Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJason Epstein
IN THE NEWS

Jason Epstein

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Epstein, a founder and for 43 years co-editor of the New York Review of Books, died of lung cancer Friday at her home in New York City, the magazine announced. She was 76. "She was working up until the last few weeks," said Robert Silvers, her co-editor since the publication was founded in 1963. Silvers will continue as the magazine's editor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Epstein, a founder and for 43 years co-editor of the New York Review of Books, died of lung cancer Friday at her home in New York City, the magazine announced. She was 76. "She was working up until the last few weeks," said Robert Silvers, her co-editor since the publication was founded in 1963. Silvers will continue as the magazine's editor.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The first rumblings he heard connecting his name to the new National Book Awards medal for "distinguished contributions to American letters" reminded Jason Epstein of an episode of "The Honeymooners," the old Jackie Gleason television show. That would be the scene in which Ralph Kramden learns that one of the members of the Raccoons, his lodge, is about to receive a special citation for meritorious service.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Gore Vidal's 1981 bestselling novel, "Creation," the narrator--imperial Persian emissary Cyrus Spitama--describes his young nephew thusly: "Democritus is studying philosophy here at Athens. This means that he delights in quarrels." So, too, does Vidal, who is as famous for his capacity for lasting animosities as he is for his acidic tongue.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Gore Vidal's 1981 bestselling novel, "Creation," the narrator--imperial Persian emissary Cyrus Spitama--describes his young nephew thusly: "Democritus is studying philosophy here at Athens. This means that he delights in quarrels." So, too, does Vidal, who is as famous for his capacity for lasting animosities as he is for his acidic tongue.
BOOKS
February 25, 2001 | RICHARD SEAVER, Richard Seaver, an editor and publisher for more than 40 years, is president of Arcade Publishing, an independent house distributed by AOL Time Warner. His many past posts include managing editor of Evergreen Review, editor-in-chief of Grove Press and publisher of the trade division of Holt, Rinehart & Winston (while it was a subsidiary of CBS Inc.). He has edited and published many authors, including Samuel Beckett, John Berger, William Burroughs, E.M. Cioran, Jean Genet, Eugene Ionesco and Andrei Makine. He is also the translator of Pauline Reage's "Story of O" and the works of the Marquis de Sade, among other writers
Book publishing is in the throes of enormous change, partly because of a major shift in corporate structures over the last few decades but mainly the result of new technologies whose cultural influence, in the words of Jason Epstein, "promises to be no less revolutionary than the introduction of movable type. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Streaming music pioneer Rhapsody, one of the first digital music companies to offer access to songs through monthly subscriptions, has cut its staff by 15%. Also, its president, Jon Irwin, is stepping down and will continue as a strategic advisor.  Rhapsody International, the service's parent, said Monday that the layoffs were concurrent with New York investment firm Columbus Nova Technology Partners' taking a large share in the company....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Swann Gallery in New York is holding a large auction of 20th century illustrations that features the works of Maurice Sendak. There are many books by Sendak and those he illustrated, some original sketches, signed books and a first edition of "Where the Wild Things Are," with an inscription that includes a drawing of one of his Wild Thing monsters. "Dear Reed -- This certainly looks like a first edition -- it has all the wrong colors in the right places!" Sendak wrote beside the figure of a dancing Wild Thing.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | JACK MILES, Miles, The Times' book editor, was elected president of the National Book Critics' Circle last week in New York
Two years ago, when Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past was making headlines, the Los Angeles Times published an unusually thoughtful review, one that compared Waldheim's amnesia with the amnesia of Austria itself and contrasted it to West Germany's " Vergangenheitsbewaltigung-- a truthful and cathartic confrontation with the unhappy and long-suppressed past." The German word came to the reviewer honestly enough: He was born in Vienna.
BOOKS
November 26, 1989 | DOUGLAS L. DUTTON, Dutton, who teaches music at Los Angeles City College, is the owner of Dutton's Brentwood Book Store. and
In a famous New Yorker cartoon, a small book, sprouting arms and legs, having jumped from its place on the shelf, plaintively looks up at its owner, placidly watching television, and demands "Read me!"
BOOKS
February 25, 2001 | RICHARD SEAVER, Richard Seaver, an editor and publisher for more than 40 years, is president of Arcade Publishing, an independent house distributed by AOL Time Warner. His many past posts include managing editor of Evergreen Review, editor-in-chief of Grove Press and publisher of the trade division of Holt, Rinehart & Winston (while it was a subsidiary of CBS Inc.). He has edited and published many authors, including Samuel Beckett, John Berger, William Burroughs, E.M. Cioran, Jean Genet, Eugene Ionesco and Andrei Makine. He is also the translator of Pauline Reage's "Story of O" and the works of the Marquis de Sade, among other writers
Book publishing is in the throes of enormous change, partly because of a major shift in corporate structures over the last few decades but mainly the result of new technologies whose cultural influence, in the words of Jason Epstein, "promises to be no less revolutionary than the introduction of movable type. . . .
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The first rumblings he heard connecting his name to the new National Book Awards medal for "distinguished contributions to American letters" reminded Jason Epstein of an episode of "The Honeymooners," the old Jackie Gleason television show. That would be the scene in which Ralph Kramden learns that one of the members of the Raccoons, his lodge, is about to receive a special citation for meritorious service.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | DIANE SEO AND TANYA LOH
For all aspiring actors and actresses, ambitious future presidents and other would-be members of the truly rich and famous, we hope you weren't too humbled by not being invited to down your share of the bubbly at Time magazine's humongous bash in New York last week. The most notable of notables, the elite of the elite, the A-plus of the A-list, these uber-celebrities gathered to commemorate the magazine's 75th anniversary.
OPINION
October 15, 2006 | Lloyd Grove, Until last week, Lloyd Grove wrote Lowdown, a gossip column in the New York Daily News.
'WE WON'T rest until we send you back to Washington on a stretcher." I hadn't even written my first word for the Daily News, and already the gossip gang-bangers at the rival New York Post were unsheathing their imaginary switchblades. That was a little over three years ago. Manhattan real estate baron Mortimer B. Zuckerman had recruited me from the Washington Post to start a new franchise, called Lowdown, at his venerable tabloid.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|