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Jason Robards

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December 24, 1995
When Charles Champlin writes in "In the Arena" (Book Review Oct. 15) that Jason Robards gave a terrible performance in "Antony and Cleopatra," he is confusing that film with "Julius Caesar," in which Robards played Brutus opposite Charlton Heston's Mark Antony in 1970. Robards could handle Shakespeare; I saw him give a dynamic performance as Hotspur at Stratford, Conn., but he was indeed terrible as Brutus, reading his lines metronomically. As for the failure of Heston's film of "Antony and Cleopatra" (1973)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2011
George Green Lyricist and songwriter George Green, 59, who wrote lyrics for some of John Mellencamp's biggest hits, as well as songs for Barbra Streisand and others, died Sunday in Albuquerque of a rapid-forming lung cancer, his wife, Kathryn, told the Herald-Times of Bloomington, Ind. Green was a boyhood friend of Mellencamp growing up in Seymour, Ind., and lived in Bloomington for many years before moving to New Mexico in...
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NEWS
December 27, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two-time Academy Award winner Jason Robards, who had a distinguished acting career on stage, screen and television, died Tuesday after a long struggle with cancer. He was 78 and died at Bridgeport Hospital in Bridgeport, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2000 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The greatest actors have the power to create such moments on stage or on screen that the viewer, remembering, can't quite be sure whether it is the actor or the character who comes to mind. For many of us, Jason Robards, who died Tuesday at the age of 78, was as good and credible a newspaperman as any of us ever knew. As Ben Bradlee, the high-powered editor at the Washington Post in "All the President's Men," Robards seemed an editor to the marrow of his bones and the soles of his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2000 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The greatest actors have the power to create such moments on stage or on screen that the viewer, remembering, can't quite be sure whether it is the actor or the character who comes to mind. For many of us, Jason Robards, who died Tuesday at the age of 78, was as good and credible a newspaperman as any of us ever knew. As Ben Bradlee, the high-powered editor at the Washington Post in "All the President's Men," Robards seemed an editor to the marrow of his bones and the soles of his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Jason Robards Reads William Kennedy's 'Ironweed'." Newman (two cassettes). Robards' hoarse, down-home voice, hinting of hard days and long nights, is perfect casting for Kennedy's Francis Whelan, the Albany alcoholic who once played third base in Toronto and has come home after 22 years to confront the living and the dead from his past. Whelan and his comical-tragic pals earned Kennedy's novel a wholly deserved Pulitzer prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Reunion" (at the Fine Arts and Town & Country), a compelling film of remarkable subtlety and insight, withholds its full meaning until its conclusion. Yet from the start we are caught up in the destiny of its hero, a rich, older Manhattan businessman (Jason Robards) whom we meet relaxing in Central Park while a child, presumably his granddaughter, plays nearby. Sitting in the sun, he is washed over by memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | CHIP CREWS, WASHINGTON POST
"Oh," says the cab driver, suddenly interested. "This is Mr. Robards' house." The reaction is understandable, for the big brick structure, no less than the career that purchased it, commands respect even in this hyper-affluent New England town. Jason Robards and his wife, Lois, have lived here for 26 years, and the six acres, the beautiful lawns and trees, the broad oceanfront view, tell of solidity, prosperity and peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2011
George Green Lyricist and songwriter George Green, 59, who wrote lyrics for some of John Mellencamp's biggest hits, as well as songs for Barbra Streisand and others, died Sunday in Albuquerque of a rapid-forming lung cancer, his wife, Kathryn, told the Herald-Times of Bloomington, Ind. Green was a boyhood friend of Mellencamp growing up in Seymour, Ind., and lived in Bloomington for many years before moving to New Mexico in...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | LOUIS SHEAFFER and \o7, Sheaffer is the author of "O'Neill: Son and Artist" and "O'Neill: Son and Playwright" (Little, Brown)
Eugene O'Neill's massive "The Iceman Cometh" opens Wednesday at the Doolittle Theatre, staged by Jose Quintero and starring Jason Robards. Robards and Quintero first did the play in 1956 at Off-Broadway's Circle-in-the-Square Theatre, a revival that established Robards as an importantactor and re-established O'Neill as a living presence in the American theater.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two-time Academy Award winner Jason Robards, who had a distinguished acting career on stage, screen and television, died Tuesday after a long struggle with cancer. He was 78 and died at Bridgeport Hospital in Bridgeport, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | CHIP CREWS, WASHINGTON POST
"Oh," says the cab driver, suddenly interested. "This is Mr. Robards' house." The reaction is understandable, for the big brick structure, no less than the career that purchased it, commands respect even in this hyper-affluent New England town. Jason Robards and his wife, Lois, have lived here for 26 years, and the six acres, the beautiful lawns and trees, the broad oceanfront view, tell of solidity, prosperity and peace.
