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Jasper Fforde

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2010
Shades of Grey A Novel Jasper Fforde Viking: 400 pp., $25.95
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Books for tweens may get overshadowed by the enormous popularity of young-adult titles, but the category is still robust, as more bestselling authors of adult and teen books apply their talents to a younger audience. Infinity Ring Book One: A Mutiny in Time By James DashnerScholastic, 192 pp.: $12.99, for ages 8 and up Three kids travel back through history to fix it and save the future in this kickoff to a new multimedia series that can be experienced as both a book and video game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Books for tweens may get overshadowed by the enormous popularity of young-adult titles, but the category is still robust, as more bestselling authors of adult and teen books apply their talents to a younger audience. Infinity Ring Book One: A Mutiny in Time By James DashnerScholastic, 192 pp.: $12.99, for ages 8 and up Three kids travel back through history to fix it and save the future in this kickoff to a new multimedia series that can be experienced as both a book and video game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011 | Paula L. Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's conceivable that, after a decade-long run as one of the more popular speculative fiction writers, even Jasper Fforde could be in need of a challenge. Over that period, he's written five wildly inventive "Thursday Next" novels that follow the literary adventures of Next, a female detective in an alternative universe where England is still fighting the Crimean War, the country is controlled by the unscrupulous multinational Goliath Corporation and Next herself is the dubious owner of a cloned dodo named Miss Pickwick.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011 | Paula L. Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's conceivable that, after a decade-long run as one of the more popular speculative fiction writers, even Jasper Fforde could be in need of a challenge. Over that period, he's written five wildly inventive "Thursday Next" novels that follow the literary adventures of Next, a female detective in an alternative universe where England is still fighting the Crimean War, the country is controlled by the unscrupulous multinational Goliath Corporation and Next herself is the dubious owner of a cloned dodo named Miss Pickwick.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Words & Ideas Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Dan Fante: The author of "86'd" will read and sign his novel. Diesel Bookstore, 3890 Cross Creek Road, Malibu. 3 p.m. Free. (310) 456-9961. Ralph Hulett: The author of "Led Zeppelin: Good Times, Bad Times" will present and sign his new photography book charting the band's rise to fame and infamy. Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 4 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. Karline McLain: The author of "India's Immortal Comic Books: Gods, Kings and Other Heroes" will discuss her book in light of the museum's current exhibition "Heroes and Villains: The Battle for Good in India's Comics."
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
The third installment in the Thursday Next series of literary adventure-thriller-fantasy novels by Jasper Fforde, "The Well of Lost Plots," is pure candy for the book lover's soul. The series, whose narrator is a female detective named Thursday Next, is set in a bizarre and brilliantly imagined world of literature, in which characters from well-known novels appear alongside made-up people and creatures and the laws of nature as we know them cease to exist.
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is a regular contributor to Book Review and author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series, including the forthcoming "Strange Bedfellows."
BRITISH writer Jasper Fforde has been building a worldwide cadre of readers since 2002's "The Eyre Affair," which introduced Special Operative Thursday Next. Her adventures in an alternate universe were a cleverly plotted, quirky gumbo of literature, mystery and fantasy. But after four books, Fforde's plots had become increasingly twisted, which probably pleased long-term fans but may have befuddled those who came to the series, shall we say, midstream of consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2006 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
THE thing about characters from nursery rhymes is that they always do the same thing. It's written into their DNA. According to Mary Mary ("quite contrary"), a detective sergeant in the Nursery Crime Division of the Reading, England, police force, "We call them PDRs. Persons of Dubious Reality. Refugees from the collective consciousness. Uninvited visitors who have fallen through the grating that divides the real from the written.
BOOKS
March 17, 2002 | JAMIE JAMES, Jamie James is the author of the novel "Andrew and Joey."
Welcome to Wonderland. The year is 1985. The Crimean War is in its 131st year; cloned dodos are popular pets; air travel by dirigible is the favored way of skipping about the realm. And life as we know it is rent not by political or religious strife but by literary factionalism. The nightly news reports fierce street fights between surrealists and classicists. The Stratfordian orthodoxy is under siege by militant Baconians and rowdy advocates of Christopher Marlowe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Words & Ideas Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Dan Fante: The author of "86'd" will read and sign his novel. Diesel Bookstore, 3890 Cross Creek Road, Malibu. 3 p.m. Free. (310) 456-9961. Ralph Hulett: The author of "Led Zeppelin: Good Times, Bad Times" will present and sign his new photography book charting the band's rise to fame and infamy. Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 4 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. Karline McLain: The author of "India's Immortal Comic Books: Gods, Kings and Other Heroes" will discuss her book in light of the museum's current exhibition "Heroes and Villains: The Battle for Good in India's Comics."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2010
Shades of Grey A Novel Jasper Fforde Viking: 400 pp., $25.95
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2006 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
THE thing about characters from nursery rhymes is that they always do the same thing. It's written into their DNA. According to Mary Mary ("quite contrary"), a detective sergeant in the Nursery Crime Division of the Reading, England, police force, "We call them PDRs. Persons of Dubious Reality. Refugees from the collective consciousness. Uninvited visitors who have fallen through the grating that divides the real from the written.
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is a regular contributor to Book Review and author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series, including the forthcoming "Strange Bedfellows."
BRITISH writer Jasper Fforde has been building a worldwide cadre of readers since 2002's "The Eyre Affair," which introduced Special Operative Thursday Next. Her adventures in an alternate universe were a cleverly plotted, quirky gumbo of literature, mystery and fantasy. But after four books, Fforde's plots had become increasingly twisted, which probably pleased long-term fans but may have befuddled those who came to the series, shall we say, midstream of consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Something Rotten A Novel Jasper Fforde Viking: 392 pp., $24.95 * A Carnivore's Inquiry A Novel Sabina Murray Grove Press: 296 pp., $23 * Infused with humor and extraordinary inventiveness, "Something Rotten," the fourth in Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next detective series, is pure fun. Part mystery, part fantasy, the series has its own bizarre logic.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
The third installment in the Thursday Next series of literary adventure-thriller-fantasy novels by Jasper Fforde, "The Well of Lost Plots," is pure candy for the book lover's soul. The series, whose narrator is a female detective named Thursday Next, is set in a bizarre and brilliantly imagined world of literature, in which characters from well-known novels appear alongside made-up people and creatures and the laws of nature as we know them cease to exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Something Rotten A Novel Jasper Fforde Viking: 392 pp., $24.95 * A Carnivore's Inquiry A Novel Sabina Murray Grove Press: 296 pp., $23 * Infused with humor and extraordinary inventiveness, "Something Rotten," the fourth in Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next detective series, is pure fun. Part mystery, part fantasy, the series has its own bizarre logic.
BOOKS
March 17, 2002 | JAMIE JAMES, Jamie James is the author of the novel "Andrew and Joey."
Welcome to Wonderland. The year is 1985. The Crimean War is in its 131st year; cloned dodos are popular pets; air travel by dirigible is the favored way of skipping about the realm. And life as we know it is rent not by political or religious strife but by literary factionalism. The nightly news reports fierce street fights between surrealists and classicists. The Stratfordian orthodoxy is under siege by militant Baconians and rowdy advocates of Christopher Marlowe.
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