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Jason Castro

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2008 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
The surprising and unlikely "American Idol" journey of Jason Castro ended Wednesday night in a week that saw nearly 51 million votes cast on television's most popular show. Falling just short of the final three, the soulful, dreadlocked crooner at first seemed far outside the typical "Idol" mold, but he quickly won over a large and hard-core following with an endearingly sweet, laid-back personality and a talent for offbeat comments.
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SCIENCE
September 20, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
It might seem that the range of scents humans can detect is infinite, but scientists have managed to sort them all into 10 basic categories, ranging from peppermint to pungent. The classifications are meant to be the olfactory equivalent of the five basic tastes (sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami).  To come up with the 10 scents, neuroscientists turned to a 30-year-old database that contained profiles of 144 odors.  Each odor was assessed by human subjects, who were given a list of 146 words and asked to rate how well each word described the odor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Richard Rushfield, Times Staff Writer
Wednesday night saw a tearful end to the "American Idol" journey of singer/songwriter Brooke White. The husky-voiced songstress broke the traditional "American Idol" mold by being the first performer in a low-key, Carly Simon-inspired vein to reach the top ranks of the competition, ultimately finishing in the fifth-place spot. Pared for elimination with Syesha Mercado, White was perhaps best known for her hyper-emotional reactions on past elimination nights. She stayed true to form, breaking into tears during her farewell song -- Neil Diamond's "I Am I Said" -- and retreating to the rear of the stage.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Richard Rushfield
At the aging San Diego Sports Arena, the crowd at the second show was perceptibly younger than the firmly middle-aged audience in the premiere show in Glendale, Ariz. The difference was immediately noticed by the performers as they made their way backstage after their sets.Although somewhat bleary from the first night's journey, the performers seemed to get a fresh burst of adrenaline from the crowd. First up, Chikezie, who came backstage soaking wet from his energetic set but smiling broadly at how it had gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
I never thought I would have occasion to feel sorry for Neil Diamond, but "American Idol" always seems to introduce me to new and uninvited emotions. Tuesday's show, devoted to the songbook of the estimable Tin Pan Alley rocker, did him a great injustice -- and it didn't do much for the tremulous Top Five Idols, either. Maybe they're still processing the slaying of Carly last week, or perhaps they'd gotten into whatever made Paula render judgment on Jason Castro's second song before he sang it -- but with one exception, the contenders seemed a little, well, glazed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Music Writer
We've hit a strange spot in this year's "American Idol" saga, a sort of creeping lull that bodes of something sinister. It's the moment on the battlefield when four soldiers are sharing a cigarette, and kaboom! A grenade goes off. The mood, I think, isn't just a matter of real favorites departing, now that the finale is almost here. The question hangs in the air: Is "Idol" working? Or do dropping ratings and the strange enervation of the show's Final Four contenders suggest that it has lost the potential to tap into pop's fundamental pheromone, cited again and again by exhausted "Idol" strivers as a goal: simple, fleeting fun?
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Richard Rushfield
At the aging San Diego Sports Arena, the crowd at the second show was perceptibly younger than the firmly middle-aged audience in the premiere show in Glendale, Ariz. The difference was immediately noticed by the performers as they made their way backstage after their sets.Although somewhat bleary from the first night's journey, the performers seemed to get a fresh burst of adrenaline from the crowd. First up, Chikezie, who came backstage soaking wet from his energetic set but smiling broadly at how it had gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
There are two ways a celebrity summit like Wednesday night's "Idol Gives Back" charity telecast can achieve razzle-dazzle nirvana: through staged spontaneity or grandeur. When the first occurs, as when Fergie did flips across the floor while rocking out with Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, we viewers are plunged into the fun of the moment. Unexpected gestures by our favorite stars collapse the distance between us and them. In the second case -- as when Carrie Underwood, perched on a stool in an iridescent Farah Angsana gown, offered up George Michael's ballad "Praying for Time" with grace, compassion and dignity -- we are lifted up beyond the day's irritations and momentarily made better.
