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November 11, 1988
About 20,000 protesters rallied in the streets of Dhaka, capital of Bangladesh, and demanded that President Hussain Mohammed Ershad resign to pave the way for parliamentary elections. The demonstrators, shouting anti-government slogans, gathered in five separate rallies to mark the anniversary of a violent campaign launched Nov. 10, 1987 to topple the president.
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NEWS
November 11, 1988
About 20,000 protesters rallied in the streets of Dhaka, capital of Bangladesh, and demanded that President Hussain Mohammed Ershad resign to pave the way for parliamentary elections. The demonstrators, shouting anti-government slogans, gathered in five separate rallies to mark the anniversary of a violent campaign launched Nov. 10, 1987 to topple the president.
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NEWS
May 8, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
After an election marred by widespread fraud, intimidation and violence, both major parties claimed victory Wednesday night in the third parliamentary vote in the troubled 15-year history of Bangladesh. "We have won the mandate of the people," said the leader of the opposition Awami League, Sheik Hasina Wazed. Nonetheless, the government-backed Jatiya Party is expected to be given a majority of the 330 seats in the Parliament when the final results are announced today.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | Associated Press
President Hussain Mohammed Ershad offered to hold early elections in a speech to the nation Saturday, 24 hours after he declared a state of emergency to quell growing unrest. The government, meanwhile, imposed strict press censorship, banning all reports on the political opposition and on anything deemed critical of the government. Curfews stilled the streets of Dhaka and four other cities. Ershad's offer came in a 25-minute address broadcast over radio and television.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Bangladesh's opposition leader, Sheik Hasina Wazed, Thursday demanded new elections in many areas of the country in the wake of national parliamentary balloting that was plagued by fraud and violence. Hasina, president of the Awami League, a political party that finished second in the disputed election to a new government-backed party, asked for new voting in "at least 50" of the 300 parliamentary constituencies.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | Associated Press
President Hussain Mohammed Ershad offered to hold early elections in a speech to the nation Saturday, 24 hours after he declared a state of emergency to quell growing unrest. The government, meanwhile, imposed strict press censorship, banning all reports on the political opposition and on anything deemed critical of the government. Curfews stilled the streets of Dhaka and four other cities. Ershad's offer came in a 25-minute address broadcast over radio and television.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia has rejected an offer by her rival and successor to join the new Cabinet. Prime Minister Hasina Wajed, whose party is four seats short of a majority in the new Parliament, included in her Cabinet ministers from the Jatiya Party, which finished third, and the National Socialist Party, a small leftist group. Past feuding between Zia and Wajed has threatened the country's nascent democracy and badly weakened its economy.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deposed President Hussain Mohammed Ershad's Jatiya Party will contest the Feb. 27 parliamentary elections, party officials said in Dhaka. Ershad, who has been under house arrest for the last three weeks, resigned Dec. 6, bowing to public pressure against what opposition parties said was his autocratic and corrupt government. It was not immediately known if Ershad himself would be allowed to contest next month's elections.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Associated Press
The government mobilized the army Saturday to help with rescue and relief operations in areas ravaged by flooding that has killed 94 people, a presidential aide said. President Hussain Mohammed Ershad also ordered his ministers and Parliament members of his Jatiya Party to rush to the affected areas to help supervise the relief operations, his presidential press secretary said.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Bangladesh's opposition leader, Sheik Hasina Wazed, Thursday demanded new elections in many areas of the country in the wake of national parliamentary balloting that was plagued by fraud and violence. Hasina, president of the Awami League, a political party that finished second in the disputed election to a new government-backed party, asked for new voting in "at least 50" of the 300 parliamentary constituencies.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
After an election marred by widespread fraud, intimidation and violence, both major parties claimed victory Wednesday night in the third parliamentary vote in the troubled 15-year history of Bangladesh. "We have won the mandate of the people," said the leader of the opposition Awami League, Sheik Hasina Wazed. Nonetheless, the government-backed Jatiya Party is expected to be given a majority of the 330 seats in the Parliament when the final results are announced today.
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