Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJava
IN THE NEWS

Java

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
January 6, 2012
More proof that Indonesia is one of the most volcanically active places on the great Pacific Ring of Fire came in October 2010, when 9,560-foot Mt. Merapi, visible from the temple of Borobudur, erupted, killing 343 people and displacing an estimated 90,000. The road leading to the mountain was closed, but visitors can still see evidence of continuing volcanism on the island of Java by making a trip the Dieng Plateau. The area, about 75 miles northwest of the city of Yogyakarta, is the wide caldera of an extinct volcano, now covered by potato fields, villages - each with its own candy-colored mosque - and the island's oldest Hindu temples.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Los Feliz was buzzing Sunday afternoon as crowds of people lined up for hours to grab a cup of coffee from, uh, Dumb Starbucks. The mock store, which quietly opened Friday, is nearly identical to a typical Starbucks location, with tumblers and CDs, including "Dumb Jazz Standards," on display - but not for sale. Drinks are served in cups that mock the Seattle coffee giant's logo, while pastries are pulled from display cases straight in their Vons' packaging. The menu features such offerings as Dumb Iced Coffee, Dumb Frappuccinos and Wuppy Duppy Latte.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Google Inc. Chief Executive Larry Page returned to the witness stand for nearly an hour in a San Francisco federal courtroom Wednesday to defend his company against allegations that its Android mobile software, which now powers more than 300 million smartphones and tablet computers, infringes on Oracle Corp.'s patents and copyrights. Page, in a rare appearance in suit and tie, was questioned by David Boies, famous for going after Bill Gates during the federal government's antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft Corp.
TRAVEL
November 10, 2013 | By Amy Strong
San Francisco's artisan coffee shops have become a destination for the caffeinated crowd. Young guys work like highly trained chemists behind gleaming counters, intent on concocting the perfect brew. And the baristas don't just rely on $10,000 espresso machines to do the work. These coffee shops put on a show with glowing heat lamps, bubbling beakers and beautifully artistic cappuccinos. They also serve a memorable breakfast and lunch using local, organic ingredients from places such as Acme Bread, INNA Jam and K&J Orchards.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001 | From Reuters
Microsoft Corp. and rival Sun Microsystems Inc. on Tuesday settled a bitter, 3-year-old lawsuit, with Microsoft agreeing to pay its rival $20 million for limited use of its Java technology. Sun's lawsuit, filed in October 1997, alleged that the world's largest software company violated terms of its licensing agreement for Java by improperly modifying the technology so it would work only with its Windows computer operating system.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Bruce Taylor opened a new tin of coffee at work this week and found a set of false teeth inside. "The teeth probably fell in when the coffee was packed. I doubt whether anyone is looking for them--they don't look too healthy," he said. Undeterred by his discovery, Taylor made two cups of coffee, but "my colleagues were disgusted with me. None of them would have a cup."
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Sun Microsystems Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. today will announce a Java operating system designed for network computers in a bid to define a standard that could help boost the fledgling NC market. The companies will collaborate on what they're calling Java OS for Business and will make it available to manufacturers at midyear, with products based on the software available next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
In the worlds of myth and literature, plenty of figures have had their "lost" years. There are, to name a few, Sherlock Holmes (after the plunge from Reichenbach Falls), the wizard Merlin (was he imprisoned in a cave or was he killed?), Shakespeare (what was his education and upbringing?) and Jesus (did he or didn't he go to India as a child?). What did they do during those years? How did they live? Such questions have lured many writers into producing books that try to fill in these tantalizing gaps with definitive evidence.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2010 | By Carol Rosenberg and Patricia Mazzei
Cornelius Reagan, shot down over Indonesia during World War II, survived on his wits, tropical fruit and the raw flesh of animals. Then Japanese forces found him and imprisoned him in internment camps for more than three years. This week, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Miami honored his sacrifice by awarding the U.S. Army Air Corps second lieutenant, now 95, the Prisoner of War Medal ? 65 years after he was released by the Japanese weighing just 92 pounds. "I thought to myself, if I can just survive, I'll be able to get home," a beaming Reagan said at the ceremony, as he stood proudly with his new medal pinned to the lapel of his gray suit.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is asking a judge to declare a mistrial after a federal jury in San Francisco rendered a split decision: the panel  ruled against the company in Oracle's copyright case over the search giant's popular Android mobile software but reaching an impasse on a key issue. The jury found for Oracle in the largest claim, but could not decide if Google's use of the copyrights was legally protected as “fair use.” Google prevailed on two other claims. Oracle has accused Google of stealing some of its Java technology to build Android.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