SCIENCE
September 20, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
It might seem that the range of scents humans can detect is infinite, but scientists have managed to sort them all into 10 basic categories, ranging from peppermint to pungent. The classifications are meant to be the olfactory equivalent of the five basic tastes (sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami).  To come up with the 10 scents, neuroscientists turned to a 30-year-old database that contained profiles of 144 odors.  Each odor was assessed by human subjects, who were given a list of 146 words and asked to rate how well each word described the odor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Richard Rushfield, Times Staff Writer
Tuesday night, in taking on the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber, "American Idol" came face to face with its spiritual creator, the man who elevated vocal performance to the level of spectacle. History has been filled with singing competitions, but until Lloyd Webber transformed the stage, the idea of singing as single combat -- a combat to master one's soul and to enslave an audience -- would have been impossible. But though "American Idol" may have been shaped in the passed-down image of the master, the show has needed time to work its way back to its creator.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Music Writer
We've hit a strange spot in this year's "American Idol" saga, a sort of creeping lull that bodes of something sinister. It's the moment on the battlefield when four soldiers are sharing a cigarette, and kaboom! A grenade goes off. The mood, I think, isn't just a matter of real favorites departing, now that the finale is almost here. The question hangs in the air: Is "Idol" working? Or do dropping ratings and the strange enervation of the show's Final Four contenders suggest that it has lost the potential to tap into pop's fundamental pheromone, cited again and again by exhausted "Idol" strivers as a goal: simple, fleeting fun?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2008 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
The surprising and unlikely "American Idol" journey of Jason Castro ended Wednesday night in a week that saw nearly 51 million votes cast on television's most popular show. Falling just short of the final three, the soulful, dreadlocked crooner at first seemed far outside the typical "Idol" mold, but he quickly won over a large and hard-core following with an endearingly sweet, laid-back personality and a talent for offbeat comments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Richard Rushfield, Times Staff Writer
Wednesday night saw a tearful end to the "American Idol" journey of singer/songwriter Brooke White. The husky-voiced songstress broke the traditional "American Idol" mold by being the first performer in a low-key, Carly Simon-inspired vein to reach the top ranks of the competition, ultimately finishing in the fifth-place spot. Pared for elimination with Syesha Mercado, White was perhaps best known for her hyper-emotional reactions on past elimination nights. She stayed true to form, breaking into tears during her farewell song -- Neil Diamond's "I Am I Said" -- and retreating to the rear of the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
I never thought I would have occasion to feel sorry for Neil Diamond, but "American Idol" always seems to introduce me to new and uninvited emotions. Tuesday's show, devoted to the songbook of the estimable Tin Pan Alley rocker, did him a great injustice -- and it didn't do much for the tremulous Top Five Idols, either. Maybe they're still processing the slaying of Carly last week, or perhaps they'd gotten into whatever made Paula render judgment on Jason Castro's second song before he sang it -- but with one exception, the contenders seemed a little, well, glazed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Richard Rushfield, Times Staff Writer
Tuesday night, in taking on the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber, "American Idol" came face to face with its spiritual creator, the man who elevated vocal performance to the level of spectacle. History has been filled with singing competitions, but until Lloyd Webber transformed the stage, the idea of singing as single combat -- a combat to master one's soul and to enslave an audience -- would have been impossible. But though "American Idol" may have been shaped in the passed-down image of the master, the show has needed time to work its way back to its creator.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
There are two ways a celebrity summit like Wednesday night's "Idol Gives Back" charity telecast can achieve razzle-dazzle nirvana: through staged spontaneity or grandeur. When the first occurs, as when Fergie did flips across the floor while rocking out with Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, we viewers are plunged into the fun of the moment. Unexpected gestures by our favorite stars collapse the distance between us and them. In the second case -- as when Carrie Underwood, perched on a stool in an iridescent Farah Angsana gown, offered up George Michael's ballad "Praying for Time" with grace, compassion and dignity -- we are lifted up beyond the day's irritations and momentarily made better.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009
Re: "Ukuleles strike chord online," July 25: I really liked your article on the rise of popularity for ukuleles. My aunt would entertain us for hours strumming tunes on her ukuleles on balmy summer days. The instrument also gained popularity after Jason Castro sang and played the ukulele for Israel Kamakawiwo'ole's version of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" on "American Idol" in 2008. Catherine Mims Yamaguchi La Mirada
SPORTS
September 17, 2013 | Wire Reports
Toronto Blue Jays slugger Edwin Encarnacion needs surgery on his left wrist and will sit out the remainder of the season. All-Star left-hander Brett Cecil is also being shut down by the Blue Jays for the final 13 games because of a sore elbow. Encarnacion sat out four games last week because of soreness in the wrist. He returned to play all three games of a weekend series against Baltimore, but had only one hit in 12 at-bats. Encarnacion ranks third in the majors with 36 home runs and his 104 runs batted in are the fourth-highest total.
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