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Jay Greenberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
I try not to be shocked by the depths to which the music business can sink. And I fail. Remember David Helfgott, the mentally unstable Australian pianist? His handlers literally pushed him onto the stage and suckered a large classically clueless audience into feeling deep sympathy for this poor, lovable, deer-caught-in-the-headlights soul.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
I try not to be shocked by the depths to which the music business can sink. And I fail. Remember David Helfgott, the mentally unstable Australian pianist? His handlers literally pushed him onto the stage and suckered a large classically clueless audience into feeling deep sympathy for this poor, lovable, deer-caught-in-the-headlights soul.
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SPORTS
September 11, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
Not everyone in Australia is consumed by the Olympics. The citizens of Walhalla--population 21--have declared their old gold-mining town an "Olympics-Free Zone." Visitors overheard gossiping about track times, sailing conditions, sports injuries or doping scandals will be fined on the spot. Unpatriotic? Not at all, said Rhonda Acquilina, who with husband Norm runs Walhalla's only general store in the outback town of western Victoria. "We're offering a haven for people who have had enough."
SPORTS
July 19, 2001 | Earl Gustkey
With indications that more Japanese baseball players may be on their way to the USA--published reports have Kazuo Matsui considering the jump after 2002--Bill Conlin of the Philadelphia Daily News wonders if Japan may go the way of the Dominican Republic. "When I'm king of the World--the trans-Pacific exodus of Japanese talent to the U.S. will begin in earnest when major league scouts begin signing amateur Japanese players out of high school and college," Conlin wrote.
SPORTS
September 20, 2002 | Mal Florence
Nick Canepa in the San Diego Union-Tribune commenting on Charger linebacker Junior Seau: "At 33 ... he remains the hunter. The attacker. Animated. Relentless. Vigilant. Smarter. More in control of his risks, but still fiercely independent. Still the leader of the band, acting as if every battle could be his last.... "If there is no letup in Seau on the field, there is no letup in him off it.... He practices like a demon. Arrives early and stays late. And why is that? Fear.
SPORTS
October 20, 1999 | SHAV GLICK
Robin Ventura, who lost a grand slam when his New York Met teammates swarmed onto the field after his hit had beaten the Atlanta Braves on Sunday, isn't the first player to lose a home run in a dramatic game. With Felix Mantilla on second and Henry Aaron on first in the 13th inning of a scoreless tie in 1959, Joe Adcock of the Milwaukee Braves hit the ball out of the park off Pittsburgh Pirate pitcher Harvey Haddix, breaking up a no-hitter (Haddix had a perfect game for 12 innings).
SPORTS
May 18, 1991 | JERRY CROWE
If it wasn't true, Tom Lasorda wouldn't repeat it: According to the Dodger manager, while playing for a team in a Cuban winter league in the early 1950s, he had a locker next to pitcher Terry McDuffy's. McDuffy was approached before a game one day by Manager Adolph Luque, described by Lasorda as "the meanest . . . I ever played for." When Luque told McDuffy he would be pitching on two days' rest, McDuffy balked, telling his manager, "I'm going home" and beginning to pack his equipment.
SPORTS
May 26, 1996 | MAL FLORENCE
Michael Wilbon in the Washington Post on the controversy caused by Baltimore Oriole Manager Davey Johnson asking Cal Ripken Jr. to move from shortstop to third base: "Can you imagine the nerve, asking someone universally agreed upon as being the consummate ballplayer to help his team by playing another position? I'm familiar with the phrase 'fixture at the position,' but this is ridiculous. "All this hand-wringing is making me nauseous.
SPORTS
February 9, 1997 | MAL FLORENCE
Ed O'Bannon, who led UCLA to the NCAA basketball championship in 1995, apparently has found his niche with the New Jersey Nets. Last year was a disillusioning one for O'Bannon, who had considerably more bench time than playing time. "I was really starting to feel that I didn't belong in this league," O'Bannon told the New York Times. "I was thinking my senior year in college was all a fluke."
SPORTS
November 15, 2002 | Mal Florence
Gary Shelton of the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times, on the competition for the Heisman Trophy: "If nothing else, the college football season has proven this: No one deserves this year's Heisman. "No one. There is no best college football player in the country. There is only a 500-way tie for second." We wonder if Shelton is aware of the impressive statistics compiled by USC quarterback Carson Palmer. It's a school on the West Coast, Gary.
SPORTS
June 17, 1998 | MAL FLORENCE
Thomas Boswell in the Washington Post: "For the past 25 years, from the World Cup to pro soccer in both America and Europe, right through the NCAA and high school versions of the sport. I've given soccer every chance. Time's up. "Soccer is a good game. . . . Or, to be more precise, it's a good game considering it's a sport in which the most gifted part of the human body--the hands--can't be used. . . . "Soccer seems not to have noted the evolution of opposable thumbs.
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