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Jay Farrar

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As cult heroes go, singer-songwriter Jay Farrar is pretty reliable. During his Knitting Factory performance Saturday, his current work proved cut from the same moody, bucolic cloth as the pioneering alt-country material he crafted with high school pal Jeff Tweedy in Uncle Tupelo and later as the leader of Son Volt. With Son Volt on indefinite hiatus, Farrar released his solo debut, "Sebastopol," last fall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | Mikael Wood
"We're a new band as of a few hours ago," Jay Farrar announced Thursday night from the stage of Largo at the Coronet, and he wasn't kidding: Thursday's show, the first of two in L.A., marked the premiere public performance by the Son Volt frontman with Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie. The songwriters, who were also scheduled to play the El Rey Friday night, met in San Francisco in 2007 to record music for the soundtrack of "One Fast Move or I'm Gone," a documentary film about Jack Kerouac's novel "Big Sur."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | Mikael Wood
"We're a new band as of a few hours ago," Jay Farrar announced Thursday night from the stage of Largo at the Coronet, and he wasn't kidding: Thursday's show, the first of two in L.A., marked the premiere public performance by the Son Volt frontman with Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie. The songwriters, who were also scheduled to play the El Rey Friday night, met in San Francisco in 2007 to record music for the soundtrack of "One Fast Move or I'm Gone," a documentary film about Jack Kerouac's novel "Big Sur."
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
How can one musician have a reunion? What sounds like a Zen koan actually is the question alt-country rocker Jay Farrar had to answer in coming up with a new record by his old band, Son Volt. The St. Louis-based musician was all set to reconvene Son Volt, which went on indefinite hiatus nearly five years ago, when the group reunited last year long enough to record a song for the Alejandro Escovedo benefit album, "Por Vida."
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
How can one musician have a reunion? What sounds like a Zen koan actually is the question alt-country rocker Jay Farrar had to answer in coming up with a new record by his old band, Son Volt. The St. Louis-based musician was all set to reconvene Son Volt, which went on indefinite hiatus nearly five years ago, when the group reunited last year long enough to record a song for the Alejandro Escovedo benefit album, "Por Vida."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to kick military training programs off the Cal State Northridge campus appeared to have widespread support among faculty members Thursday, but when the issue was to be voted on the Faculty Senate did not have a quorum. If the Reserve Officer Training Corps is ousted from CSUN at the senate's March meeting, it would be the first time the program has been barred from an American college campus since the Vietnam War.
BOOKS
November 11, 2001 | THOMAS LYNCH, Thomas Lynch is a poet and essayist. His most recent books are "The Undertaking," "Still Life in Milford" and "Bodies in Motion and at Rest."
There are books that come along at just the right time. In a world that has become so sad, too savage, more somber than a species ought to inhabit without relief, the appearance of "Jay's Journal of Anomalies" offers the wary and heartbroken and deeply vexed rest, if only momentarily, from the terrible news of the day. These are divertimenti, crafted by a master and perfectly pitched in luxuriant bombast. "Superlatives arrest our attention.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | Richard Cromelin
With Uncle Tupelo and Son Volt anchoring his resume, Jay Farrar is one of the cornerstones of the roots-conscious alt-country genre. As he hits the road with a set focusing on his latest album, "Terroir Blues," the singer-songwriter will be backed by the Washington, D.C., band Canyon, which also opens the show. * The Troubadour 9081 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood Today, 8 p.m. $15 (310) 276-6168
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1998 | MARC WEINGARTEN
*** 1/2 Son Volt, "Wide Swing Tremolo," Warner Bros. Son Volt's Jay Farrar is one of alternative country's big thinkers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As cult heroes go, singer-songwriter Jay Farrar is pretty reliable. During his Knitting Factory performance Saturday, his current work proved cut from the same moody, bucolic cloth as the pioneering alt-country material he crafted with high school pal Jeff Tweedy in Uncle Tupelo and later as the leader of Son Volt. With Son Volt on indefinite hiatus, Farrar released his solo debut, "Sebastopol," last fall.
BOOKS
November 11, 2001 | THOMAS LYNCH, Thomas Lynch is a poet and essayist. His most recent books are "The Undertaking," "Still Life in Milford" and "Bodies in Motion and at Rest."
There are books that come along at just the right time. In a world that has become so sad, too savage, more somber than a species ought to inhabit without relief, the appearance of "Jay's Journal of Anomalies" offers the wary and heartbroken and deeply vexed rest, if only momentarily, from the terrible news of the day. These are divertimenti, crafted by a master and perfectly pitched in luxuriant bombast. "Superlatives arrest our attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | SARA SCRIBNER
Son Volt, one of the landmark bands of the "alternative country" movement, showed off its unique take on post-punk country Tuesday at the El Rey Theatre, delivering a low-key, no-attitude set that reveled in an impressively taut rootsiness. Rumpled lead singer and guitarist Jay Farrar delved right into the songs from the band's second record, "Straightaways."
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