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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades, who became more celebrated in Europe than in the United States for elaborate installations that broke down conventional walls between performance and conventional art, died Tuesday. He was 41. Rhoades was transported from his home early Tuesday morning to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy is pending. Friends and colleagues reached Wednesday expressed shock at the artist's unexpected death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006 | Diane Haithman
The Aug. 1 death of Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades, 41, was caused by accidental drug intoxication and heart disease, according to the Los Angeles County coroner's office. That determination was made by a Sept. 8 autopsy received by the coroner's office earlier this week. The department's Capt. Ed Winter said Friday that his office had not yet received a list of medications that contributed to the artists' death but that the autopsy indicated it was "not a suicide."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
When Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades died suddenly this month at age 41, most published obituaries said the cause of death was unknown, pending autopsy results. Others cited the cause as heart failure, per one of Rhoades' primary art dealers. For this enigmatic artist -- known for large-scale installations that often incorporated performance or interactive aspects -- postmortem rumors about a fast-lane lifestyle seemed to overwhelm the discussion about his art.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
When Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades died suddenly this month at age 41, most published obituaries said the cause of death was unknown, pending autopsy results. Others cited the cause as heart failure, per one of Rhoades' primary art dealers. For this enigmatic artist -- known for large-scale installations that often incorporated performance or interactive aspects -- postmortem rumors about a fast-lane lifestyle seemed to overwhelm the discussion about his art.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006 | Diane Haithman
The Aug. 1 death of Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades, 41, was caused by accidental drug intoxication and heart disease, according to the Los Angeles County coroner's office. That determination was made by a Sept. 8 autopsy received by the coroner's office earlier this week. The department's Capt. Ed Winter said Friday that his office had not yet received a list of medications that contributed to the artists' death but that the autopsy indicated it was "not a suicide."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2006 | Elizabeth Khuri, Times Staff Writer
The guests arrived one by one, the wealthy art collector and the museum director and the others, all spilling into a 4,000-square-foot L.A. studio filled with tungsten, black lights and piles of paraphernalia from EBay. At first glance, it looked like a haphazard reproduction of a Middle Eastern bazaar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
Works by Los Angeles-based artists will loom large and audacious in an auction of contemporary art from the collection of Swiss dealer Pierre Huber on Monday night at Christie's New York. Paul McCarthy's "Bear and Rabbit on a Rock," a 9-foot-tall sculpture of joyfully copulating stuffed animals, is expected to fetch between $1 million and $1.5 million. Mike Kelley's "Test Room," an installation inspired by a psychologist's laboratory, is valued at $800,000 to $1.2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | PAUL YOUNG
Pablo Neruda remarked that "a bibliophile of little means is likely to suffer often. Books don't slip from his hands but fly past him through the air as high as birds, as high as prices." Expect a lot of that at next weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, which brings together publishers from around the world. Many debut or announce big, beautiful books on L.A. artists, including Jorge Pardo, Jason Rhoades, Tim Hawkinson, Barbara Bloom, Frances Stark, Doug Aitken and Pat O'Neill.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anything overwhelming commands attention by virtue of sensory overload: too big, too loud, too much. It's a cheat only if there's nowhere else the work wants to (or can) go, as with Frank Stella's hyperbolic reliefs of the 1980s, Robert Longo's sculptural hysterics and many of Cady Noland's aggressively low-brow scatter pieces. Jason Rhoades' new work overwhelms but does so as a means to an end.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Like most major art museums, Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art gets a rush of art gifts at the end of each year, when collectors typically make tax-deductible contributions. It now appears that 1999 was a particularly good year for MOCA--and not only because of tax breaks. Of the 120 works added to the museum's collection last year, 17 pieces were donated in honor of Jeremy Strick, who succeeded director Richard Koshalek last July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles artist Jason Rhoades, who became more celebrated in Europe than in the United States for elaborate installations that broke down conventional walls between performance and conventional art, died Tuesday. He was 41. Rhoades was transported from his home early Tuesday morning to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy is pending. Friends and colleagues reached Wednesday expressed shock at the artist's unexpected death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2006 | Elizabeth Khuri, Times Staff Writer
The guests arrived one by one, the wealthy art collector and the museum director and the others, all spilling into a 4,000-square-foot L.A. studio filled with tungsten, black lights and piles of paraphernalia from EBay. At first glance, it looked like a haphazard reproduction of a Middle Eastern bazaar.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large-scale sculpture with an equally large-scale title--Nancy Rubins' 2001 work "Chas' Stainless Steel, Mark Thompson's Airplane Parts, About 1000 Pounds of Stainless Steel Wire and Gagosian's Beverly Hills Space," fashioned from used airplane parts--is among the artworks acquired through gifts and purchases by the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in 2001.
NEWS
February 22, 2000
Ocean View Coach: Steve Barrett 1999 record: 14-12 League record: 8-7 The Seahawks are young and inexperienced, according to Coach Steve Barrett. "We are improving every day within our system and should be a factor in 2001 and 2002," he said. Three starters return. They are junior pitcher Tyler Kreil, senior second baseman Jeremy Nicholson and senior pitcher/shortstop Mike Harris. Harris batted .260 and had a 2-4 record last year. Kreu, a first-team all-league selection, was 2-5 with a 2.
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