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Jay Gorney

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NEWS
June 15, 1990
Jay Gorney, whose "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" became the musical motif of the Great Depression, died Thursday at the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged in New York City. A spokesman for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, to which Gorney had belonged since 1925, said the song maker was 93 when he died of Parkinson's disease.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009
Susan King's article regarding the Great Depression, movies and remakes was enlightening ["Hey Brother Can You Spare a Remake?" March 15]. The title was probably tied to the 1932 E.Y. Harburg and Jay Gorney song "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?" Some of the lines in the song, even though the composer's thoughts go back 77 years, can still relate to the current depressed economy and forlorn mood. One such line relating to building a railroad and making it run might relate to the current problems with Metrolink.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009
Susan King's article regarding the Great Depression, movies and remakes was enlightening ["Hey Brother Can You Spare a Remake?" March 15]. The title was probably tied to the 1932 E.Y. Harburg and Jay Gorney song "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?" Some of the lines in the song, even though the composer's thoughts go back 77 years, can still relate to the current depressed economy and forlorn mood. One such line relating to building a railroad and making it run might relate to the current problems with Metrolink.
NEWS
June 15, 1990
Jay Gorney, whose "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" became the musical motif of the Great Depression, died Thursday at the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged in New York City. A spokesman for the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, to which Gorney had belonged since 1925, said the song maker was 93 when he died of Parkinson's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1990 | From Stacy Jenel Smith
When "Saturday Night Fever" became a 1977 box-office smash, launching the disco craze, leading lady Karen Lynn Gorney was hailed by some as "an instant movie star." So what happened? "People didn't know what to do with Stephanie Mangano," says Gorney, who felt typecast as the movie's tough-on-the-outside, soft-on-the-inside Brooklyn secretary. "I think that what happened is that I was so vulnerable and scared, whatever people projected on me, I became.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
"What a thrill!" Joni Mitchell declared Friday at the Greek Theatre, referring to the chance to sing live with a 70-piece orchestra--and the reaction of her fans was surely mutual. Starting a brief U.S. tour, Mitchell gave a two-hour performance that was both classy and revealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The woes of St. Petersburg's venerable Hermitage Museum are not a Russian state secret. Ever since the mid-1980s when glasnost and perestroika opened the former Soviet Union's doors to Western reporters and loosened the lips of the museum's staff, press reports have sounded alarms about crumbling plaster, peeling paint, faulty plumbing and inadequate security--all of which endanger one of the world's greatest art collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1992 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Walt Disney Productions and Hieronymus Bosch collaborated on a painting, it might look like one of Alexis Rockman's 19 stunning watercolors at Thomas Solomon's Garage. From Disney, the New York-based artist has taken the illusory stop-action suspension of single animation cels, and the more-beautiful-than-life intensity of computer-assisted color saturation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Getting noticed is the goal of any artist, and in a high-profile and always diverse group show like the Whitney Biennial, it isn't easy. Thinking big helps, and grabbing visitors early doesn't hurt either, so Martin Kersels' in-your-face sound piece right at the entrance to the museum should hit its mark.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"I've avoided seeing this work installed all together like this because it's sort of overwhelming for me," says Tim Rollins of "Amerika I--XII," a series of sprawling collaborative paintings conceived and executed by Rollins and K.O.S. (Kids of Survival), an art collective of learning-disabled students from the South Bronx. "It makes me feel hurt and happy at the same time."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
Artist Allen Ruppersberg once described himself as a cultural flaneur. A French word that refers to a wanderer who strolls the boulevard examining the urban world at a leisurely pace, the term is a perfect fit for Ruppersberg.
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