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NEWS
June 8, 1989
Michael R. Deland, regional administrator in Boston for the Environmental Protection Agency, will be nominated as chairman of the President's Council on Environmental Quality, the White House announced. The selection of Deland, a 47-year-old lawyer who has gained a reputation as a strong enforcer of environmental laws, brought praise from several environmental groups. The three-member council was established in 1970 to advise the President on environmental matters and has few statutory powers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jay D. Hair, former head of the National Wildlife Federation, credited with transforming the group into the nation's largest grass-roots environmental organization and a powerful lobbying force, has died. He was 56. Hair died Friday in his home in suburban Seattle of bone-marrow cancer. During his tenure, from 1981 to 1995, Hair changed the organization from something of a conservative sportsmen's club to a 6-million-member group of activists focused on environmental reform.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARRISH, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist camels are sticking their noses into oil company tents. Two months ago, after the Alaska oil spill, Exxon agreed to add an environmentalist to its board. Then last week, California State Controller Gray Davis and New York City Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, as trustees of powerful retirement system investors, urged six other major oil companies to follow suit.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARRISH, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist camels are sticking their noses into oil company tents. Two months ago, after the Alaska oil spill, Exxon agreed to add an environmentalist to its board. Then last week, California State Controller Gray Davis and New York City Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, as trustees of powerful retirement system investors, urged six other major oil companies to follow suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jay D. Hair, former head of the National Wildlife Federation, credited with transforming the group into the nation's largest grass-roots environmental organization and a powerful lobbying force, has died. He was 56. Hair died Friday in his home in suburban Seattle of bone-marrow cancer. During his tenure, from 1981 to 1995, Hair changed the organization from something of a conservative sportsmen's club to a 6-million-member group of activists focused on environmental reform.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An exchange of stinging letters was made public after Exxon USA's resignation from the National Wildlife Federation's corporate advisory board. The federation's panel was formed to foster "frank and open discussions" between industry and the federation's leaders. But an Exxon official said the conservation group's actions regarding "the Valdez oil spill have failed to demonstrate any sense of objectivity or fairness."
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
Angry that President Bush has yet to visit the oil-stained beaches of Alaska's Prince William Sound, the National Wildlife Federation sent pieces of the fouled shoreline to the White House today. The environmental group delivered to Bush and leaders of his Administration zip-lock plastic bags containing blackened, slime-covered stones from a beach twice treated by Exxon after its disastrous oil spill six months ago. Each bag was labeled, "A Prince William Sound rock called 'clean' by Exxon."
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
For the second time in recent weeks, the Bush Administration put off issuing an interagency agreement Friday aimed at more clearly establishing guidelines for protecting wetlands, prompting criticism from environmentalists. The Environmental Protection Agency said in a statement that it was approving a 15-day extension for further discussions over the final wording of an agreement between the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Last month a decision was postponed for 30 days.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Election-year political foes George Bush and the Rev. Jesse Jackson exchanged compliments today at the White House, and Bush declared, "This wasn't a bury the hatchet meeting because no hatchet needed to be buried.' He said the two men have a "relationship that transcends politics." Jackson said the most important aspect of the meeting was the "openness by President-elect Bush to discuss a broad range of matters."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Exxon Corp., Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. and other defendants in more than 150 lawsuits resulting from the Exxon Valdez oil spill are asking that all evidence be kept secret until the cases go to trial. The order, requested earlier this month, has come under fire from the state and other plaintiffs, who contend that Alaska's legislative responsibilities and the public's right to know demand the release of such information.
NEWS
June 8, 1989
Michael R. Deland, regional administrator in Boston for the Environmental Protection Agency, will be nominated as chairman of the President's Council on Environmental Quality, the White House announced. The selection of Deland, a 47-year-old lawyer who has gained a reputation as a strong enforcer of environmental laws, brought praise from several environmental groups. The three-member council was established in 1970 to advise the President on environmental matters and has few statutory powers.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Newsday
EPA Administrator William K. Reilly criticized environmental activists Thursday, saying that they hurt their cause by being relentlessly critical of President Bush and White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu. As a result, Reilly said in an interview, environmentalists were excluded from a recent White House meeting with business and industry leaders to discuss the Clean Air Act.
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