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Javier Sotomayor

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June 15, 1989
Sergei Bubka of the Soviet Union and Javier Sotomayor of Cuba won their events but neither broke his world record at an International Amateur Athletic Federation track and field meet in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. Bubka won the pole vault at 19 feet 2 1/4 inches. He failed in his attempt at 19-11 1/4, three-quarters of an inch higher than the mark he set last July in Nice, France. Sotomayor won the high jump with a leap of 7-9 3/4 but failed in his bid to become the first jumper to clear eight feet.
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SPORTS
October 13, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Javier Sotomayor, the only high jumper to clear eight feet, will retire next week, the Cuban news agency Prensa Latina said Friday. The 1992 Olympic champion, who turns 34 today, won the silver medal at last year's Sydney Games. He successfully fought a ban from competition after testing positive for cocaine. During a career of more than two decades, Sotomayor broke five world records, two of which he still holds--8-0 outdoors and 7-11 indoors.
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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High jumping, in the pharmaceutical sense of the term, was the topic of discussion Sunday at Olympic Stadium after Cuba's Javier Sotomayor completed the most unlikely leap of his 15-year career: Busted for cocaine in 1999, Olympic silver medalist in 2000. Sotomayor, the only man to clear 8 feet in the high jump, was banned from competition for two years by the International Amateur Athletic Federation after testing positive for cocaine at the Pan American Games in August 1999.
SPORTS
July 30, 1989 | Associated Press
Cuba's Javier Sotomayor became the first person to high jump 8 feet, setting a world record Saturday night in the Caribbean Championships. "It is a fantastic feat because I am the first man in jumping the eight feet, and that is fabulous," Sotomayor said. Sotomayor set the previous mark of 7-11 1/2 in 1988 at Salamanca, Spain. At that time, his jump broke the previous outdoor world record of 7-11 set by Patrick Sjoeberg of Sweden in Stockholm on June 6, 1987.
SPORTS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Javier Sotomayor, the only high jumper to clear eight feet, apparently is out of the Sydney Olympics after his suspension Tuesday for using cocaine. Cuban authorities said they would fight the ruling by an arbitration panel of the IAAF, track and field's world governing federation, which said Sotomayor committed a drug violation at last year's Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada, and banned him until July 31, 2001.
SPORTS
September 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Javier Sotomayor of Cuba broke the world record in the high jump Thursday. Sotomayor, 22, set the record with a jump of 7 feet 11 1/2 inches, a quarter-inch more than the previous world record, set by Patrick Sjoeberg of Sweden on June 6, 1987, at Stockholm. Sotomayor made his first jump at 7-10 1/2 and set the mark on his second jump. It was the first outdoor world record set in Spain. Renaldo Nehemiah of the United States won the 110-meter hurdles in 13.
SPORTS
July 31, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
It was fitting that a track and field meet sponsored by a company named Jack in the Box should feature jumpers. Al Franken, promoter of the invitational next Sunday at UCLA's Drake Stadium, assumed it would be long jumpers. He even arranged for the first man to break Bob Beamon's world record of 29-2 1/2 at the meet to receive a $500,000 bonus.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High jumping, in the pharmaceutical sense of the term, was the topic of discussion Sunday at Olympic Stadium after Cuba's Javier Sotomayor completed the most unlikely leap of his 15-year career: Busted for cocaine in 1999, Olympic silver medalist in 2000. Sotomayor, the only man to clear 8 feet in the high jump, was banned from competition for two years by the International Amateur Athletic Federation after testing positive for cocaine at the Pan American Games in August 1999.
SPORTS
August 3, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four days before the opening ceremony of the 1988 Olympics, Cuba's Javier Sotomayor broke the world high jump record at a meet in Spain. But instead of boarding a plane bound for Seoul as the gold-medal favorite, he returned home as a pawn in a political game that brought him quickly back to earth.
