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Jasper Johns

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November 15, 2012
Explore the work of the legendary post-Abstract Expressionist and minimalist Jasper Johns in an exhibition at Leslie Sacks Contemporary. A variety of Johns' cutting-edge work will be on display, including several of his iconic flag and number paintings. Leslie Sacks Contemporary, Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Ave., B6, Santa Monica. Sat. to Jan. 5. Free. Gallery hours vary. (310) 264-0640; http://www.lscontemporary.com.
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January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Jasper Johns' former assistant has been charged with stealing nearly two dozen pieces from the artist and taking them to a New York gallery that sold them for $6.5 million. James Meyer, 51, who was Johns' assistant for 25 years, allegedly stole the works from the renowned contemporary artist's Connecticut studio and took them to a Manhattan gallery. The gallery, which has not been named, sold the pieces for $6.5 million between 2006 and 2012 and Meyer pocketed $3.4 million, according to reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Together, Joan Mitchell and Jasper Johns would seem to be an unlikely pair of inspirations for a new body of paintings, but there they are hovering in the background of 10 lovely recent works by Mark Dutcher. Two kinds of nominal handwriting -- gestural abstraction and a recognizable vocabulary of painted signs -- slip and slide across the surfaces of his canvases, as if perpetually merging and fading away. Most of Dutcher's paintings at Coagula Curatorial are of a size (4 ½ feet tall)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Holly Myers
It is with a duly momentous air that Matthew Marks Gallery declares its current Jasper Johns exhibition to be “the first time in Johns's more than 50-year career that he has chosen to debut a major body of work in Los An geles.” One cannot help but feel that some cosmic tide must surely have turned, for so iconic a member of the New York school to turn his attentions thus westward, with a gallery that is itself a recent high-profile transplant...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | ZAN DUBIN
An exhibit that examines the etchings of Jasper Johns, arguably the greatest printmaker of our time and a venerated painter, opens Tuesday at UCLA's Frederick S. Wight Art Gallery. "Foirades/Fizzles: Echo and Allusion in the Art of Jasper Johns" focuses on prints he made for "Foirades/Fizzles," an illustrated book with text by novelist and playwright Samuel Beckett.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Greenville County Museum of Art plans to spend $5.8 million on works by pop/Abstract Expressionist artist Jasper Johns. It is one of the largest art acquisitions by any museum in the Southern region. The museum will purchase an oil painting, two watercolors, a monotype print, a drawing and 30 prints directly from Johns. All the works are from the artist's personal collection, and the price is lower than the art could bring on the open market, museum director Tom Styron said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jasper Johns first started painting in the 1950s, his subjects--targets, flags, letters and numbers--were so familiar that they were, in a way, hard to see. By recasting obvious cultural symbols in an unexpected guise--painted on canvas, with loaded, gestural brush strokes--Johns posed a litany of questions about sight, perception and knowledge. The friction of those three forces charged his work with its own peculiar energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Jasper Johns had his first show at the Leo Castelli Gallery, a Manhattan showcase most artists would kill for, and he immediately sold three paintings to the Museum of Modern Art. It was an auspicious beginning for an artist often said to be the best in the country and who commands higher auction prices than any other living artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
Somewhere in memory or imagination I saw a photograph of Marilyn Monroe visiting with Albert Einstein. It didn't make me think that Monroe was a nuclear physicist or that Einstein was a dirty old man. It made me realize that both of them were celebrities. It was sad and wry to think of Einstein as a celebrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Jasper Johns' former assistant has been charged with stealing nearly two dozen pieces from the artist and taking them to a New York gallery that sold them for $6.5 million. James Meyer, 51, who was Johns' assistant for 25 years, allegedly stole the works from the renowned contemporary artist's Connecticut studio and took them to a Manhattan gallery. The gallery, which has not been named, sold the pieces for $6.5 million between 2006 and 2012 and Meyer pocketed $3.4 million, according to reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
If you like paint, you'll like "Richard Jackson: Ain't Painting a Pain," the artist's 40-year retrospective exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach. It's awash in the stuff. Thick, brightly colored paint oozes like mortar from between thousands of canvases stacked like bricks into a kind of room-size temple, and it's smeared in rainbows that unfurl across white walls. It's shot from a pellet gun at a big drawing and out of the rear ends of carousel animals toward spinning canvases and sculptures on surrounding walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Holly Myers
It is with a duly momentous air that Matthew Marks Gallery declares its current Jasper Johns exhibition to be “the first time in Johns's more than 50-year career that he has chosen to debut a major body of work in Los An geles.” One cannot help but feel that some cosmic tide must surely have turned, for so iconic a member of the New York school to turn his attentions thus westward, with a gallery that is itself a recent high-profile transplant...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012
Explore the work of the legendary post-Abstract Expressionist and minimalist Jasper Johns in an exhibition at Leslie Sacks Contemporary. A variety of Johns' cutting-edge work will be on display, including several of his iconic flag and number paintings. Leslie Sacks Contemporary, Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Ave., B6, Santa Monica. Sat. to Jan. 5. Free. Gallery hours vary. (310) 264-0640; http://www.lscontemporary.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cy Twombly, an internationally renowned American artist whose lyrically evocative signature works blur the boundaries of painting, drawing and handwritten poetry, has died. He was 83. Twombly died Tuesday in Rome, where he had spent much of his time since the late 1950s. The cause of death was not immediately known, but he had suffered from cancer, the Associated Press reported. An independent figure who likened his art to an encapsulation of the creative experience, Twombly was sometimes dismissed as a minor talent or disparaged as a doodler whose loosely fashioned images, loopy texts and skeins of colored line looked too easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Stanley Meisler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1989, the private Corcoran Gallery of Art, battered by threats from Congress and worried about future federal grants, canceled an exhibition by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe that included male nudity and homosexual scenes. The controversial banning made the Washington art establishment seem philistine, intolerant and spineless. Times and attitudes change. Now, a Washington museum is pioneering a show that celebrates gay and lesbian art and delineates its place in the history of American painting and photography.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Heralding the holiday season and looking forward to a new year when income tax laws will once again encourage donations of artworks to museums, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art has announced a major addition to its collection. "Map," a seminal painting by Jasper Johns, is a gift of Marcia Weisman, a founding director of the museum and a long-time art collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
When Andy Warhol began his "paint by numbers" series of drawings and paintings in 1962, he made sly fun of the widespread American aversion to the wilder shores of the avant-garde. For kids in the 1950s, paint-by-numbers kits had been hugely popular toys. Warhol's grown-up versions reflected back the popular assumption that, when it came to Modern art, a 5-year-old child could indeed do that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010
Arts patron gets 9 years Former international arts patron Alberto Vilar was sentenced Friday to nine years in prison for stealing from investors at his Amerindo Investment Advisors Inc. U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan announced the sentence at a hearing in Manhattan federal court, where Vilar, 69, was convicted in 2008 of all 12 criminal counts against him, including fraud and conspiracy. Vilar also was ordered to pay $21.9 million in restitution. Prosecutors said Vilar and his former Amerindo partner, Gary Tanaka, stole from clients to keep the firm afloat and to fund Vilar's philanthropic pledges and lifestyle after Internet and technology stocks plunged beginning in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
MOCA: An article last Sunday about the Museum of Contemporary Art incorrectly referred to "a Mark Rothko bull's eye" painting in the museum's collection. The painting is by Elaine Sturtevant, based on a target image by Jasper Johns.
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