Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJay Baruchel
IN THE NEWS

Jay Baruchel

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
Where you've seen him American audiences know Jay Baruchel for ensemble roles in such comedies as "Knocked Up" (2007), "Fanboys" (2008) and "Tropic Thunder" (2008); as the cad Tal in "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist" (2008); and leads in TV's "Undeclared" and "Just Legal." He turned in a touching performance in Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby" (2004) as Danger Barch, a kid who really shouldn't be boxing: "Clint Eastwood is the only man I've ever worked for, still, to this day, that, were my granddad still alive, he would have been impressed by. I've worked with awesome people but he would have no idea who Judd Apatow is. My granddad went off to Europe for four years and killed Nazis, so Eastwood's his man."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Honestly, between the twerking controversy and the "Fifty Shades of Grey" casting uproar, sometimes it's a wonder anyone wants to do anything anymore, lest they incur the scornful wrath of the collective consciousness of the Internet. That intersection between man and machine is explicitly explored in the first trailer from the upcoming remake of "Robocop. " Starring Joel Kinnaman in the role played by Peter Weller in the 1987 original, the new film puts a drone-era twist on the original's story of a wounded man encased in a robotic outfit in hopes of becoming the ultimate tool of law enforcement.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
Jay Baruchel is an up-and-comer in a big way -- and has been since around the start of the millennium. Yet even now, with leads in three studio movies and a Canadian indie all coming out within four months of each other, his mind is not blown. "I don't put any stock in this at all because I'm a chronic 'cusper,' " says the lanky, 27-year-old, maple-syrup-bleeding Canadian who still lives in Montreal. He has been in the business for more than a decade and has alternated between supporting parts in big Hollywood films and leads in his homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
A quick glance at recent movie openings might give you the impression that Hollywood has something against humanity, which has been brought to the brink of annihilation in such films as "Oblivion," "After Earth," "Rapture-Palooza" and now "This Is the End. " On the bright side, however, "This Is the End" has something going for it that the other three don't: good reviews. The premise of the film involves a bunch of Hollywood actors playing exaggerated versions of themselves as the apocalypse dawns, and the Los Angeles Times' Betsy Sharkey says it's "stupidly hysterical and smartly heretical.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As funny as an ax to the head, the Canadian comedy "The Trotsky" rolls through its brash, too-clever take on high school outsiderdom — a 17-year-old Montrealite (Jay Baruchel) who believes he's the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky — with a revolutionary's exasperating confidence. In bespectacled, history-emboldened Leon Bronstein's organizing against his capitalist father (Saul Rubinek), aggressively courting an Alexandra (Emily Hampshire) he claims will be his future wife, and leading the charge against fascism at his school, writer-director Jacob Tierney believes he's found the ultimate nerd antihero: a socialist networker.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
American audiences know Jay Baruchel as the nerdy kid from such films as "Knocked Up" and "She's Out of My League. " But with the new hockey comedy "Goon," the Montreal native is making the leap to feature film screenwriter. He and Evan Goldberg ("Superbad") teamed up to pay homage to Canada's national pastime with a movie that's violent on the ice and tenderhearted off — but it is thoroughly, unquestionably Canadian. "We made it for somebody, and we made it for Canadian kids," Baruchel, 29, said in a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Ito
In "How to Train Your Dragon," the 2010 film from DreamWorks Animation, a skinny viking teen named Hiccup discovers that dragons can be taught and tamed, a lot like dogs, except that these dogs are 30 feet across and breathe fire. By the end of the film, vikings and dragons, who began the movie trying to brain each other, are best pals. As with so many other stories of star-crossed, interspecies pairings, from "The Adventures of Milo and Otis" to "Avatar," one wonders just where this relationship will go. That question is answered in the new animated series "Dragons: Riders of Berk," which is being produced by DreamWorks Animation for Cartoon Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2011
SERIES Chase: The marshals are having trouble capturing a criminal with friends and family protecting him, so they enlist a bounty hunter (Eddie Cibrian) in this new episode (8 p.m. NBC). My Cat From Hell: In this new episode cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy works with a man and his feline friend — who takes an instant dislike to his girlfriend (9 p.m. Animal Planet). Saturday Night Live: Ed Helms hosts with musical guest Paul Simon (11:29 p.m. NBC). SPECIALS Nick Cannon: Mr. Showbiz: Calling it a return to his roots, actor, recording artist and music producer Cannon takes to the stage in Las Vegas in this new special (9 p.m. Showtime)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
Quirky, creepy and increasingly involving, the Montreal-set thriller "Good Neighbors" throws a trio of offbeat apartment dwellers together under one shaky roof as a serial killer wreaks havoc around town. It doesn't take long to suspect one of these three young singles may be the elusive criminal — the murderer is unwittingly if inconclusively described early on — but that doesn't detract from the enjoyment of watching the twisty pieces of this often perverse puzzle pile up. Writer-director Jacob Tierney adapted the film, which is more of a "who's-doing-what?