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Jay Chandrasekhar

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2005 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Filmmaker Jay Chandrasekhar, in jeans, a Willie Nelson T-shirt and Birkenstock clogs, is sitting inside the General Lee, the souped-up '69 Charger that became the hillbilly-kitsch icon of "The Dukes of Hazzard" television show, on the Warner Bros. lot in Burbank. As Chandrasekhar absently waits to have his picture taken, one of those studio-tour mini-trams cruises by, and two youngish guys shout out from their seats, "Hey, Super Trooper!" "I absolutely love it!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2005 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Filmmaker Jay Chandrasekhar, in jeans, a Willie Nelson T-shirt and Birkenstock clogs, is sitting inside the General Lee, the souped-up '69 Charger that became the hillbilly-kitsch icon of "The Dukes of Hazzard" television show, on the Warner Bros. lot in Burbank. As Chandrasekhar absently waits to have his picture taken, one of those studio-tour mini-trams cruises by, and two youngish guys shout out from their seats, "Hey, Super Trooper!" "I absolutely love it!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The comedy group Broken Lizard had a modest hit two years ago with its first film, "Super Troopers," about some inept Vermont state troopers who stumble on a drug ring, but if the group strikes gold at the box office with its new picture, "Broken Lizard's Club Dread," it will be more for the seemingly surefire combination of extreme violence and extreme raunch rather than for anything resembling comic inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's nothing super about "Super Troopers" except for those deep into the low end of the frat-house mentality that equates smart-alecky with hilarity. Since that exception could just prove to be pretty sizable at the box office, it's scary to ponder that just when it looked like the "Police Academy" franchise was dead and buried, a bunch of goonish Vermont law enforcement officers might rise up to take their place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
"Beerfest" is one sloppy comedy, but the lads of the troupe Broken Lizard don't know when to say when in their pursuit of the idiotic laugh, and persistence certainly counts for something. The result is the opposite of a microbrew. It's more of a "Half Off All Pitchers!" special. In honor of their late grandfather, played by Donald "Cash the Check" Sutherland, brothers Todd and Jan Wolfhouse travel to Germany to scatter the old man's ashes at Oktoberfest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2008 | Susan King
The irreverent comedy group Broken Lizard ("Super Troopers," "Beerfest") is returning to the big screen. Its latest movie, "The Slammin' Salmon," stars Michael Clarke Duncan as a former heavyweight boxing champ -- think Mike Tyson without the face tattoo -- named Cleon "Slammin' " Salmon. Now a restaurant owner in Miami, Duncan's hot-headed character finds himself in hot water, owing a lot of money to the Yakuza.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | Mark Olsen
If awards-season burnout has resulted in a sudden, overwhelming aversion to classy, high-toned movies, the dumb fun of "Club Dread" may provide an antidote. Make that smart, dumb fun. The latest from the Broken Lizard comedy team concerns an island resort catering to drunk college students where the partying is nonstop hearty until someone starts killing the staff. The troupe's previous effort was the small-town-police comedy "Super Troopers."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
"The Babymakers" starts out as an agreeable, playfully off-color comedy of contemporary domestic manners and loses course to become a slack, tacky slapstick. After months of trying to get his wife Audrey (Olivia Munn) pregnant, Tommy Macklin (Paul Schneider) is told by a doctor that his sperm are "confused. " While reeling from this blow to his masculine identity, he hatches a plan to steal back a batch of semen he had donated to a fertility clinic years before. On their own, just talking at dinner or alone in bed, Schneider and Munn are a winning pair, her high-energy type-A vibe playing well off his low-key delayed responses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"The Dukes of Hazzard" is a film that is not there. It can't really be reviewed because it doesn't really exist. It is not empty calories, which implies pleasure, but simply empty. It's a cosmic void where a movie ought to be. A collection of promotable elements strung together until it's time for the next show, "Dukes" is vapid even by the standards of the venerable TV series about Southern boys and their toys -- rarely confused with "Omnibus" or "Masterpiece Theatre" -- it's based on.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about feast or famine. In the refreshingly sharp romantic comedy "Two Ninas," Ron Livingston's Marty Sachs, who handles stats for the New York Post's sports section, has had no romance for a year, but at last, responding to his best pal's nudging, connects in unexpectedly short order with the beautiful brunet Nina Cohen (Cara Buono) and then the rich and glamorous Nina Harris (Amanda Peet). Like Marty, Nina Cohen has had her share of rotten dating experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2005 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Times Staff Writer
"I think there's a love of infamy and heroism that doesn't play into the zeitgeist," says director Rob Cohen, whose recent $135-million film "Stealth," about a pack of naval aviators chasing a renegade high-tech airplane, just dive-bombed in the marketplace. He's hardly alone, as he points to other A-list directors whose films tanked this year: "You had Ridley Scott with 'Kingdom of Heaven', and Michael Bay ['The Island'] gave you cloning.
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