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Jason Project

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November 30, 1997 | JOE WHEELAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's back to the ocean bottom for the Jason Project's doughty child "argonauts," who this year walked among Yellowstone's bubbling geysers and watched scientists crawl into an ice cave above a volcano in Iceland. During Jason IX next April, America's science-classroom hit will return to its most popular setting--Davy Jones' locker. Once again, millions of skeptical fourth- through 10th-graders may discover that science can be cool.
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NEWS
November 30, 1997 | JOE WHEELAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's back to the ocean bottom for the Jason Project's doughty child "argonauts," who this year walked among Yellowstone's bubbling geysers and watched scientists crawl into an ice cave above a volcano in Iceland. During Jason IX next April, America's science-classroom hit will return to its most popular setting--Davy Jones' locker. Once again, millions of skeptical fourth- through 10th-graders may discover that science can be cool.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
Although they were seated comfortably in an Irvine auditorium, a group of students found themselves 7,000 feet below the surface of the ocean Monday, exploring a remote world where creatures survive without sunlight. Here, far below the surface of the Sea of Cortez between the shores of Baja California Sur and Mexico, boiling fluids bubble from cracks in the ocean floor and tube worms somehow manage to survive in the crevices surrounding the hydrothermal vents.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | LISA MASCARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An underwater robot wiggles its tiny, boxlike body 60 feet underwater to peer over volcanic terrain, while another focuses in on feeding sharks and a third quietly eyes the coral and waits to zoom in on the ocean creatures' next stir. Starting Monday and continuing for two weeks, half a million children in 20 locations across North America will sit transfixed before three huge TVs, watching live transmissions of the robots' underwater exploration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
Although they were seated comfortably in an Irvine auditorium, a group of students found themselves 7,000 feet below the surface of the ocean Monday, exploring a remote world where creatures survive without sunlight. Here, far below the surface of the Sea of Cortez between the shores of Baja California Sur and Mexico, boiling fluids bubble from cracks in the ocean floor and tube worms somehow manage to survive in the crevices surrounding the hydrothermal vents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
So how does an undersea explorer top finding long lost ships like the Titanic and the Bismarck? How about using underwater robots to help solve the world's energy problems or discover the origins of life, while simultaneously turning 500,000 schoolchildren into research scientists. With the help of the Dana Point Marine Institute, Bob Ballard intends to do exactly that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
For a science-minded 15-year-old like Catherine Price, the opportunity is a golden one. Travel next month to explore the seas off Baja California, rub shoulders with acclaimed ocean researchers and have the whole experience telecast to eager students watching around the country. And to what does Price, a Costa Mesa High School sophomore, credit her good fortune? Worms. Big, three-foot worms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, a picture in a science textbook is not enough. Certainly not when it's compared to an electronic field trip to an ocean bed where coral glimmers, sea lions frolic and schools of fish shimmy along the sand. With the help of three giant television monitors and satellite link-ups, nearly 800 Orange County children gathered at UC Irvine's Beckman Center on Monday to embark on a video adventure to the Galapagos Islands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1992
In response to "Rail Commuter Era Begins in L.A.," Oct. 27: I'm so excited about what's happening in Los Angeles. Every time I pick up the paper and see an article about our emerging transportation systems, I quickly read for new and updated information. Your article "Metrolink's Start Puts 3 Future Transit Hubs in Its Path" is right on time. I know from what I see at 5 a.m. each week day morning (gridlock) that Metrolink will be a tremendous success. We commuters are ready for a change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
For a science-minded 15-year-old like Catherine Price, the opportunity is a golden one. Travel next month to explore the seas off Baja California, rub shoulders with acclaimed ocean researchers and have the whole experience telecast to eager students watching around the country. And to what does Price, a Costa Mesa High School sophomore, credit her good fortune? Worms. Big, three-foot worms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
So how does an undersea explorer top finding long lost ships like the Titanic and the Bismarck? How about using underwater robots to help solve the world's energy problems or discover the origins of life, while simultaneously turning 500,000 schoolchildren into research scientists. With the help of the Dana Point Marine Institute, Bob Ballard intends to do exactly that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1992
In response to "Rail Commuter Era Begins in L.A.," Oct. 27: I'm so excited about what's happening in Los Angeles. Every time I pick up the paper and see an article about our emerging transportation systems, I quickly read for new and updated information. Your article "Metrolink's Start Puts 3 Future Transit Hubs in Its Path" is right on time. I know from what I see at 5 a.m. each week day morning (gridlock) that Metrolink will be a tremendous success. We commuters are ready for a change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, a picture in a science textbook is not enough. Certainly not when it's compared to an electronic field trip to an ocean bed where coral glimmers, sea lions frolic and schools of fish shimmy along the sand. With the help of three giant television monitors and satellite link-ups, nearly 800 Orange County children gathered at UC Irvine's Beckman Center on Monday to embark on a video adventure to the Galapagos Islands.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | LISA MASCARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An underwater robot wiggles its tiny, boxlike body 60 feet underwater to peer over volcanic terrain, while another focuses in on feeding sharks and a third quietly eyes the coral and waits to zoom in on the ocean creatures' next stir. Starting Monday and continuing for two weeks, half a million children in 20 locations across North America will sit transfixed before three huge TVs, watching live transmissions of the robots' underwater exploration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
A Lake Forest teacher has been selected to accompany a group of students on an expedition to an ocean reef off the Central American country of Belize, one of only six teachers in the country to participate in the special project. Linda Cotter, who teaches sixth grade at Lake Forest Elementary School, will be the only teacher from California in the expedition, part of this year's JASON Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | Crystal Carreon, (714) 966-7835
Developers of Pointe Anaheim, a proposed $450-million hotel-and-entertainment center to be located across the street from Disneyland, purchased their first piece of property this week. Terms were not disclosed. Project officials plan to temporarily use the 30,000-square-foot property near the intersection of Clementine Street and Katella Avenue as community offices, said Jason Grange, project spokesman. The developers plan to spend $75 million to buy nine parcels from 15 property owners.
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