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OPINION
February 18, 2004
The deaths of two children found hanging in their cells at the Preston Youth Correctional Facility in January provide another reason for public outrage at a juvenile justice system that is designed only to punish young offenders without also rehabilitating them. Worst of all is the current trend toward trying children in adult courts and housing them in adult facilities, where they are eight times more likely to attempt suicide. At Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, nine children still remain locked in their cells for up to 23 1/2 hours at a stretch, despite a unanimous decision by the Board of Supervisors to relocate the children and even though a parallel California Youth Authority facility has been constructed and staffed to accommodate the Men's Central juveniles.
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OPINION
February 18, 2004
The deaths of two children found hanging in their cells at the Preston Youth Correctional Facility in January provide another reason for public outrage at a juvenile justice system that is designed only to punish young offenders without also rehabilitating them. Worst of all is the current trend toward trying children in adult courts and housing them in adult facilities, where they are eight times more likely to attempt suicide. At Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, nine children still remain locked in their cells for up to 23 1/2 hours at a stretch, despite a unanimous decision by the Board of Supervisors to relocate the children and even though a parallel California Youth Authority facility has been constructed and staffed to accommodate the Men's Central juveniles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
An outspoken Roman Catholic lay chaplain honored last month by an international human rights group for his jailhouse ministry has sued Los Angeles County to allow him to return to the jail and continue his work with juvenile inmates. Six months ago, Javier Stauring, director of detention ministry for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, was barred from the county jail after he publicly criticized the living conditions of juvenile inmates awaiting trial on charges of murder and other adult crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
An outspoken Roman Catholic lay chaplain honored last month by an international human rights group for his jailhouse ministry has sued Los Angeles County to allow him to return to the jail and continue his work with juvenile inmates. Six months ago, Javier Stauring, director of detention ministry for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, was barred from the county jail after he publicly criticized the living conditions of juvenile inmates awaiting trial on charges of murder and other adult crimes.
OPINION
January 12, 2003
As part of my responsibilities as co-director of Detention Ministry for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, I have become aware of conditions similar to those reported in "Many Refugee Kids Face Tough Times in INS Detention" (Jan. 3). More than 200 children detained annually by the Immigration and Naturalization Service in L.A. County juvenile halls suffer from a lack of access to adequate medical care, scarce outdoor recreation and minimal contact with family members and even, at times, are physically abused.
OPINION
January 9, 2002
Re "Girls Convicted as Adults Serve Time in Solitary," Jan. 3: I am a 17-year-old girl, and as I read this story about Noemi I couldn't help but be shocked at the thought that the jail system doesn't know the difference between an adult and a teenager. I don't try to justify Noemi's actions; however, I agree with Javier Stauring, director of the juvenile detention ministry of the Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, when he says, "It's a dungeon." Isolation, as I have heard, is only given to those people who have committed extremely serious crimes or who get out of hand while in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2012 | Scott Gold and Louis Sahagun
From humble beginnings in southwest Mexico, Gabino Zavala entered the priesthood and embarked on a remarkable journey that landed him squarely in the corner offices of the nation's largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. An auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, he oversaw the church's vast San Gabriel region, a diverse community considered vital to the future of the church. Then, from his pulpit, he became a forceful champion for social and economic justice. Popular and approachable, Zavala was widely known by his first name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2003 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
Two Roman Catholic chaplains well known in Los Angeles said they were told Friday that they no longer have access to minister in the County Jail and that the reason was their public criticism this week of conditions at a juvenile detention facility. Father Gregory Boyle and lay minister Javier Stauring said the decision was made by the Sheriff's Department and conveyed by the head chaplain at the jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2005 | Andrew Wang, Times Staff Writer
Javier Stauring spent two years fighting to get back into a place most people avoid. Last week, the 43-year-old Roman Catholic lay chaplain headed back to Men's Central Jail, the foreboding downtown Los Angeles structure he publicly denounced in 2003 for the grim conditions he saw while ministering to inmates in its juvenile cellblock. It took a freedom-of-speech lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to get him there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the gold crucifixes worn with cool zoot suits in the 1940s to the intricate tattoos of the Virgin of Guadalupe on some gang members today, religious icons have long formed an integral part of Latino youth culture. Holy images can be found throughout Southern California, especially where the Latino population is concentrated. Rosaries dangle around a teenage girl's neck. The face of Christ ringed with a crown of thorns is etched on a young man's arm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Desperately alone in his dark world, 20-year-old Jesus Orbina began to shake and cry uncontrollably when a message delivered to prisoners throughout the world Sunday came to him inside the Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail. You have not been forgotten, the suicidal Orbina was told. People out there love you.
OPINION
May 2, 2004 | James Bell and Javier Stauring
When Alan Feaster said goodbye to his 18-year-old son, Durrell, at the Preston training school run by the California Youth Authority, he never thought it would be for the last time. Just weeks later, in January, his son was dead, the victim of an apparent double suicide with his cellmate, acts of desperation that in all likelihood were connected to conditions our state has allowed to fester in its prisons for troubled youth.
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