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Javier Francisco Ovando

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
October 3, 1999
Sen. Tom Hayden (Commentary, Sept. 28) calls the Los Angeles Police Department "the very agency responsible for putting a bullet in [Javier Francisco Ovando's] head, leaving him wheelchair bound for life and framing him." It's not just a dozen rogue officers who are responsible, according to Hayden, but the entire department, every one of the other 9,640 men and women of the LAPD. Now, instead of playing the race card, we have polemicists playing the cop card. We deserve a more reasoned approach from our elected representatives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2003 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
The mother of a 16-year-old gang member who was killed on the border of a rival gang's territory just minutes after two Los Angeles police officers released him from the back of their patrol car filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Monday against the officers, alleging they were directly responsible for her son's death. The Nov. 5, 1996, shooting death of Eric Vega, whose street name was Baby Happy, was the focus of a district attorney's investigation during the Rampart corruption scandal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 23-year-old Los Angeles man who received a record $15-million settlement after he was shot and paralyzed by Los Angeles police officers is facing drug charges after heading here for a gambling getaway. Javier Francisco Ovando was among six people arrested when his Las Vegas-bound vehicle was stopped for speeding just inside the Nevada state line March 13 by officers from the California and Nevada highway patrols.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 23-year-old Los Angeles man who received a record $15-million settlement after he was shot and paralyzed by Los Angeles police officers is facing drug charges after heading here for a gambling getaway. Javier Francisco Ovando was among six people arrested when his Las Vegas-bound vehicle was stopped for speeding just inside the Nevada state line March 13 by officers from the California and Nevada highway patrols.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | STEPHEN YAGMAN, Stephen Yagman is a federal civil rights lawyer who specializes in police brutality cases, and who frequently has sued the LAPD. He was suspended for a year from practicing law in California, beginning in October 1998, for overbilling a client
The state criminal bench is chock full of former prosecutors--lawyers who spent their entire legal careers believing cops, and who are highly unlikely to believe anyone who refutes what a cop has to say. The justice system suffers dearly from this phenomenon, which is in part the product of 16 years' worth of former Republican governors like George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson going to the prosecutors' pool for more than half of all their judicial picks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2003 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
The mother of a 16-year-old gang member who was killed on the border of a rival gang's territory just minutes after two Los Angeles police officers released him from the back of their patrol car filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Monday against the officers, alleging they were directly responsible for her son's death. The Nov. 5, 1996, shooting death of Eric Vega, whose street name was Baby Happy, was the focus of a district attorney's investigation during the Rampart corruption scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999 | TOM HAYDEN, State Sen. Tom Hayden is a Democrat representing parts of West Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley
At the center of the unfolding scandal at the LAPD's Rampart Division CRASH unit, something very weird--and wrong--is going on. In a strange role reversal, the one-time tormentor of 18th Street gang member Javier Francisco Ovando is now his protector.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Javier Francisco Ovando, the 22-year-old man at the center of a worsening Los Angeles Police Department scandal, spoke by telephone with his 2 1/2-year-old daughter for the first time Sunday, attorneys for the daughter said. But instead of the happy event it should have been, the conversation between Ovando, his daughter, Destiny, and the child's mother, Monique Valenzuela, dissolved into tears and recriminations, said the attorneys. The circumstances surrounding the 12:15 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for the 2-year-old daughter of a man who was shot and then allegedly framed by two Los Angeles police officers said Wednesday they are filing a $20-million claim against the city. The claim, filed on behalf of Destiny Ovando, is a precursor to a lawsuit and is the first such action against the city in connection with the ongoing LAPD corruption probe, authorities said.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
It was late last September when the Los Angeles cop who sullied the badge and turned stoolie, Rafael A. Perez, explained what made him want to be a police officer in the first place. Having grown up in Philadelphia watching '70s cops-and-robbers television fiction such as "Adam 12" and "CHiPs," Perez once told Times reporters in a phone interview from the L.A.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
It was late last September when the Los Angeles cop who sullied the badge and turned stoolie, Rafael A. Perez, explained what made him want to be a police officer in the first place. Having grown up in Philadelphia watching '70s cops-and-robbers television fiction such as "Adam 12" and "CHiPs," Perez once told Times reporters in a phone interview from the L.A.
OPINION
October 3, 1999
Sen. Tom Hayden (Commentary, Sept. 28) calls the Los Angeles Police Department "the very agency responsible for putting a bullet in [Javier Francisco Ovando's] head, leaving him wheelchair bound for life and framing him." It's not just a dozen rogue officers who are responsible, according to Hayden, but the entire department, every one of the other 9,640 men and women of the LAPD. Now, instead of playing the race card, we have polemicists playing the cop card. We deserve a more reasoned approach from our elected representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for the 2-year-old daughter of a man who was shot and then allegedly framed by two Los Angeles police officers said Wednesday they are filing a $20-million claim against the city. The claim, filed on behalf of Destiny Ovando, is a precursor to a lawsuit and is the first such action against the city in connection with the ongoing LAPD corruption probe, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999 | TOM HAYDEN, State Sen. Tom Hayden is a Democrat representing parts of West Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley
At the center of the unfolding scandal at the LAPD's Rampart Division CRASH unit, something very weird--and wrong--is going on. In a strange role reversal, the one-time tormentor of 18th Street gang member Javier Francisco Ovando is now his protector.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling corruption at the Los Angeles Police Department "a cancer . . . that has gone on a long time without being treated," the jailed ex-officer who is the central figure in an ongoing probe of misconduct said Monday that he and other officers routinely abused their power to win praise from their superiors. Rafael A.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Javier Francisco Ovando, the 22-year-old man at the center of a worsening Los Angeles Police Department scandal, spoke by telephone with his 2 1/2-year-old daughter for the first time Sunday, attorneys for the daughter said. But instead of the happy event it should have been, the conversation between Ovando, his daughter, Destiny, and the child's mother, Monique Valenzuela, dissolved into tears and recriminations, said the attorneys. The circumstances surrounding the 12:15 p.m.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities said Friday that their civil rights investigation into the expanding Los Angeles Police Department corruption scandal is also focusing on the February 1998 beating of a handcuffed suspect held inside the Rampart station. Brian Hewitt, 34, the officer who allegedly beat the young man, was also involved in one of the station's controversial shootings, which left one man dead and two wounded. Hewitt fired seven of the 10 rounds discharged during the July 1996 incident.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling corruption at the Los Angeles Police Department "a cancer . . . that has gone on a long time without being treated," the jailed ex-officer who is the central figure in an ongoing probe of misconduct said Monday that he and other officers routinely abused their power to win praise from their superiors. Rafael A.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities said Friday that their civil rights investigation into the expanding Los Angeles Police Department corruption scandal is also focusing on the February 1998 beating of a handcuffed suspect held inside the Rampart station. Brian Hewitt, 34, the officer who allegedly beat the young man, was also involved in one of the station's controversial shootings, which left one man dead and two wounded. Hewitt fired seven of the 10 rounds discharged during the July 1996 incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | STEPHEN YAGMAN, Stephen Yagman is a federal civil rights lawyer who specializes in police brutality cases, and who frequently has sued the LAPD. He was suspended for a year from practicing law in California, beginning in October 1998, for overbilling a client
The state criminal bench is chock full of former prosecutors--lawyers who spent their entire legal careers believing cops, and who are highly unlikely to believe anyone who refutes what a cop has to say. The justice system suffers dearly from this phenomenon, which is in part the product of 16 years' worth of former Republican governors like George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson going to the prosecutors' pool for more than half of all their judicial picks.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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