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Jay Barbree

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Only one person on the planet has covered every manned launch out of Cape Canaveral, and now, on the eve of the 50th anniversary of spaceflight, he's written a book about it. Veteran NBC space correspondent Jay Barbree's memoir, "Live From Cape Canaveral," was released this month by Smithsonian Books. "There are an awful lot of guys . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Only one person on the planet has covered every manned launch out of Cape Canaveral, and now, on the eve of the 50th anniversary of spaceflight, he's written a book about it. Veteran NBC space correspondent Jay Barbree's memoir, "Live From Cape Canaveral," was released this month by Smithsonian Books. "There are an awful lot of guys . . .
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NEWS
July 10, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. With those immortal words, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped on the ghostly lunar surface, becoming the first man to walk on the moon. It was July 20, 1969, and the whole world sat enraptured in front of TV sets as the haunting black-and-white images were beamed back to Earth. But few knew the real story behind America's 10-year race to beat the Soviet Union to the moon. Until now.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. With those immortal words, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped on the ghostly lunar surface, becoming the first man to walk on the moon. It was July 20, 1969, and the whole world sat enraptured in front of TV sets as the haunting black-and-white images were beamed back to Earth. But few knew the real story behind America's 10-year race to beat the Soviet Union to the moon. Until now.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994 | Terry Bisson, Terry Bisson is the author of "Bears Discover Fire" and "Voyage to the Red Planet."
Remember when man went to the moon? You may have missed it. Lots of us did. The summer of 1969 was tipped steeply toward the future, and for those of us who were certain that the U.S. empire was in its final days, who were making sandwiches for the radical underground or packing our bags for the back-country communes, and for millions of the less alienated as well, Neil Armstrong's first step onto another world seemed, already, ancient history....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Like most major news organizations, CBS, NBC and ABC didn't have large staffs covering what proved to be the fatal launch of the space shuttle Challenger on Jan. 28, 1986. The launches had become so routine that the networks didn't put it on live, leaving that to the Cable News Network--which gave the nation its first horrified look at the fiery blast that killed the Challenger's seven-member crew, including schoolteacher Sharon Christa McAuliffe.
BOOKS
December 3, 1995 | RICHARD WATSON, Richard Watson teaches philosophy at Washington University. His most recent books are "The Philosopher's Demise: Learning French" and "Representational Ideas From Plato to Patricia Churchland."
I had visions of books by Elaine Pagels, John Searle, Edward O. Wilson, Daniel Dennett, Stephen Jay Gould, books by eggheads read by eggheads in other fields for fun. The books arrived. But these aren't egghead, I said--they're coffee table. The heavens, the body, carnival, compendia, funny maps. The cover of the funny map book riveted me. There, in the center of the picture bearing the blurb: "An Eccentric Map featuring towns that actually exist!" was Gravity, Iowa.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994 | Terry Bisson, Terry Bisson is the author of "Bears Discover Fire" and "Voyage to the Red Planet."
Remember when man went to the moon? You may have missed it. Lots of us did. The summer of 1969 was tipped steeply toward the future, and for those of us who were certain that the U.S. empire was in its final days, who were making sandwiches for the radical underground or packing our bags for the back-country communes, and for millions of the less alienated as well, Neil Armstrong's first step onto another world seemed, already, ancient history....
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