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August 7, 2004 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
If Hollywood ever decides to make another "Jaws" movie, it should think twice about using a water skier as shark bait. That would be dated. That's because the most popular water sport today is wakeboarding, a confluence of surfing, water skiing, snowboarding and skateboarding. It's the fastest growing water sport worldwide and will be one of the featured events at the X Games, beginning today at 10:30 a.m. at the Long Beach Marine Stadium.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1985 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The great shark circled its prey silently, its sharp teeth glistening and its huge, fin-topped gray body leaving ripples of excitement in its wake. Jim Frankle yelled to catch the attention of a group of teen-age restaurant workers in its path. "A fish sandwich and a Coke," he shouted. The Land Shark was on the loose in Woodland Hills. And Frankle was at the helm as he steered it to the McDonald's restaurant drive-up window to place an order.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A beachfront setting, tours of a lighthouse rarely glimpsed by the public and a nearby international film festival drew thousands Sunday for the Port Hueneme Harbor Days Festival. Throughout its 46-year history, the two-day event has been an annual standard for many, as evidenced by the multiple-generation families here for the festival and its Saturday parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987 | DONNA ROSENTHAL
Can Universal smell money the way a shark smells blood? What else would lure the studio back to the potentially troubled waters of this winter-bound resort to re-create Amity, N.Y., for "Jaws: The Revenge," the fourth thriller in the saga of the world's hungriest Great White Shark? (The other three have grossed $382.5 million domestically at the box office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2009 | Trevor Jensen
Charles Teitel, who operated one of the first foreign art houses in Chicago, screening such seminal films as "The Bicycle Thief" and "Z" as well as movies that city censors tried to ban for racy content, died of congestive heart failure April 4 at his home in Laguna Woods, his daughter Roberta Teitel Zweig said. He was 93. Teitel followed his father, Abraham, into the film distribution and theater business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Frank Mundus, a Long Island shark fisherman who became famous for catching gargantuan great whites and was thought by many to have been the inspiration for the irascible Capt. Quint character in the novel and movie "Jaws," has died. He was 82. Mundus, who retired from his charter-boat business in the early '90s and moved to Hawaii's Big Island, died after a heart attack Wednesday at the Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu, said his wife, Jeannette. Described by Newsweek magazine in 1978 as "the most celebrated shark fisherman in the world," Mundus fished out of Montauk, N.Y., for 40 years on his 42-foot boat Cricket II. Over the decades, he caught a number of great whites, including a 4,500-pound shark harpooned in 1964, and helped catch a 3,427-pounder on a rod and reel in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1990 | SEAN MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can't train spiders, Frank Marshall discovered, and he should know. As a second unit director working for Steven Spielberg and Robert Zemeckis on movies like "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" and "Back to the Future," Marshall earned a reputation for his skill in pulling bravura performances from snakes and rats and dogs. Spiders proved to be another matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there was Universal Pictures' "Jaws" the movie, then Universal Studios Tours' Jaws the ride. You saw "Earthquake," and later there came Earthquake the attraction. After "E.T." and the 1976 "King Kong"--bingo, E.T. and King Kong rides. Now, in the latest sequel of Hollywood-meets-the-tourist-dollar, Universal Studios Hollywood presents Backdraft, a behind-the-scenes attraction based on the studio's 1991 firefighting movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
There was a time when a Steven Spielberg summer movie was the surest bet a thrill-hungry kid could hope for, and the box office usually showed it. But with the release on Friday of the comedy-drama "The Terminal," Spielberg is securing his bid to be the surest bet a smarts-starved adult could make in a popcorn-filled movie season. This shift for the legendary director has been underway for years, since his Holocaust epic, "Schindler's List," revealed a willingness to tackle weightier material.
SPORTS
September 4, 1998 | PETE THOMAS
Next thing you know, sea gulls will band together and wage bloody war against mankind. . . . OK, so that only happens in the movies. But this has been a bizarre summer for interaction between man and beast. Some examples: * Last week a great white shark attacked body-boarder Jonathan Kathrein, 16, of Lucas Valley, off Stinson Beach near San Francisco. Kathrein said he screamed after being bumped, then was attacked by a juvenile white shark measuring seven or eight feet.
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