"Java Heat" is a good-looking thriller made of rickshaws and machine guns, with Mickey Rourke as a French villain and "Twilight" actor Kellan Lutz a hyper-buff art student who isn't everything he seems. But the film's anthropological interest in Indonesia is the smartest thing in an otherwise familiar scramble of kidnapped babes, expensive jewelry and millions of bullets. Indonesia, as the opening credits inform, is home to the largest Muslim population in the world. Writer-director-model Conor Allyn and his co-writer, dad Rob, live part time in Java and their intimacy with the country shows.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013 | Wire reports
Overanalyze stormed down the home stretch to pull away and win the $1-million Arkansas Derby on Saturday at Hot Springs, Ark. The colt, trained by Todd Pletcher , trailed with a second group for much of the race before charging ahead after the final turn in the 1 1/8-mile race. Overanalyze overcame the lead pack and held off Frac Daddy and Carve to earn Pletcher his third win in the Kentucky Derby prep race, his first since winning back-to-back Arkansas Derby races in 2000 and 2001.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is continuing to advise users to disable Java on their Web browsers, despite Oracle issuing an update that the company said would fix the software's vulnerability to hackers. Oracle, which owns Java, issued an update Sunday that supposedly fixed a security flaw found in the software. The update came after Homeland Security warned users last week of a vulnerability within the software that could be exploited by hackers to install malware on users' computers.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Oracle has issued an update for its Java software to fix a security flaw so severe that it led the U.S. government to issue a note last week urging computer users to disable Java. The vulnerability makes it possible for hackers to install malware that allows them to commit identify-theft crimes or add infected computers to networks that can be used for cyber attacks. Because of the severity of the vulnerability, Oracle said it "strongly recommends" that users update their software as soon as possible.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
In a rare warning, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security is urging computer users to disable the Java software, citing what it says is a vulnerability in the Oracle's programming platform. Apple said it is heeding the advice and has remotely disabled Java for most Mac users. "Java 7 Update 10 and earlier contain an unspecified vulnerability that can allow a remote, unauthenticated attacker to execute arbitrary code on a vulnerable system," the Homeland Security's Computer Emergency Readiness Team said in a note posted Thursday.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
What we've got here is "coffee confusion. " That's what a British survey found in determining that 70% of java drinkers couldn't figure out a latte from a mocha or a venti from a grande. So the Debenhams department store chain, based in London, replaced all the names with what it called "plain English. " Its new menu, announced this week, lets customers order a "frothy coffee" instead of a cappuccino. A caffe mocha is now a "chocolate flavored coffee" and a caffe latte is a "really, really milky coffee.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1985 | VAN WATERFORD, Waterford, of Pahoa, Hawaii, lived in Indonesia for 30 years and makes periodic visits there.
Bed and breakfast on the island of Java? Of course. And the ideal way to explore the island is to travel from guest house to guest house in a chauffeur-driven automobile. In the late '70s and early '80s a sudden nostalgic surge arose among the Dutch from the Netherlands, who had once lived and worked in their former colony. They had longings to visit the places where they were born, went to school and raised their families.
NEWS
December 26, 1999
Marnell Jameson must have been born in the '70s. Long before Starbucks was around, there were coffeehouses. Think back to the '50s when places like Pandora's Box in West Hollywood was there--sure it was also known for pot and good beat music that the flower children used to go to. Let's say it like it is: All those strange-sounding names are nothing more then status symbols for the snobs. Coffee is coffee, pure and simple. Give me a cup of java any day and I will add my own sugar, thank you. Redlands soon will have its snobbish Starbucks, and I don't look forward to the people it will bring here.
OPINION
May 29, 2012
The legal battle between Google and Oracle over the use of Java in Google's Android software is more than just another bruising patent fight between rival tech companies. The more unusual and disturbing aspect of the dispute is Oracle's claim to hold copyrights to Java's "application programming interfaces," or the bits of code that let apps written in Java work with other programs. Although a federal jury found that Google violated those copyrights (but not Oracle's patents), District Judge William Alsup can still hold that APIs aren't copyrightable.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is asking a judge to declare a mistrial after a federal jury in San Francisco rendered a split decision: the panel  ruled against the company in Oracle's copyright case over the search giant's popular Android mobile software but reaching an impasse on a key issue. The jury found for Oracle in the largest claim, but could not decide if Google's use of the copyrights was legally protected as “fair use.” Google prevailed on two other claims. Oracle has accused Google of stealing some of its Java technology to build Android.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|