Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJason Cottle
IN THE NEWS

Jason Cottle

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a red-vested waitress named Theresa recently served actor Jason Cottle French fries and lemonade at a Los Angeles Denny's, let the record show: He left a good tip. Cottle plays a dozen different roles in the Mark Taper Forum's current production of "Nickel and Dimed," which is based on Barbara Ehrenreich's first-person account about trying to make ends meet on a minimum wage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a red-vested waitress named Theresa recently served actor Jason Cottle French fries and lemonade at a Los Angeles Denny's, let the record show: He left a good tip. Cottle plays a dozen different roles in the Mark Taper Forum's current production of "Nickel and Dimed," which is based on Barbara Ehrenreich's first-person account about trying to make ends meet on a minimum wage.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | ANN VAN DER VEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Should the theater be appropriated to promote the interests of politics, religion, advertising or anything whatever, except art? One of the functions of the critic is to raise that question. Patrons arriving at the Studio Theater are confronted with huge placards exhibiting blown-up newspaper and magazine articles entitled "The Roots of Skinhead Violence," "The American Neo-Nazi Movement Today" and "Peril from an Imperial President."
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A metal cart filled with costumes is wheeled onto center stage. In full view of the audience, a youthful cast in modern dress dives into the pile, donning robes, scarves and flowing fabrics that vaguely suggest the garments of ancient Greece. The illusion is never complete, however--blue jeans, ties and T-shirts poking through tunics are a far cry from the ritualized masks from which the original cast bellowed Aeschylus' verse to enormous amphitheaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its current offering, "Nickel and Dimed," the Mark Taper Forum has done a daring thing: It has put a play on its main stage that attacks the economic privilege of 90% of the people who will see it.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In the time of your life, live--so that in that wondrous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it," wrote William Saroyan in his preface to "The Time of Your Life." True to this manifesto, Saroyan's sprawling, not-conventionally dramatic drama is less of a play than an unabashed homage to romantic sensibility. Of course, he wrote it in 1939.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The streets were dark with something more than night," wrote Raymond Chandler of the shadow world in which his '30s and '40s Philip Marlowe detective stories were set. It was a world of seedy shamuses, cops on the take and deadbeats on the fast hustle. People didn't walk into a scene, they "drifted." Life was as cheap as a chalk stripe suit. And everyone was a loner. It must have been a love affair with Chandler's world, and even more with his language, that prompted Robert G.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Michael Ordona; Kevin Thomas; Robert Abele; Mark Olsen
"Being a centerfold is the highest and most prestigious honor there is," uber-blond Shelley earnestly declares. "It says, 'I'm naked in the middle of a magazine. Unfold me!' " Such is the glazed-eyed charm of "The House Bunny," which is factory made, nothing new . . . and really funny. The familiar plot finds a misfit sorority about to lose its house unless it can suddenly become popular. Enter Shelley, a sweetly vacant exile from the paradise called the Playboy mansion, who is just spunky and sexy enough to solve everyone's problems.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|