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Jay Garner

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NEWS
April 15, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
A swift war has handed Jay Garner, the retired American general charged with rebuilding Iraq, a rare and daunting opportunity: to create a new state -- from government ministries and police forces to money and TV stations. It is a race against the clock, Garner acknowledges, against the forces of anarchy that are sapping Iraq and the growing resentment toward Americans who rid the nation of Saddam Hussein but left nothing, so far, in his place.
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NEWS
April 22, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The retired American army general charged with managing postwar Iraq arrived in Baghdad for the first time Monday, touring a battered and fragmenting city that craves U.S. help but dreads U.S. domination. Accompanied by heavily armed soldiers, Lt. Gen. Jay Garner arrived to officially assume his role as administrator of Iraq, heading an ambitious and costly U.S. plan to rebuild the country's infrastructure, reshape its government and overhaul its economic, educational and political systems.
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NEWS
April 22, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The retired American army general charged with managing postwar Iraq arrived in Baghdad for the first time Monday, touring a battered and fragmenting city that craves U.S. help but dreads U.S. domination. Accompanied by heavily armed soldiers, Lt. Gen. Jay Garner arrived to officially assume his role as administrator of Iraq, heading an ambitious and costly U.S. plan to rebuild the country's infrastructure, reshape its government and overhaul its economic, educational and political systems.
NEWS
April 15, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
A swift war has handed Jay Garner, the retired American general charged with rebuilding Iraq, a rare and daunting opportunity: to create a new state -- from government ministries and police forces to money and TV stations. It is a race against the clock, Garner acknowledges, against the forces of anarchy that are sapping Iraq and the growing resentment toward Americans who rid the nation of Saddam Hussein but left nothing, so far, in his place.
NEWS
May 10, 2003 | Josh Getlin and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
As the 5 p.m. deadline approached in a small, crowded newsroom, reporters and editors raced to finish stories for their nightly broadcast. Perched on a wall above them, a battery of television screens flashed dramatically different images of the U.S. military role in postwar Iraq. On one monitor, the Hezbollah-funded Al Manar TV channel beamed grisly pictures of bombing damage in Baghdad.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | From Reuters
The main Iraqi Shiite opposition group said Wednesday that it would boycott a political meeting the United States is trying to arrange in southern Iraq next week because of the U.S. military presence. "We are not going to take part in this meeting in Nasiriyah. We think this is part of Gen. [Jay] Garner's rule of Iraq and we are not going to be part of that project at all," said Hamid Bayati, the London representative of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
The new American civilian administrator of Iraq, L. Paul Bremer III, arrived today to take over the task of piecing this country back together and setting it on a democratic course. Bremer arrived in this southern city with Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the man Bremer replaced as the senior American civilian in Iraq, retired Army Lt. Gen. Jay Garner. The three men met in Qatar on Sunday and flew together to Kuwait that evening.
OPINION
April 9, 2003
Re "U.S. Fumbling Postwar Plan," Commentary, April 4: Hussein Ibish brings up points that should concern every American, because although the war is proving a little harder and longer than the Bush administration anticipated, there's no limit to how hard and long-lasting the "peace" could be. Putting retired Lt. Gen. Jay Garner, an avowed supporter of the Israeli hard right, in charge of the occupation will increase Arab rage across the region, jeopardizing...
NEWS
May 2, 2003 | From Reuters
A representative from the Iran-based Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq said Thursday that a senior official of the party, Abdelaziz Hakim, had met with U.S. envoy Zalmay Khalilzad and U.S. postwar administrator Jay Garner at the party's new Baghdad offices. "They discussed three things: security, restoring public services and setting up an interim government," Mohsen Hakim said.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Patriot missile, a star of the Persian Gulf War that since has been tarnished by criticism, may have destroyed only one of the 90 Scud missiles Iraq fired at Saudi Arabia and Israel, experts told Congress Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Have you ever wondered why Carol Channing is still doing "Hello, Dolly!" after more than 4,500 performances, at 74 years of age? You need only see her face when the applause comes rolling over the footlights, and you will understand. Applause is mother's milk to Channing. No, it's oxygen. It's air . You have only until Sunday to see her, and the show, at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. "Hello, Dolly!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2007 | Susan King
Charles Ferguson, the writer-director of "No End in Sight," a documentary about America's involvement in Iraq, initially was "sympathetic" to the idea of using military force to push Saddam Hussein from power. "I thought if it was done competently, with a large international coalition and a lot of U.N. involvement, it would bring good things," says Ferguson, who has been a visiting scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UC Berkeley.
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