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Jay Gummerman

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NEWS
April 8, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
As a graduate student in UC Irvine's Program in Writing, Jay Gummerman was encouraged by some to write a novel rather than short stories. Publishers, conventional wisdom has it, are not particularly interested in story collections. And it's especially difficult to sell a collection of stories that have never appeared in print elsewhere, either in popular magazines or literary quarterlies. The San Clemente short story writer has proved conventional wisdom wrong. Gummerman's collection of 10 such stories, "We Find Ourselves in Moontown," has just been published by Knopf ($16.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a short-story writer, Jay Gummerman neverknowswhereinspirationwillturnup. With "Chez Chance," his first novel, it was hearing about a young Orange County phone company tree trimmer who was paralyzed in a fall from a palm tree after being startled by a rat. "It was something that when I heard it, I thought, 'That's a really horrible thing,' " says Gummerman, 38, of San Clemente. "Later on, it kind of percolated up to my writer's consciousness."
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BOOKS
December 24, 1995 | Dave Shulman, Dave Shulman is a regular contributor to the LA Weekly
In this subtly warped tale of Disneyland-adjacent drug peddling and real-estate swindling, Jay Gummerman not only presents the most appetizing analysis of the horrors of Disney-fication since Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart's "How to Read Donald Duck," but offers substantial allegorical evidence that, despite their annoying tendency to thrash one's brain to oblivion, hallucinogens are ultimately less damaging to society's consciousness than their chemical-free counterpart, the Wonderful
BOOKS
December 24, 1995 | Dave Shulman, Dave Shulman is a regular contributor to the LA Weekly
In this subtly warped tale of Disneyland-adjacent drug peddling and real-estate swindling, Jay Gummerman not only presents the most appetizing analysis of the horrors of Disney-fication since Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart's "How to Read Donald Duck," but offers substantial allegorical evidence that, despite their annoying tendency to thrash one's brain to oblivion, hallucinogens are ultimately less damaging to society's consciousness than their chemical-free counterpart, the Wonderful
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a short-story writer, Jay Gummerman never knows where inspiration will turn up. With "Chez Chance," his first novel, it was hearing about a young Orange County phone company tree trimmer who was paralyzed in a fall from a palm tree after being startled by a rat. "It was something that when I heard it, I thought, 'That's a really horrible thing,' " says Gummerman, 38, of San Clemente. "Later on, it kind of percolated up to my writer's consciousness."
BOOKS
May 28, 1989
WE FIND OURSELVES IN MOONTOWN by Jay Gummerman (Alfred A. Knopf: $16.95; 175 pp.) "Anyone who lives in California and yearns to find good new writers will fall upon this book with glad cries . . . because of (Gummerman's) uncanny management of dialogue and the luminous texture of lives that the rest of us barely give a thought to."--Carolyn See AMERICAN GENESIS A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm by Thomas P. Hughes (Viking: $24.95; 349 pp.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1987
Robert Hilburn's review ("Icons of the '60s Paired on Tour," July 13) showcases his ignorance of the Grateful Dead's music and fans once again. First of all, he implies that because the Deadheads sang along with every song during the band's opening set, the Dead must have been playing their "greatest hits." What bunk! If the fans sing along on every song, maybe it's because they know every song. I'm sure this must not seem possible to Hilburn, who obviously views Deadheads as one huge acid casualty.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early reviews of Michelle Latiolais' first novel, "Even Now," praise it for being "delicate" and "lyrically evocative" (Kirkus Reviews) as it probes "a common theme with new depth and without dreariness" (Booklist). But a mixed review in Publishers Weekly also describes the Costa Mesa writer's sensitively written novel about the struggles of a Northern California girl caught between her divorced parents as "slow-moving."
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a short-story writer, Jay Gummerman neverknowswhereinspirationwillturnup. With "Chez Chance," his first novel, it was hearing about a young Orange County phone company tree trimmer who was paralyzed in a fall from a palm tree after being startled by a rat. "It was something that when I heard it, I thought, 'That's a really horrible thing,' " says Gummerman, 38, of San Clemente. "Later on, it kind of percolated up to my writer's consciousness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992
The city is considering a proposal to redevlop the 52-year-old Beachcomber Motel and neighboring Robison home into a luxury resort hotel for the Pier Bowl. For "We need a destination resort. It would be the only one we have on the beach with an ocean view. That area was declared a blight needs to start somewhere to have a firm economic base."-- Sally Jelsy, President of the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce Against "To lose our small-town indenity by razing historic structures would be a mistake.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a short-story writer, Jay Gummerman never knows where inspiration will turn up. With "Chez Chance," his first novel, it was hearing about a young Orange County phone company tree trimmer who was paralyzed in a fall from a palm tree after being startled by a rat. "It was something that when I heard it, I thought, 'That's a really horrible thing,' " says Gummerman, 38, of San Clemente. "Later on, it kind of percolated up to my writer's consciousness."
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early reviews of Michelle Latiolais' first novel, "Even Now," praise it for being "delicate" and "lyrically evocative" (Kirkus Reviews) as it probes "a common theme with new depth and without dreariness" (Booklist). But a mixed review in Publishers Weekly also describes the Costa Mesa writer's sensitively written novel about the struggles of a Northern California girl caught between her divorced parents as "slow-moving."
BOOKS
May 28, 1989
WE FIND OURSELVES IN MOONTOWN by Jay Gummerman (Alfred A. Knopf: $16.95; 175 pp.) "Anyone who lives in California and yearns to find good new writers will fall upon this book with glad cries . . . because of (Gummerman's) uncanny management of dialogue and the luminous texture of lives that the rest of us barely give a thought to."--Carolyn See AMERICAN GENESIS A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm by Thomas P. Hughes (Viking: $24.95; 349 pp.)
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
As a graduate student in UC Irvine's Program in Writing, Jay Gummerman was encouraged by some to write a novel rather than short stories. Publishers, conventional wisdom has it, are not particularly interested in story collections. And it's especially difficult to sell a collection of stories that have never appeared in print elsewhere, either in popular magazines or literary quarterlies. The San Clemente short story writer has proved conventional wisdom wrong. Gummerman's collection of 10 such stories, "We Find Ourselves in Moontown," has just been published by Knopf ($16.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1987
Robert Hilburn's review ("Icons of the '60s Paired on Tour," July 13) showcases his ignorance of the Grateful Dead's music and fans once again. First of all, he implies that because the Deadheads sang along with every song during the band's opening set, the Dead must have been playing their "greatest hits." What bunk! If the fans sing along on every song, maybe it's because they know every song. I'm sure this must not seem possible to Hilburn, who obviously views Deadheads as one huge acid casualty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 50 residents carrying signs reading "Save Our History" and "Don't Ruin Our Town" marched near the beach Saturday to protest a proposal to build a luxury resort near the San Clemente Pier. "People are really mad at this point," said Wayne Eggleston, a member of the newly established Pier Bowl Community Assn., which organized the demonstration. "Elections are coming up, and we're trying to make a public issue out of it."
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