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Jay Cohen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be tempting to say Jay Cohen has performed that signature bugle call countless times. But the fact is, Cohen has kept count during nearly a decade as the hornblower at Los Angeles-area racetracks. By his figuring, when Cohen raised the coach horn to his lips to herald the fourth race at Santa Anita Park on Wednesday, it was the 40,000th time he has sounded the fanfare that is horse racing's equivalent of "Gentlemen, start your engines!"
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BUSINESS
May 12, 2009 | Alex Pham
Jerry Bruckheimer, the producer of action films and television shows such as "Top Gun," "Black Hawk Down" and "C.S.I," now thinks video games are where the action is. Bruckheimer is the latest Hollywood kingpin to dive into the $50-billion-and-growing global game industry.
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MAGAZINE
February 15, 2004 | Fred Dickey, Fred Dickey last wrote for the magazine about illegal immigrant labor.
Jay Cohen believes he knows what went wrong in Michael Hope's life. Hope, 56, sits in his home in the San Gabriel Valley and tries to use his brain, an effort of tortuous frustration for a former quick-thinking business executive. Not only does he suffer from constant muscle pain throughout his body, but also from the anguish of short-term memory loss and the inability to command words in simple conversation.
MAGAZINE
February 15, 2004 | Fred Dickey, Fred Dickey last wrote for the magazine about illegal immigrant labor.
Jay Cohen believes he knows what went wrong in Michael Hope's life. Hope, 56, sits in his home in the San Gabriel Valley and tries to use his brain, an effort of tortuous frustration for a former quick-thinking business executive. Not only does he suffer from constant muscle pain throughout his body, but also from the anguish of short-term memory loss and the inability to command words in simple conversation.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2009 | Alex Pham
Jerry Bruckheimer, the producer of action films and television shows such as "Top Gun," "Black Hawk Down" and "C.S.I," now thinks video games are where the action is. Bruckheimer is the latest Hollywood kingpin to dive into the $50-billion-and-growing global game industry.
HEALTH
November 26, 2001 | Linda Marsa
Side effects--or "adverse reactions"--from prescription medications kill more than 100,000 Americans--more than AIDS, alcohol, infectious diseases or auto accidents--and seriously injure 2 million others every year. Jay S. Cohen, a professor of medicine at UC San Diego, has written an eye-opening look at how drugs are developed in the United States, and a useful guide on how the average consumer can avoid becoming another statistic.
NEWS
August 14, 1987
A former leader and two members of the Jewish Defense League pleaded guilty in New York to racketeering charges that they used the organization to carry out bombings, extortion and fraud. Former JDL national chairman Victor Vancier, 30, and associates Jay Cohen, 23, and Murray Young, 59, each face up to 20 years in prison and $25,000 in fines. A fourth member pleaded guilty to aiding a tear-gas attack that disrupted the performance of a Soviet dance troupe in New York.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of those memorable nuptial moments: "Susan," said Richard Casselberry, facing his bride, "take this ring as a sign of my love and fidelity in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. . . . Father, I am going to pass out." The bride tried to catch the groom, but the dead weight was too much. "Help me!" she cried, and the best man came to the rescue. Five minutes later, after a glass of water and some fresh air, the revivified groom returned.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2000 | Bloomberg News
A Woodmere, N.Y., man was convicted of operating an Antigua-based sports betting parlor that accepted bets over the Internet. Jay Cohen was the first defendant to stand trial in New York in a series of offshore Internet sports gambling cases brought under a federal law that makes it a crime to use phone lines to place bets. Ten other defendants have pleaded guilty. Prosecutors said Cohen, also of San Francisco, served as president of World Sports Exchange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1998 | YUNG KIM
A Corona del Mar hypnotist was released on bail Tuesday after being arrested on allegations of sexual assault on a patient during therapy sessions, police said. Jay Cohen, 48, who conducted so-called hypnotic therapy at his home in the 500 block of Acacia Street, was arrested Thursday by Newport Beach detectives for allegedly assaulting a patient from September to November last year, police said.
HEALTH
November 26, 2001 | Linda Marsa
Side effects--or "adverse reactions"--from prescription medications kill more than 100,000 Americans--more than AIDS, alcohol, infectious diseases or auto accidents--and seriously injure 2 million others every year. Jay S. Cohen, a professor of medicine at UC San Diego, has written an eye-opening look at how drugs are developed in the United States, and a useful guide on how the average consumer can avoid becoming another statistic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be tempting to say Jay Cohen has performed that signature bugle call countless times. But the fact is, Cohen has kept count during nearly a decade as the hornblower at Los Angeles-area racetracks. By his figuring, when Cohen raised the coach horn to his lips to herald the fourth race at Santa Anita Park on Wednesday, it was the 40,000th time he has sounded the fanfare that is horse racing's equivalent of "Gentlemen, start your engines!"
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fremont General Corp. of Santa Monica, one of the nation's largest workers' compensation insurers, said Monday that it will buy San Francisco-based Industrial Indemnity Holdings from Talegen Holdings Inc., a Xerox Corp. subsidiary, for $444 million in cash and assumed debt. James A. McIntyre, chairman and chief executive of Fremont General, said the purchase of Industrial Indemnity will broaden his company's reach, which had been concentrated in California and Illinois.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Allstate Corp., the second-largest home and car insurer in the U.S., said Tuesday that it has bought auto repair company Sterling Collision Centers Inc. to make car repairs and the processing of insurance claims more efficient. Terms weren't disclosed. Allstate and other auto and home insurers are facing rising claims at a time when competition makes it hard to raise prices. Analysts say many companies are trying to reduce costs by teaming up with preferred car repair services.
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