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Jay Alan Sekulow

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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the height of the ferocious street battles that nearly paralyzed Wichita, Kan., in the summer of 1991, the only man standing between Operation Rescue leader Randall Terry and a jail cell was a fast-talking, Brooklyn-born attorney who began life as a self-described "nice Jewish boy." Standing next to Terry in court, Jay Alan Sekulow did his best to keep Operation Rescue's leader out of jail and on the street, spreading his militantly anti-abortion message.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the height of the ferocious street battles that nearly paralyzed Wichita, Kan., in the summer of 1991, the only man standing between Operation Rescue leader Randall Terry and a jail cell was a fast-talking, Brooklyn-born attorney who began life as a self-described "nice Jewish boy." Standing next to Terry in court, Jay Alan Sekulow did his best to keep Operation Rescue's leader out of jail and on the street, spreading his militantly anti-abortion message.
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NEWS
June 8, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Alan Sekulow, the attorney who won his fourth U.S. Supreme Court victory on free speech and religion Monday, owes much of his prominence to exposure on the nation's largest Christian broadcasting network, the Tustin-based empire of Paul Crouch Sr. Through his Trinity Broadcast Network and contributions totaling $3 million to nonprofit organizations controlled by Sekulow, Crouch has played a major role in boosting Sekulow's career as the best-known attorney for the Religious Right.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Alan Sekulow, the attorney who won his fourth U.S. Supreme Court victory on free speech and religion Monday, owes much of his prominence to exposure on the nation's largest Christian broadcasting network, the Tustin-based empire of Paul Crouch Sr. Through his Trinity Broadcast Network and contributions totaling $3 million to nonprofit organizations controlled by Sekulow, Crouch has played a major role in boosting Sekulow's career as the best-known attorney for the Religious Right.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
State courts should deal with abortion protesters who block access to clinics, Bush Administration officials told the Supreme Court on Wednesday, but a lawyer for clinic owners said protests in Wichita, Kan., showed that "states need federal help." The high court has a Virginia case under study, but lawyer John Schafer offered a reminder of the upheaval in Wichita caused when Operation Rescue targeted abortion clinics in that city. Hundreds of the anti-abortion group's members were arrested.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In two victories for religious-rights advocates, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that public schools may not discriminate against speakers simply because their message is religious and let stand a ruling permitting students to offer a prayer at a graduation ceremony. Taken together, the decisions convey the message that public schools need not be religion-free zones.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antiabortion protesters, challenging efforts to limit their activities at abortion clinics, told the Supreme Court on Wednesday that their right to free speech allowed them to confront pregnant women on the sidewalks and urge them to reconsider what they were about to do. "Speech-free zones" violate the 1st Amendment, attorney Jay Alan Sekulow, representing the protesters, said during oral arguments before the high court.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest battles in the culture war will be fought at the Supreme Court, starting today. The justices will meet this morning for the first time after their holiday recess to consider a highly charged set of appeals, including whether the Boy Scouts can exclude openly gay individuals and whether states can outlaw "partial-birth" abortions. The court is expected to announce later today its decision on hearing several of these new cases.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's move to funnel more federal money to "faith-based organizations" will test the legal line separating church and state, constitutional experts said Monday. For more than a century, the Supreme Court has said that church-run hospitals can receive government aid because these facilities are providing medical care, not promoting religion. The court has also allowed some public money to flow to religious schools if it is spent only for nonreligious purposes.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
With only two justices voting to hear the case, the Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider restoring the traditional supper prayers at Virginia Military Institute, a public college. The high court's action is the latest in a long line of decisions that tell school officials they must not promote religion or lead group prayers -- even among college students preparing for military careers. Last year, the normally conservative 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, on the first day of its fall term, agreed Monday to decide whether city officials can bar religious groups and others from distributing leaflets within Los Angeles International Airport. The case poses the question of whether busy public airports are legally similar to streets and parks--and therefore open to everyone--or whether the corridors of the terminal can be restricted "exclusively to those activities that benefit the traveling public."
NATIONAL
December 3, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, obviously divided, argued Tuesday over whether the Constitution sometimes requires the government to use tax money to help pay for the training of religious clergy, even when taxpayers oppose the idea. It "is the plainest form of religious discrimination" to deny a state scholarship to a college student who is studying to become a minister, Solicitor Gen. Theodore B. Olson, arguing for the Bush administration, said.
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