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BUSINESS
June 27, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Mountain View-based Netscape Communications Corp. said a standards body accepted a programming technology that it proposed based on Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java language. JavaScript was accepted as a standard by a European association for standardizing information and communications systems. The software is designed to make it easier to publish programs and Internet sites using Java. Netscape, which makes Internet software, said it proposed the standard to the committee six months ago.
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TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
At the top of the mountain, where an attendant will take your $46 ticket, foot traffic is steady and cellphone reception is excellent. At the bottom of the same mountain, the town teems with pizzerias, tourists chatter in half a dozen languages and a school band director is herding his traditionally costumed students into formation. "Roki! Roki!" he seems to be hollering. And then, as darkness falls, his young trumpeters and drummers launch into the rousing theme from Sylvester Stallone's first hit movie.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | From Reuters
Sun Microsystems Inc. and Netscape Communications Corp. on Monday unveiled a programming language in a bid to beat rival Microsoft Corp. in the race to set standards for new Internet-based software.Microsoft, the world's biggest computer software company, is also investing heavily in developing programming software for Internet applications, and is expected to unveil its lineup of products later this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times. It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times . It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
At the top of the mountain, where an attendant will take your $46 ticket, foot traffic is steady and cellphone reception is excellent. At the bottom of the same mountain, the town teems with pizzerias, tourists chatter in half a dozen languages and a school band director is herding his traditionally costumed students into formation. "Roki! Roki!" he seems to be hollering. And then, as darkness falls, his young trumpeters and drummers launch into the rousing theme from Sylvester Stallone's first hit movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
John Charles Ward would take flight in the half-light before dawn, when he could race down the runway without headlights and ascend into the cloaking embrace of an overcast sky. This feature requires that JavaScript be enabled and the Flash plug-in be installed. John Charles Ward would take flight in the half-light before dawn, when he could race down the runway without headlights and ascend into the cloaking embrace of an overcast sky. Soaring above the crowded California freeways in the single-engine aircraft, he'd relax, pour himself a whiskey and Seven and plan his hopscotch route to Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Has your 4-year-old contribution to an anti-gay marriage law suddenly resurfaced on the Internet? Then you know exactly what Brendan Eich, co-founder of Mozilla, inventor of JavaScript, and general developer hero, is going through when it recently came to light that back in 2008, he made a $1,000 contribution to support Proposition 8 . The record of the donation has been available since at least 2008, but it was rediscovered by the...
BUSINESS
June 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Yahoo Inc. said it had contained a malicious program aimed at the millions of people who use its e-mail service, which ranks as the world's largest.As a precaution against variations on the "Yamanner" worm, Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Yahoo advised its e-mail users to update their antivirus programs and block incoming e-mail from av3@yahoo.com.The worm came in an e-mail containing JavaScript and contained "New Graphic Site" in the subject field.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1999
Is there really a shortage of high-technology workers? The high-tech industry continues to proclaim that recent college graduates are earning salaries averaging $47,000. I earned my bachelor's degree in computer science in 1995, have been constantly updating my skills, and always remain dedicated to my work. As of today, I make not a penny over $35,000 per year developing Web sites using PERL, ODBC and JavaScript for a large, international corporation. Is there really a shortage, or is Corporate America simply desperate for dirt-cheap labor?
BUSINESS
June 27, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Mountain View-based Netscape Communications Corp. said a standards body accepted a programming technology that it proposed based on Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java language. JavaScript was accepted as a standard by a European association for standardizing information and communications systems. The software is designed to make it easier to publish programs and Internet sites using Java. Netscape, which makes Internet software, said it proposed the standard to the committee six months ago.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | From Reuters
Sun Microsystems Inc. and Netscape Communications Corp. on Monday unveiled a programming language in a bid to beat rival Microsoft Corp. in the race to set standards for new Internet-based software.Microsoft, the world's biggest computer software company, is also investing heavily in developing programming software for Internet applications, and is expected to unveil its lineup of products later this week.
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