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Honestly, between the twerking controversy and the "Fifty Shades of Grey" casting uproar, sometimes it's a wonder anyone wants to do anything anymore, lest they incur the scornful wrath of the collective consciousness of the Internet. That intersection between man and machine is explicitly explored in the first trailer from the upcoming remake of "Robocop. " Starring Joel Kinnaman in the role played by Peter Weller in the 1987 original, the new film puts a drone-era twist on the original's story of a wounded man encased in a robotic outfit in hopes of becoming the ultimate tool of law enforcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Judgment Day comes to Hollywood with a vengeance in "This Is the End. " Jonah Hill is in bed with the devil - in James Franco's mansion. An inferno rages in the front yard, and movie star egos are filleted for fun. When the apocalyptic comedy gets deadly serious about roasting the ethos of celebrity, its satire grows white-hot. As the devil's brigade sets the Hollywood Hills ablaze, "This Is the End" considers many burning questions. Does movie-star cred automatically put one on the A-list of the blessed?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - The music is blaring inside James Franco's house and there's booze - and drugs - everywhere. Actor Michael Cera is snorting lines of cocaine, while comedian Aziz Ansari is trying (and failing) to hook up with Rihanna. Dozens of scantily dressed women mill about in Franco's architecturally sleek crib, which is decorated with artwork made by the actor himself. If the whole bash wasn't unfolding on a soundstage in Louisiana, you might be fooled into thinking it was the real Hollywood Hills deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Ito
In "How to Train Your Dragon," the 2010 film from DreamWorks Animation, a skinny viking teen named Hiccup discovers that dragons can be taught and tamed, a lot like dogs, except that these dogs are 30 feet across and breathe fire. By the end of the film, vikings and dragons, who began the movie trying to brain each other, are best pals. As with so many other stories of star-crossed, interspecies pairings, from "The Adventures of Milo and Otis" to "Avatar," one wonders just where this relationship will go. That question is answered in the new animated series "Dragons: Riders of Berk," which is being produced by DreamWorks Animation for Cartoon Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
First it was the penguins of "Madagascar" and then the animal warriors of "Kung Fu Panda" on Nickelodeon, now it's the cast of DreamWorks' "How to Train Your Dragon" on Cartoon Network. "Dragons: Riders of Berk," which premieres Tuesday, is the latest small-screen incarnation of a successful animated film to retain both the personality and production value of its progenitor. But unlike its predecessors, it plays more like sequel than spinoff. (Although a cinematic sequel is also in the works.)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
American audiences know Jay Baruchel as the nerdy kid from such films as "Knocked Up" and "She's Out of My League. " But with the new hockey comedy "Goon," the Montreal native is making the leap to feature film screenwriter. He and Evan Goldberg ("Superbad") teamed up to pay homage to Canada's national pastime with a movie that's violent on the ice and tenderhearted off — but it is thoroughly, unquestionably Canadian. "We made it for somebody, and we made it for Canadian kids," Baruchel, 29, said in a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
Quirky, creepy and increasingly involving, the Montreal-set thriller "Good Neighbors" throws a trio of offbeat apartment dwellers together under one shaky roof as a serial killer wreaks havoc around town. It doesn't take long to suspect one of these three young singles may be the elusive criminal — the murderer is unwittingly if inconclusively described early on — but that doesn't detract from the enjoyment of watching the twisty pieces of this often perverse puzzle pile up. Writer-director Jacob Tierney adapted the film, which is more of a "who's-doing-what?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | Steven Zeitchik and John Horn and Chris Lee and Rachel Abramowitz
GEMMA ARTERTON ACTRESS Movie fans who enjoyed watching Gemma Arterton tart it up as the dishy Bond girl Strawberry Fields in "Quantum of Solace" last year will get a double serving of the actress in 2010. The 23-year-old stars as an ancient muse in Louis Leterrier's epic "Clash of the Titans" in March before teaming up with Jake Gyllenhaal to stop an evil ruler from destroying the world in May's "Prince of Persia." The British actress may have radiated a sultry vibe as the 007 vixen, but she'll be in full fight mode in these new roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
A quick glance at recent movie openings might give you the impression that Hollywood has something against humanity, which has been brought to the brink of annihilation in such films as "Oblivion," "After Earth," "Rapture-Palooza" and now "This Is the End. " On the bright side, however, "This Is the End" has something going for it that the other three don't: good reviews. The premise of the film involves a bunch of Hollywood actors playing exaggerated versions of themselves as the apocalypse dawns, and the Los Angeles Times' Betsy Sharkey says it's "stupidly hysterical and smartly heretical.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2011
SERIES Chase: The marshals are having trouble capturing a criminal with friends and family protecting him, so they enlist a bounty hunter (Eddie Cibrian) in this new episode (8 p.m. NBC). My Cat From Hell: In this new episode cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy works with a man and his feline friend — who takes an instant dislike to his girlfriend (9 p.m. Animal Planet). Saturday Night Live: Ed Helms hosts with musical guest Paul Simon (11:29 p.m. NBC). SPECIALS Nick Cannon: Mr. Showbiz: Calling it a return to his roots, actor, recording artist and music producer Cannon takes to the stage in Las Vegas in this new special (9 p.m. Showtime)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As funny as an ax to the head, the Canadian comedy "The Trotsky" rolls through its brash, too-clever take on high school outsiderdom — a 17-year-old Montrealite (Jay Baruchel) who believes he's the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky — with a revolutionary's exasperating confidence. In bespectacled, history-emboldened Leon Bronstein's organizing against his capitalist father (Saul Rubinek), aggressively courting an Alexandra (Emily Hampshire) he claims will be his future wife, and leading the charge against fascism at his school, writer-director Jacob Tierney believes he's found the ultimate nerd antihero: a socialist networker.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|