-based Jasco Chemical Corp. on Nov. 19 in Orange County Superior Court contending that the company was releasing tons of methylene chloride into the air from its Santa Ana plant in the 1000 block of Fuller Street.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit environmental group said Tuesday that it has settled a lawsuit that accused a Santa Ana chemical plant of failing to warn workers and residents of toxic emissions. California Community Health Advocates, a Bay Area nonprofit organization, sued Mountain View-based Jasco Chemical Corp. on Nov. 19 in Orange County Superior Court contending that the company was releasing tons of methylene chloride into the air from its Santa Ana plant in the 1000 block of Fuller Street.
NEWS
December 26, 1988
The Environmental Protection Agency ordered the Jasco Chemical Corp. to perform a thorough investigation of pollution at the site on which it operates in Mountain View, about 35 miles south of San Francisco. Ground water at the site is contaminated with a variety of solvents and the property is a candidate for the EPA's National Priorities List of the worst hazardous waste sites in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
In an effort to comply with stricter state laws on storing flammable chemicals underground, a Santa Ana corporation that makes household cleaners and solvents will be allowed to store chemicals in two above-ground storage tanks. The plan was approved recently by the Santa Ana City Council. The company, Jasco Chemical Corp., will store methanol and paint thinner in each of the two 10,000 gallon tanks at 1008 N. Fuller St.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fourteen brands of paint stripper, spot remover and water repellent products contain cancer-causing chemicals and are sold without the consumer warnings required by law, two environmental groups charged Thursday in an enforcement action filed under Proposition 65. The Environmental Defense Fund and the Sierra Club charged that some of the products contain a cancer risk 100,000 times higher than the standard set by California under Proposition 65, the antitoxics law passed by voters in 1986.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
Two pesticides used to preserve wood are still being sold by some area hardware and home improvement stores despite a federal ban on such sales imposed six weeks ago, a spot check by The Times has found. Due to concern about health risks, the federal Environmental Protection Agency announced last January that the chemicals--creosote and pentachlorophenol, or penta--would be banned from the consumer market and would be available only to certified pesticide applicators after Nov. 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2005 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of companies throughout the nation, including many in the Los Angeles region, would no longer have to provide the public with details of toxic chemicals they release into the environment under a Bush administration proposal to streamline the nation's environmental right-to-know law. For nearly 20 years, the national Toxics Release Inventory has allowed people to access detailed data about chemicals that are used and released in their neighborhoods.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|