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Jay Curtis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to enliven the Los Angeles County assessor's race, a challenger to Assessor John Lynch on Monday said that property tax records are so full of errors--including use of a postal zone code discontinued 20 years ago--that local government has lost millions of dollars in revenues.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County assessor candidate Jay Curtis last week stood on a lonely Hollywood street corner preparing to announce a plan to rewrite a section of Proposition 13 that allows different taxes to be levied on similar properties. Curtis carefully chose a site only a few blocks from TV stations, with a good visual backdrop of similar houses that have different tax rates. But no one showed up. Even a dog running loose in the neighborhood ignored the event.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of today's filing deadline, a lively race is shaping up for the low-profile job of Los Angeles County assessor with incumbent John Lynch drawing six challengers, including his former secretary, the head of a taxpayers group and an assessor's employee named Kenneth P. Hahn. Hahn, the candidate, is no relation to veteran Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, who has endorsed Lynch. Jay Curtis, president of the 350-member Los Angeles Taxpayers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to enliven the Los Angeles County assessor's race, a challenger to Assessor John Lynch on Monday said that property tax records are so full of errors--including use of a postal zone code discontinued 20 years ago--that local government has lost millions of dollars in revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County assessor candidate Jay Curtis last week stood on a lonely Hollywood street corner preparing to announce a plan to rewrite a section of Proposition 13 that allows different taxes to be levied on similar properties. Curtis carefully chose a site only a few blocks from TV stations, with a good visual backdrop of similar houses that have different tax rates. But no one showed up. Even a dog running loose in the neighborhood ignored the event.
NEWS
April 9, 1994
Calling Gov. Pete Wilson "the last line of defense for California's taxpayers," the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. endorsed Wilson's reelection bid Friday. "If you care about the way government handles your money, then you want Pete Wilson as your governor," Joel Fox, president of the watchdog organization, said at a news conference. Fox was joined by Jay Curtis, president of the Los Angeles Taxpayers Assn., which also endorsed Wilson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
City officials must require a developer to stabilize a hillside that partially collapsed in 1998 during El Nino storms, severely damaging or threatening five homes, a judge has ruled. SunCal Cos. of Anaheim helped cause the collapse while grading for the Pacific Point project, Orange County Superior Court Judge William F. McDonald ruled in a lawsuit that homeowners filed in May 2001 against the city and the developer of the 256-acre project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990
In its editorial about Prop. 130 ("Conservation at Its Very Best," Oct. 9), The Times left out an important part of the story: Prop. 130 will cost taxpayers $1.3 billion. That's billion with a capital B. Proponents of 130 seem to think that bonds are free money. In fact, bonds are the most expensive way to finance government. For every dollar in bonds issued, taxpayers pay almost another dollar in interest. There are just two ways to pay for this $1.3 billion: a tax increase or a reduction of vital services such as education, health care and law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2002 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Juan Capistrano officials must require a developer to stabilize a hillside that partially collapsed in 1998 during El Nino storms, damaging or threatening five homes, a judge has ruled. SunCal Cos. of Anaheim contributed to the collapse while grading for the Pacific Point project, Orange County Superior Court Judge William F. McDonald ruled last week in a lawsuit homeowners filed in May 2001 against the city and the developer of the 256-acre project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
Proposition 13, passed in 1978, has made most decisions on taxing real property virtually automatic, with reappraisals limited to new construction and changes of ownership. One result has been to place even more emphasis than before on skilled and efficient administration in the field of tax assessment. The Los Angeles County assessor's office oversees the nation's biggest single property-taxing jurisdiction, annually determining the tax bill for 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of today's filing deadline, a lively race is shaping up for the low-profile job of Los Angeles County assessor with incumbent John Lynch drawing six challengers, including his former secretary, the head of a taxpayers group and an assessor's employee named Kenneth P. Hahn. Hahn, the candidate, is no relation to veteran Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, who has endorsed Lynch. Jay Curtis, president of the 350-member Los Angeles Taxpayers Assn.
OPINION
November 1, 1992
Jay Curtis, in urging voters to reject Measures M and N ("Cut the Frills to Hire Police," Commentary, Oct. 29), argued that the percentage of the city's budget that goes to police is smaller today than it was the year after Prop. 13 cut property taxes. That is simply not true! An accurate comparison of police expenditures for fiscal years 1992-93 and 1978-79 (when Prop. 13 went into effect) requires that we include not just police salaries for those years, but also police pensions, health insurance for Police Department employees, and other related costs.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hillside beneath an exclusive subdivision collapsed Thursday, forcing three families to evacuate, swallowing several backyards and destroying patios and a swimming pool. There were no injuries or damage to houses from the landslide, which occurred before 8 a.m. in the Meredith Canyon development of this south Orange County community. Resident John Jay Curtis said he awoke to tremors.
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