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NEWS
October 11, 2010
Researchers may have discovered a possible link between jaundice in newborns and an increased risk of psychological development difficulties, including autism. Danish scientists looked at data on the 733,826 live births in Denmark between 1994 and 2004. In that group, 35,766 were diagnosed with neonatal jaundice, a fairly common illness in babies that usually goes away within a week of birth. During the study period, 1,721 children were diagnosed with a psychological development disorder, and 4,257 children died.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2012 | By Nicholas Basbanes
Fobbit A Novel David Abrams Black Cat: 372 pp., $15 paper In "Going After Cacciato," Tim O'Brien's brilliantly inventive 1978 novel, the title character seeks to escape the madness of 20th-century warfare by simply walking away from the rice paddies of Vietnam and heading for Paris, some 6,800 miles away. Whether real or imagined, the point of the surreal exercise is to get out of the line of fire - the farther away, the better. The soldiers deployed to Iraq in "Fobbit," a first novel by David Abrams, a former Army public affairs specialist who served there in 2005, are far less adventurous in their approach to staying alive, especially if they work in the type of administrative, support, logistics or supply job that does not require them to be in close contact with an enemy all too eager to obliterate them.
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HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
As hospital maternity stays have grown shorter in recent years, the majority of babies have suffered no ill consequences from being released with their mothers 24 to 48 hours after delivery. However, about 5% of infants develop jaundice -- a condition that usually doesn't show up until several days after birth -- which requires hospital readmission. Now some pediatricians are urging changes in the diagnosis and treatment of jaundice in infants.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Researchers may have discovered a possible link between jaundice in newborns and an increased risk of psychological development difficulties, including autism. Danish scientists looked at data on the 733,826 live births in Denmark between 1994 and 2004. In that group, 35,766 were diagnosed with neonatal jaundice, a fairly common illness in babies that usually goes away within a week of birth. During the study period, 1,721 children were diagnosed with a psychological development disorder, and 4,257 children died.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1985 | DJ
Aequitron Medical said it received Food & Drug Administration clearance to market its Model 7100 phototherapy light, which is designed to speed recovery from newborn jaundice. The company said an estimated 10% of newborn infants have abnormaly high bilirubin levels and require light therapy, necessitating exended hospital stays until the danger of central nervous system toxicity has passed. The company said the product is portable.
NEWS
November 28, 1985 | From Reuters
A Polish doctor was charged with unintentional manslaughter and her superior with negligence after the deaths of six babies given injections for jaundice, the official PAP news agency reported Wednesday. Last August, eleven newly born infants in Wloclawek were injected with a solution of glucose and albumin that had been kept in the open for more than 12 hours instead of the prescribed four. Six infants later died.
OPINION
July 21, 1996 | Bruce McCall, Bruce McCall is a regular contributor to the New Yorker
Blaming "a pro-Roosevelt media more vindictive than Kaiser Bill" for putting his remarks in context, GOP presidential candidate Bob Dole refused again today to modify his recent controversial statements on key issues.
NEWS
August 16, 1985 | From Reuters
A sixth baby given injections for the treatment of jaundice died in Wloclawek Hospital in central Poland, the official news agency PAP reported Thursday. It said the public prosecutor's office, which is investigating the deaths, had found "glaring irregularities" in the use of medicine in the children's ward. The six who died were among 11 newly born infants injected with a solution of glucose and albumin. PAP said two of them probably suffered from birth defects.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
OPINION
September 12, 1999 | PATTI DAVIS, Patti Davis, a screenwriter, is the author of "Bondage" and "Angels Don't Die"
It's become clear to me that I have no choice but to declare my candidacy for president of the United States. I think this country needs and deserves someone who will proudly stand up to her sinful past, not apologize for it, hide from it or weasel out of it. For anyone whose memory of the '80s is fuzzy, during my father's presidency, it was firmly established that I am, in fact, a sinner. Drugs, debauchery, overly confessional books--the whole bit. I have nothing to hide.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | SUSAN KING
Not every movie produced by the Hollywood studios during the Golden Age was tied up in neat little bows; it wasn't all boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl. "Films were more edgy and involved characters that were less than perfect," says UCLA film professor Jonathan Kuntz. "Certainly in the 1930s with the Great Depression, there was a lot of disillusionment with the establishment and society. World War II shook everything up and all kinds of crazy things happen."
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
As hospital maternity stays have grown shorter in recent years, the majority of babies have suffered no ill consequences from being released with their mothers 24 to 48 hours after delivery. However, about 5% of infants develop jaundice -- a condition that usually doesn't show up until several days after birth -- which requires hospital readmission. Now some pediatricians are urging changes in the diagnosis and treatment of jaundice in infants.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | JIM MANN
If you want to see a questionable double standard at work, look at the widely disparate American attitudes toward Russia's new president, Vladimir V. Putin, and Chinese President Jiang Zemin. In the United States these days, and particularly among foreign policy elites, Putin is darkly portrayed as the vintage apparatchik, the mysterious ex-KGB man who threatens Russian liberties. Meanwhile, Jiang is often depicted as a closet reformer who may some day slowly move China in the right direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nonny de la Pen~a's "The Jaundiced Eye," a documentary chronicling a terrible miscarriage of justice strung out over a decade, is a real-life family horror story. A father and son in a quaint, Norman Rockwell-like Michigan town are caught between a collision of two emotionally charged forces in American society: a lingering homophobia and a growing concern about child abuse.
OPINION
September 12, 1999 | PATTI DAVIS, Patti Davis, a screenwriter, is the author of "Bondage" and "Angels Don't Die"
It's become clear to me that I have no choice but to declare my candidacy for president of the United States. I think this country needs and deserves someone who will proudly stand up to her sinful past, not apologize for it, hide from it or weasel out of it. For anyone whose memory of the '80s is fuzzy, during my father's presidency, it was firmly established that I am, in fact, a sinner. Drugs, debauchery, overly confessional books--the whole bit. I have nothing to hide.
OPINION
October 1, 1995 | Bruce McCall, Bruce McCall is a regular contributor to the New Yorker
"Perfect fit!" "Unbelievable synergy!" "Both sides win!" Today's bombshell announcement that India and Brazil will merge to form the world's fourth-largest such entity is being greeted with hosannas by leading analysts on six continents. "Just look how they line up," exults one New York geopolitical analyst. "Both are hot, both have big rivers running through them. India loves cows and Brazil's cattle industry currently has a 45% overcapacity.
HEALTH
November 10, 1997 | DELTHIA RICKS, NEWSDAY
One of the more startling outcomes of birth is jaundice in the newborn, which often is of no consequence. Sometimes, however, jaundice can be serious, even fatal, and, as scientists now are finding, can have deep roots in the genes. Reporting in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers in Israel have homed in on the genes that lead to a condition called kernicterus.
OPINION
July 13, 1997 | Bruce McCall, Bruce McCall is a regular contributor to the New Yorker. His memoir, "Thin Ice: Coming of Age in Canada" (Random House), is out this month
The Associated Press recently reported that a Friends of Libraries, U.S.A., list of National Literary Landmarks includes "the Algonquin Hotel in New York, the Edgar Allen Poe house in Philadelphia and the Robert Frost cottage in Key West, Fla." * Never forget that Christmas engagement party he threw for Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hargitay. "Oh-oh," everybody said around 3 a.m., "the Frost Man's going into his Ed Sullivan bit!" He and Peter Lawford were "batching it" in Key West that winter.
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