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Jason Kay

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1997 | CHEO HODARI COKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jason Kay, lead singer of the R&B quintet Jamiroquai, may be a white Englishman, but you'd swear from his records that he grew up in America raised in the Baptist soul tradition. His voice alternately combines the sensuousness of R. Kelly's with the melodic grace of Stevie Wonder's. But somehow, he remains his own man. After scoring Top 10 albums everywhere from France to Japan, Kay's group now has its sights set on the United States--and things are progressing well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2006 | Jonathan Abrams and Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writers
Jason McKay decided he wanted to be a fireman at the age of 3, when he accidentally burned his finger on a match and realized the dangers of fire. McKay made good on that dream, and on Friday more than 1,000 friends, family members and colleagues came to the High Desert Church in Victorville to honor the life of the 27-year-old U.S. Forest Service firefighter killed in last week's wildfire in Riverside County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
'Excuse me, what was the question again?" The first time Jason Kay, the leader of the British soul-pop band Jamiroquai, loses his place during an interview because a pretty woman is walking by, you dismiss it as a gag by a playful pop star. As he leans forward in his chair on the patio of a West Hollywood hotel and watches the woman until she moves out of sight, he sure seems to be exaggerating.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
'Excuse me, what was the question again?" The first time Jason Kay, the leader of the British soul-pop band Jamiroquai, loses his place during an interview because a pretty woman is walking by, you dismiss it as a gag by a playful pop star. As he leans forward in his chair on the patio of a West Hollywood hotel and watches the woman until she moves out of sight, he sure seems to be exaggerating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2006 | Jonathan Abrams and Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writers
Jason McKay decided he wanted to be a fireman at the age of 3, when he accidentally burned his finger on a match and realized the dangers of fire. McKay made good on that dream, and on Friday more than 1,000 friends, family members and colleagues came to the High Desert Church in Victorville to honor the life of the 27-year-old U.S. Forest Service firefighter killed in last week's wildfire in Riverside County.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN
A concert by the young English band Jamiroquai at the Roxy on Monday might have provided the answer to the mystery about what happened to British rock: While America's future Pearl Jammers and Stone Temple Pilots were learning riffs off their older siblings' Sabbath and Zep albums a few years ago, their English counterparts were apparently studying the Average White Band and Rufus.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Alex Pham
THQ Inc. has tapped veteran game designer and former game studio executive Jason Rubin to be president, the Agoura Hills video game publisher announced Tuesday. Rubin's appointment comes amid a top-to-bottom reorganization that the financially beleaguered company initiated late last year when it became apparent that a number of major game titles, including uDraw, would miss sales projections. Rubin's arrival at THQ coincides with an announcement that Danny Bilson, THQ's executive vice president of core games, was leaving "to pursue other interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Despite Jamiroquai's obvious debt to the '70s-era soul/pop/funk of Stevie Wonder, the English quintet's concert on Friday at the Hollywood Palladium was more about celebrating its roots than worshiping the past. Frontman Jason Kay's hip-hop attire and mannerisms gave the nearly two-hour performance a '90s sensibility, and his lyrics addressed such au courant subjects as cloning and legalizing marijuana.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
The energetic audience at Jamiroquai's concert Wednesday at the Greek Theatre danced for nearly two hours with the kind of spirit you found at shows by such pop-soul masters as Stevie Wonder and Earth, Wind & Fire. Quite a compliment--though it would be a bigger one if the English band's own songs weren't such echoes of those masters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2009 | David Kelly
Raymond Lee Oyler, the Beaumont mechanic convicted of setting the 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters, was sentenced to death Friday by a judge who said the serial arsonist had set out to "create havoc." "He became more and more proficient," said Riverside County Superior Court Judge W. Charles Morgan. "He knew young men and women would put their lives on the line to protect people and property, yet he continued anyway."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1997 | CHEO HODARI COKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jason Kay, lead singer of the R&B quintet Jamiroquai, may be a white Englishman, but you'd swear from his records that he grew up in America raised in the Baptist soul tradition. His voice alternately combines the sensuousness of R. Kelly's with the melodic grace of Stevie Wonder's. But somehow, he remains his own man. After scoring Top 10 albums everywhere from France to Japan, Kay's group now has its sights set on the United States--and things are progressing well.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2000 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Guy Oseary is known as the Maverick Records music executive who inked Alanis Morissette, the Deftones and Prodigy, but a decade ago he was a teenager eager to turn his love of rock into a career. He was already bold, though, so it's no surprise that one night he blithely approached former Clash member Mick Jones at a Park Plaza Hotel party. The question the young Oseary asked the punk-rock hero, however, was a bit odd. "I said, 'I always heard that someone in the Clash was Jewish, is that true?'
SPORTS
August 29, 2002 | Robyn Norwood
If baseball players strike Friday, it could mean Ernie Harwell called his last game Wednesday night after 42 years behind the microphone for the Detroit Tigers. The Tigers are off today. Harwell, retiring after the season at 84, had no way of knowing Wednesday if there will be a strike, or how many games one might cost, so he decided simply to go about his business. What a business it has been.
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