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Javed Iqbal

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NEWS
December 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who confessed to killing 100 children surrendered at the office of Pakistan's largest Urdu-language newspaper. Javed Iqbal, 40, had been the target of a massive manhunt since early this month, when he wrote a letter to police that led them to the remains of two bodies as well as the pictures and clothes of many of the 100 boys he said he killed. He walked into the building that houses the Jang newspaper in Lahore and said he wanted to write a confession, editor Shaheen Quereshi said.
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WORLD
March 16, 2010 | Reuters
A U.S. drone aircraft fired missiles into Pakistan's North Waziristan region on Tuesday, killing three militants, the latest such strike on a major al Qaeda and Taliban sanctuary, officials and residents said. The attack targeted a militant compound in the Datta Kheil area, about 40 km (25 miles) west of North Waziristan's main town of Miranshah. "Smoke is rising from the burning compound," Javed Iqbal, a resident of Datta Kheil, told Reuters by telephone. U.S. officials say the pilotless drones are one of the most effective weapons against militants.
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NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two men accused of agreeing to broadcast Hezbollah's television channel to U.S. customers will face trial on terrorism charges in January, U.S. District Judge Richard Berman ruled. Javed Iqbal, 44, and Saleh Elahwal, 55, face what defense lawyers call one of the more unusual terrorism cases. The charges stem from negotiations that Iqbal and Elahwal allegedly conducted on behalf of their company, HDTV Ltd., with Beirut-based Al Manar. The U.S. classifies the channel and its sponsor, Hezbollah, as terrorist organizations.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two men accused of agreeing to broadcast Hezbollah's television channel to U.S. customers will face trial on terrorism charges in January, U.S. District Judge Richard Berman ruled. Javed Iqbal, 44, and Saleh Elahwal, 55, face what defense lawyers call one of the more unusual terrorism cases. The charges stem from negotiations that Iqbal and Elahwal allegedly conducted on behalf of their company, HDTV Ltd., with Beirut-based Al Manar. The U.S. classifies the channel and its sponsor, Hezbollah, as terrorist organizations.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | Reuters
A U.S. drone aircraft fired missiles into Pakistan's North Waziristan region on Tuesday, killing three militants, the latest such strike on a major al Qaeda and Taliban sanctuary, officials and residents said. The attack targeted a militant compound in the Datta Kheil area, about 40 km (25 miles) west of North Waziristan's main town of Miranshah. "Smoke is rising from the burning compound," Javed Iqbal, a resident of Datta Kheil, told Reuters by telephone. U.S. officials say the pilotless drones are one of the most effective weapons against militants.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A businessman was charged with providing satellite broadcasts of a Hezbollah television station to New York-area customers, authorities said. Javed Iqbal, 42, was arrested on conspiracy charges in the alleged enabling of the broadcasts of Al Manar, which was designated by the U.S. government this spring as a global terrorist entity, U.S. Atty. Michael J. Garcia said in a statement.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | Associated Press
A court sentence that calls for a serial killer to be executed much as his victims died--strangled publicly, with his body then cut into 100 pieces and dissolved in a vat of acid--violates the tenets of Islam, Pakistan's top religious body ruled Monday. The sentence runs contrary to Islamic teachings that prohibit the desecration of a body, said the state-run Council of Islamic Ideology, which oversees Pakistani laws to ensure that they do not contravene Islamic tenets.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Pakistani man sentenced to be strangled, chopped into pieces and dissolved in acid for the murders of 100 children was found dead in his cell in an apparent suicide, authorities said. An accomplice in the crimes was also found dead. The bodies of Javed Iqbal and his 14-year-old accomplice, Sabir, were sent to a hospital for autopsies. "They have committed suicide by taking some poisonous substance," a jail official said in Lahore.
WORLD
September 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
Thirty-five Pakistani prisoners released from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba returned home Saturday, a senior Interior Ministry official said. Pakistani authorities detained the men for questioning after they arrived at a Pakistani air base near the capital, Islamabad, said Brig. Javed Iqbal Cheema, director-general of the National Crisis Management Cell at the Interior Ministry. He said the men would be allowed to go home after the interrogations were completed.
WORLD
July 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
Eleven Pakistanis freed from the U.S. military prison holding suspected terrorists in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have arrived in Pakistan, a senior Pakistani Interior Ministry official said Thursday. Brig. Javed Iqbal Cheema, head of the National Crisis Management Cell at the ministry, said Pakistani security officials planned to interrogate the men before allowing them to return to their homes. Their identities were not immediately disclosed.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who confessed to killing 100 children surrendered at the office of Pakistan's largest Urdu-language newspaper. Javed Iqbal, 40, had been the target of a massive manhunt since early this month, when he wrote a letter to police that led them to the remains of two bodies as well as the pictures and clothes of many of the 100 boys he said he killed. He walked into the building that houses the Jang newspaper in Lahore and said he wanted to write a confession, editor Shaheen Quereshi said.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hoping to bring a man who confessed to killing 100 children out of hiding, Pakistani police on Saturday arrested his ex-wife, daughter and son, the state-run news agency said. On Thursday, police received a letter from a man who identified himself as Javed Iqbal. In the letter, Iqbal said he sexually assaulted the 100 children before killing them. He said that he is a trained chemical engineer and that he used chemicals to dispose of the bodies.
WORLD
July 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Taliban militant who became one of Pakistan's most wanted rebel leaders after his release from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, killed himself with a hand grenade Tuesday to avoid capture, officials said. The death of Abdullah Mehsud, who lost a leg years ago fighting for the Taliban, was a boost for Pakistani authorities under pressure from the U.S. to crack down on Taliban and Al Qaeda militants fighting on both sides of the Afghan border.
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