SPORTS
August 3, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cuban high jump champion Javier Sotomayor was cleared Wednesday to compete in the Olympics, track and field's ruling body cutting his suspension for cocaine use in half. The International Amateur Athletic Federation cited "exceptional circumstances" for the move, pointing to his previously clean drug record and humanitarian work.
SPORTS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Javier Sotomayor, the only high jumper to clear eight feet, apparently is out of the Sydney Olympics after his suspension Tuesday for using cocaine. Cuban authorities said they would fight the ruling by an arbitration panel of the IAAF, track and field's world governing federation, which said Sotomayor committed a drug violation at last year's Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada, and banned him until July 31, 2001.
SPORTS
August 17, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ben Johnson is gone for good from track and field, and Javier Sotomayor may not be back for two years. Johnson, the Canadian sprinter who was banned for life in 1993 after a second positive drug test, lost his bid for reinstatement Monday, and Sotomayor, the Cuban world-record holder in the high jump, was told he must face doping charges over his positive cocaine test. In Seville, Spain, the International Amateur Athletic Federation rejected a petition to allow Johnson to return to competition.
SPORTS
August 5, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cuban high jump champion Javier Sotomayor was stripped of his gold medal at the Pan American Games on Wednesday after testing positive for cocaine in Winnipeg, Canada. Sotomayor, the world-record holder and the only man to clear eight feet in the event, will be suspended for two years--knocking him out of this month's world championships and the 2000 Sydney Olympics, said Primo Nebiolo, president of the International Amateur Athletic Assn., track and field's governing body.
SPORTS
August 3, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four days before the opening ceremony of the 1988 Olympics, Cuba's Javier Sotomayor broke the world high jump record at a meet in Spain. But instead of boarding a plane bound for Seoul as the gold-medal favorite, he returned home as a pawn in a political game that brought him quickly back to earth.
SPORTS
August 11, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most anticipated head-to-head matchup in the track and field portion of the Pan American Games fizzled Saturday, but Cuban fans were at least treated to a Pan American Games record. Javier Sotomayor, the world record-holder in the high jump, broke his own Pan Am record with a winning jump of 7 feet 8 1/2 inches. His former record, set in 1987, was 7-7 1/4--the height cleared by two men who, it was hoped, would inject some pizazz into a lackluster week of track and field.
SPORTS
August 1, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Charlie Dumas, the first person to high jump seven feet, had a crisp reaction Monday to news that a Cuban had become the first to clear eight feet. "What took so long?" he asked. It had been 33 years and 30 days since Dumas, then a Compton College freshman, broke the seven-foot barrier at the 1956 U.S. Olympic trials at the Coliseum. "I'm really surprised it took this long," Dumas said.
SPORTS
August 5, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cuban high jump champion Javier Sotomayor was stripped of his gold medal at the Pan American Games on Wednesday after testing positive for cocaine in Winnipeg, Canada. Sotomayor, the world-record holder and the only man to clear eight feet in the event, will be suspended for two years--knocking him out of this month's world championships and the 2000 Sydney Olympics, said Primo Nebiolo, president of the International Amateur Athletic Assn., track and field's governing body.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, there were barriers--a seven-foot high jump, the four-minute mile, the 60-foot shot put. But between 1954 and '56, those standards of human performance went the way of the Studebaker. Charlie Dumas jumped seven feet, Roger Bannister ran the mile in 3:59.4 and Parry O'Brien put the shot 60 feet 5 1/4 inches. So, new boundaries were established. In high jumping, that meant only one thing--eight feet. Ninety-six inches. Two hundred, forty-four centimeters.
SPORTS
August 1, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Charlie Dumas, the first person to high jump seven feet, had a crisp reaction Monday to news that a Cuban had become the first to clear eight feet. "What took so long?" he asked. It had been 33 years and 30 days since Dumas, then a Compton College freshman, broke the seven-foot barrier at the 1956 U.S. Olympic trials at the Coliseum. "I'm really surprised it took this long," Dumas said.
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