BOOKS
December 24, 1995
When Charles Champlin writes in "In the Arena" (Book Review Oct. 15) that Jason Robards gave a terrible performance in "Antony and Cleopatra," he is confusing that film with "Julius Caesar," in which Robards played Brutus opposite Charlton Heston's Mark Antony in 1970. Robards could handle Shakespeare; I saw him give a dynamic performance as Hotspur at Stratford, Conn., but he was indeed terrible as Brutus, reading his lines metronomically. As for the failure of Heston's film of "Antony and Cleopatra" (1973)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Reunion" (at the Fine Arts and Town & Country), a compelling film of remarkable subtlety and insight, withholds its full meaning until its conclusion. Yet from the start we are caught up in the destiny of its hero, a rich, older Manhattan businessman (Jason Robards) whom we meet relaxing in Central Park while a child, presumably his granddaughter, plays nearby. Sitting in the sun, he is washed over by memories.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MOVIES Award-winning actor Jason Robards, who was the voice of Ulysses S. Grant in "TheCivil War," is playing another legendary American, author Mark Twain, in theDisney Channel movie, "Mark Twain and Me," currently in production in Toronto.The drama, which will premiere sometime in 1991, tells the story of a friendshipthat developed between Twain and an 11-year-old admirer named Dorothy Quick."Mark Twain and Me" is based on Quick's autobiography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Jason Robards Reads William Kennedy's 'Ironweed'." Newman (two cassettes). Robards' hoarse, down-home voice, hinting of hard days and long nights, is perfect casting for Kennedy's Francis Whelan, the Albany alcoholic who once played third base in Toronto and has come home after 22 years to confront the living and the dead from his past. Whelan and his comical-tragic pals earned Kennedy's novel a wholly deserved Pulitzer prize.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MOVIES Award-winning actor Jason Robards, who was the voice of Ulysses S. Grant in "TheCivil War," is playing another legendary American, author Mark Twain, in theDisney Channel movie, "Mark Twain and Me," currently in production in Toronto.The drama, which will premiere sometime in 1991, tells the story of a friendshipthat developed between Twain and an 11-year-old admirer named Dorothy Quick."Mark Twain and Me" is based on Quick's autobiography.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cheering From the Sidelines: Helen Hayes, 91, has never missed a performance on stage since her debut in 1906, but she did have to bow out of this year's Helen Hayes Awards ceremony Monday night in Washington. Her doctor advised her to stay home and nurse a bruised vertebra. The evening's main honoree was Jason Robards, 69, who was saluted for his achievements in the performing arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | LOUIS SHEAFFER and \o7, Sheaffer is the author of "O'Neill: Son and Artist" and "O'Neill: Son and Playwright" (Little, Brown)
Eugene O'Neill's massive "The Iceman Cometh" opens Wednesday at the Doolittle Theatre, staged by Jose Quintero and starring Jason Robards. Robards and Quintero first did the play in 1956 at Off-Broadway's Circle-in-the-Square Theatre, a revival that established Robards as an importantactor and re-established O'Neill as a living presence in the American theater.
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