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Jason Schwartzman

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NEWS
October 20, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THOUGH music remains one of Jason Schwartzman's main passions -- for a decade he was the drummer and a composer for the group Phantom Planet, whose song "California" is the theme for the Fox hit "The O.C." -- he considers himself purely an actor these days. "It was just a gut reaction," he said of his decision to leave the group. "It was natural and organic. I think it was time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - As the first YouTube Music Awards came to a close Sunday night, creative director Spike Jonze thanked the powers that be at the video-sharing website for "letting us make this mess. " He couldn't have chosen a more apt word. The inaugural 90-minute webcast, held in New York City and hosted by actor Jason Schwartzman and comedian Reggie Watts, was conceived as a more spontaneous answer to the Grammys or the Video Music Awards, one in keeping with the anarchic spirit of the Internet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Susan King
In 1961, Disney songwriting stalwarts Robert and Richard Sherman struggled with adding tunes to the "Mary Poppins" screenplay. Oh, they had plenty of ideas - some Oscar-winning ones, as it turned out. But the process of persuading the story's author that the songs would serve the material was a grueling one. That long and aggravating attempt to take "Mary Poppins" from the written page to the big screen is at the heart of "Saving Mr. Banks," a...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
It was a noble experiment. The YouTube Music Awards commissioned director Spike Jonze -- the vision behind "Being John Malkovich," the Beastie Boys' "Sabotage" video and Fatboy Slim's "Praise You" clip -- to produce its inaugural ceremony, which celebrated the video platform's musical element and was broadcast live on YouTube from Pier 36 in New York on Sunday. The 90 minutes of musical chaos honoring superstars of viral videos featured eight "live music videos" as performed by Eminem, Arcade Fire, Lady Gaga, Tyler the Creator & Earl Sweatshirt and others, and was interspersed with variety-show-on-LSD-style antics.  PHOTOS: YouTube Music Awards 2013 | Arrivals Between performances, hosts Jason Schwartzman and Reggie Watts doled out awards for video of the year, artist of the year, response of the year (basically best cover song)
NEWS
May 30, 2002
* New this week: "Slackers" is a standard-issue undergrad gross-out comedy notable only for the showy role it provides Jason Schwartzman, well remembered as "Rushmore's" geeky high school student Max Fischer. Schwartzman, a short, stocky Energizer bunny, is the irrepressible Ethan, who's smart yet hopelessly square, relentlessly obnoxious and fearlessly persistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Nothing summed up the tumult and chaos of the inaugural YouTube Music Awards like webcast director Spike Jonze's final words to host Jason Schwartzman after 88 minutes of unscripted freakiness. "I think we're done," said an exhausted-looking Jonze, having just shimmied out of the strange white protective spacesuit-looking thing he was wearing, likely to protect himself from the chalk and fairy dust that was unleashed during singer M.I.A's performance. Schwartzman too deemed that an appropriate farewell for the night, and he repeated the phrase.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Most therapists adhere pretty strictly to the same abridged hour as network dramas do, but in the new Fox comedy "Cracking Up," Jason Schwartzman plays a psychology grad student who moves in with a Beverly Hills family to devote himself full time to its youngest member. The extravagant arrangement -- it's so hard to get live-in mental help these days -- could be interpreted as a trendy dig at the uber-wealthy and the professional remoras who cater to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
It was a noble experiment. The YouTube Music Awards commissioned director Spike Jonze -- the vision behind "Being John Malkovich," the Beastie Boys' "Sabotage" video and Fatboy Slim's "Praise You" clip -- to produce its inaugural ceremony, which celebrated the video platform's musical element and was broadcast live on YouTube from Pier 36 in New York on Sunday. The 90 minutes of musical chaos honoring superstars of viral videos featured eight "live music videos" as performed by Eminem, Arcade Fire, Lady Gaga, Tyler the Creator & Earl Sweatshirt and others, and was interspersed with variety-show-on-LSD-style antics.  PHOTOS: YouTube Music Awards 2013 | Arrivals Between performances, hosts Jason Schwartzman and Reggie Watts doled out awards for video of the year, artist of the year, response of the year (basically best cover song)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - As the first YouTube Music Awards came to a close Sunday night, creative director Spike Jonze thanked the powers that be at the video-sharing website for "letting us make this mess. " He couldn't have chosen a more apt word. The inaugural 90-minute webcast, held in New York City and hosted by actor Jason Schwartzman and comedian Reggie Watts, was conceived as a more spontaneous answer to the Grammys or the Video Music Awards, one in keeping with the anarchic spirit of the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Jason SCHWARTZMAN is overdressed. Out on the patio of Le Pain Quotidien in the angular shadow of the Pacific Design Center, the 24-year-old actor sits ramrod straight, powering down glass after glass of iced coffee amid the lunchtime clatter and mannered cool of young Hollywood. Despite early September heat, Schwartzman looks impeccable, buttoned down in a navy blue suit with peaked lapels and a crisp cotton shirt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Nothing summed up the tumult and chaos of the inaugural YouTube Music Awards like webcast director Spike Jonze's final words to host Jason Schwartzman after 88 minutes of unscripted freakiness. "I think we're done," said an exhausted-looking Jonze, having just shimmied out of the strange white protective spacesuit-looking thing he was wearing, likely to protect himself from the chalk and fairy dust that was unleashed during singer M.I.A's performance. Schwartzman too deemed that an appropriate farewell for the night, and he repeated the phrase.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Susan King
