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Jay Chiat

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MAGAZINE
November 20, 1988
I can accept the fact that 51% of the Sept. 18 issue of the Los Angeles Times Magazine is devoted to advertisements. What I cannot understand is why you would expect any significant number of your 1.4 million readers to be interested enough in Jay Chiat for you to devote almost 20% of an issue to him. PAUL JACOBS Goleta
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NEWS
May 22, 2002
Nice tribute to a distinguished advertiser/business leader ("He Totally Got It," May 9, by Reed Johnson), but the writer failed to credit those before Jay Chiat who undoubtedly influenced him: the founders and practically everyone at Doyle Dane Bernbach in the late '50s and '60s--Carl Ally, Jack Tinker, Mary Wells Lawrence--as well as West Coast-style originators such as Carson Roberts, the L.A. office of Doyle Dane, and the whole creative revolution in...
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Chiat, the ad man who co-founded the largest and most successful agency in Los Angeles, began to relinquish the reins of his fast-growing advertising empire on Friday. Chiat stepped down as chairman and chief executive of North American operations at Chiat/Day/Mojo and handed that title to Bob Wolf, 47, who has been president of the firm's Venice-based operations for about two years.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're glad you're not an Oscar Mayer wiener, you may have Jay Chiat partly to thank. If you can pass by the Charmin on the rack at your local supermarket without reflexively picturing Mr. Whipple plunging his obsessive-compulsive fingers into mounds of toilet tissue, say a quick prayer of gratitude for Chiat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2002 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Chiat, the advertising executive whose firm created the drum-beating Energizer bunny and introduced Apple as the "computer for the rest of us," died of prostate cancer early Tuesday at his Venice beach home. He was 70. Chiat was credited with making Los Angeles an advertising powerhouse in the 1980s and 1990s with a new "West Coast style" of subtle logos and strong messages.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're glad you're not an Oscar Mayer wiener, you may have Jay Chiat partly to thank. If you can pass by the Charmin on the rack at your local supermarket without reflexively picturing Mr. Whipple plunging his obsessive-compulsive fingers into mounds of toilet tissue, say a quick prayer of gratitude for Chiat.
MAGAZINE
September 18, 1988 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a Los Angeles writer.
THE NIKE BILLBOARDS ARE nearly ancient history now, measured by the attention span of the advertising business, a business dedicated to divining what consumers are thinking and feeling and projecting about themselves in the ever-present.
NEWS
March 31, 1988
A $100,000 pledge to a new endowed scholarship at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena has been made by Jay Chiat, chief executive officer of Chiat/Day. The scholarship will be named for Lee Clow, Chiat/Day's president.
NEWS
May 22, 2002
Nice tribute to a distinguished advertiser/business leader ("He Totally Got It," May 9, by Reed Johnson), but the writer failed to credit those before Jay Chiat who undoubtedly influenced him: the founders and practically everyone at Doyle Dane Bernbach in the late '50s and '60s--Carl Ally, Jack Tinker, Mary Wells Lawrence--as well as West Coast-style originators such as Carson Roberts, the L.A. office of Doyle Dane, and the whole creative revolution in...
BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Jay Chiat, chief executive of the ad firm Chiat/Day, will no longer be running the agency's New York office. On Tuesday, Chiat named Jane Newman, who had been executive vice president and general manager of the agency's New York office, as president and chief executive of the New York operation. The office posts annual billings of $150 million. Newman, 40, was named general manager last year. Chiat said Newman's promotion was overdue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2002 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Chiat, the advertising executive whose firm created the drum-beating Energizer bunny and introduced Apple as the "computer for the rest of us," died of prostate cancer early Tuesday at his Venice beach home. He was 70. Chiat was credited with making Los Angeles an advertising powerhouse in the 1980s and 1990s with a new "West Coast style" of subtle logos and strong messages.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Advertising guru Jay Chiat now spends his days in a funky but somewhat grungy loft building on the far west side of Manhattan, talking up the new revolution. And he isn't referring to advertising. The former chairman and chief executive of the Chiat/Day ad agency has switched gears to become part of the "e-generation," serving as interim head of Screaming Media, a start-up that provides syndicated content to Web companies.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York advertising agency Omnicom said Thursday that it has completed the previously announced merger of Los Angeles-based Chiat/Day into the Omnicom unit TBWA of New York. As expected, Bill Tragos, chairman and chief executive of TBWA, was named chairman and chief executive of the merged agency.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the "Ad Agency of the Decade" flinching? Is it in trouble? Or is it just being its ornery self? Chiat/Day, the Venice ad firm Advertising Age called the "Agency of the Decade" three years ago, ran national newspaper ads Monday that tried to put the best light on some very bad news: It was fired last week by client Reebok for the second time in five years. The headline to its unusual newspaper ad said, "Now we know how Dan felt."
BUSINESS
November 19, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ad agency Chiat/Day/Mojo announced Wednesday that it will sell its operations in Australia and New Zealand. Analysts say the move signals the unraveling of Los Angeles ad man Jay Chiat's vision of an international advertising empire. The price of the sale to giant Chicago agency Foote, Cone & Belding Communications was not revealed.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woes that have gripped the advertising industry for months have finally grabbed hold at Chiat/Day/Mojo. The largest advertising agency in Southern California has laid off at least 50 employees nationwide in recent weeks. This week, the agency fired 30 from its New York office and six from its headquarters in Venice. Last month, 15 employees from its worldwide corporate finance department, also in Venice, were handed walking papers.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
No one at the ad firm Chiat/Day has much of an office--except Jay Chiat. But even the Los Angeles agency's millionaire chairman often spurns his office to go sit out in one of the agency's dozens of tiny cubicles with no doors. The purpose is to encourage creative bantering. Last week, one of the world's biggest auto makers, Nissan, made a $150-million bet that some big ideas will flow out of these small cubicles.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
California's image as a pacesetter held up fairly well in the 1980s in the world of business and economics. Californians were a force for dramatic change. Some achieved change on a grand scale--inspiring a revolution in economic policy or transforming corporate finance. Some of the change may seem minor, but it altered our daily routines and our life styles.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Chiat, the ad man who co-founded the largest and most successful agency in Los Angeles, began to relinquish the reins of his fast-growing advertising empire on Friday. Chiat stepped down as chairman and chief executive of North American operations at Chiat/Day/Mojo and handed that title to Bob Wolf, 47, who has been president of the firm's Venice-based operations for about two years.
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