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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Richard Riordan's staff poked fun this week at the ballot counting mess in Florida by sending out an invitation to a holiday party printed like one of those butterfly ballots that has Democrats crying foul in Tallahassee. The mock ballot offers a chance to vote on whether to attend the party, but the choices don't line up with any of the hole punches that run down the center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000
Actor Rick Jason, who played the hard-boiled leader Lt. Gil Hanley on the 1960s television drama "Combat!," was found dead Monday in his house. He was 74. Jason died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head and was found by his wife about 5 a.m., said Ventura County Deputy Coroner Craig Stevens. He left no note, and authorities only said that he was despondent over personal matters. Funeral arrangements were pending.
MAGAZINE
March 12, 2006
As an aspiring screenwriter, I have voraciously read The Rules of Hollywood column every week--not because I feel I have to but because it is really compelling. I read Jason Alexander's piece to hear a giant character speak of such normal, everyday insecurities ("Once You're in the Club, Mr. Dogg Is Simply Snoop," Feb. 19). He brought himself down to everyone's level. I loved that he showed us how fragile he feels in his world. That was a brave exposure. Andrea Levy Woodland Hills
BOOKS
December 24, 1995
When Charles Champlin writes in "In the Arena" (Book Review Oct. 15) that Jason Robards gave a terrible performance in "Antony and Cleopatra," he is confusing that film with "Julius Caesar," in which Robards played Brutus opposite Charlton Heston's Mark Antony in 1970. Robards could handle Shakespeare; I saw him give a dynamic performance as Hotspur at Stratford, Conn., but he was indeed terrible as Brutus, reading his lines metronomically. As for the failure of Heston's film of "Antony and Cleopatra" (1973)
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