In 1961, Disney songwriting stalwarts Robert and Richard Sherman struggled with adding tunes to the "Mary Poppins" screenplay. Oh, they had plenty of ideas - some Oscar-winning ones, as it turned out. But the process of persuading the story's author that the songs would serve the material was a grueling one. That long and aggravating attempt to take "Mary Poppins" from the written page to the big screen is at the heart of "Saving Mr. Banks," a...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Robert Lloyd, TELEVISION CRITIC
Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction, has turned his long short story "Bored to Death" into an HBO situation comedy, also titled, though less aptly, "Bored to Death." Each version revolves around a character named Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction who is having a hard time finishing his second novel and is drinking too much white wine -- which is his idea of drinking less alcohol -- and smoking too much pot. As the series opens, his girlfriend is moving out and -- sad, stymied and under the influence of a Raymond Chandler novel -- he goes onto Craigslist to advertise his services as a private detective: "I'm not licensed but maybe I'm someone who can help you."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Jason Schwartzman limped around his friend's sun-dappled Nichols Canyon retreat looking highly apologetic. Frowning at his heels was his chubby French bulldog, Arrow. Schwartzman had broken his toe the day before, and as he made his way to a secluded outdoor table, he tried explaining. "It was like that scene in 'Karate Kid,' " he said, presumably casting himself in the Ralph Macchio role. Everyone was kicking soccer balls around like a bunch of Pelés, he said.
NEWS
October 20, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THOUGH music remains one of Jason Schwartzman's main passions -- for a decade he was the drummer and a composer for the group Phantom Planet, whose song "California" is the theme for the Fox hit "The O.C." -- he considers himself purely an actor these days. "It was just a gut reaction," he said of his decision to leave the group. "It was natural and organic. I think it was time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Jason SCHWARTZMAN is overdressed. Out on the patio of Le Pain Quotidien in the angular shadow of the Pacific Design Center, the 24-year-old actor sits ramrod straight, powering down glass after glass of iced coffee amid the lunchtime clatter and mannered cool of young Hollywood. Despite early September heat, Schwartzman looks impeccable, buttoned down in a navy blue suit with peaked lapels and a crisp cotton shirt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Jason Schwartzman limped around his friend's sun-dappled Nichols Canyon retreat looking highly apologetic. Frowning at his heels was his chubby French bulldog, Arrow. Schwartzman had broken his toe the day before, and as he made his way to a secluded outdoor table, he tried explaining. "It was like that scene in 'Karate Kid,' " he said, presumably casting himself in the Ralph Macchio role. Everyone was kicking soccer balls around like a bunch of Pelés, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Robert Lloyd, TELEVISION CRITIC
Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction, has turned his long short story "Bored to Death" into an HBO situation comedy, also titled, though less aptly, "Bored to Death." Each version revolves around a character named Jonathan Ames, a Brooklyn-based writer of fiction and nonfiction who is having a hard time finishing his second novel and is drinking too much white wine -- which is his idea of drinking less alcohol -- and smoking too much pot. As the series opens, his girlfriend is moving out and -- sad, stymied and under the influence of a Raymond Chandler novel -- he goes onto Craigslist to advertise his services as a private detective: "I'm not licensed but maybe I'm someone who can help you."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Most therapists adhere pretty strictly to the same abridged hour as network dramas do, but in the new Fox comedy "Cracking Up," Jason Schwartzman plays a psychology grad student who moves in with a Beverly Hills family to devote himself full time to its youngest member. The extravagant arrangement -- it's so hard to get live-in mental help these days -- could be interpreted as a trendy dig at the uber-wealthy and the professional remoras who cater to them.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
* New this week: "Slackers" is a standard-issue undergrad gross-out comedy notable only for the showy role it provides Jason Schwartzman, well remembered as "Rushmore's" geeky high school student Max Fischer. Schwartzman, a short, stocky Energizer bunny, is the irrepressible Ethan, who's smart yet hopelessly square, relentlessly obnoxious and fearlessly persistent.
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