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Jay Howell

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May 30, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Howell temporarily relinquished his role as the Dodgers' bullpen stopper Tuesday after a meeting with Manager Tom Lasorda. Howell said an agreement was reached that the Dodgers would not rush his comeback as long as he kept them informed of his ability to pitch. Howell had knee surgery April 24, then had 27 days of inactivity, and has been trying to come back ever since. The hastened comeback has resulted in stiffness in his right shoulder.
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SPORTS
July 19, 2008
Manager Joe Torre's record for the first half of the season is a mixed bag. The good: If you look close enough, you'll spot a faint halo over Torre's cap that intimidates The Times' piranhas (er, scribes). He handles pitchers well, plays "little ball" and surrounds himself with good baseball people. The bad: Changes course about as fast as an aircraft carrier. For example, popular Blake DeWitt stopped hitting over a month ago, yet Torre refuses to play potential slugger Andy LaRoche at third.
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SPORTS
March 14, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Dodger reliever Jay Howell, making only his third spring appearance for the Dodgers, was forced to leave Sunday's game against the Atlanta Braves with what was diagnosed as a sprained joint in his back. Dodger trainers said Howell, who had off-season elbow surgery before being acquired from the Oakland A's, suffered a mild sprain of the sacroiliac joint, which is located between the hipbone and the lower part of the spine. Howell's status is uncertain, and he will undergo X-rays today.
SPORTS
October 9, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Three thousand miles away, members of the Oakland Athletics rallied around Jay Howell Saturday, refusing to let pine tar smear the good name of their former teammate. "He is not a cheater," Oakland Manager Tony La Russa said of Howell, who played three seasons (1985-87) with the A's. "There has to be some explanation. Jay is a class act here--and in New York. I'll take him any time." Added Oakland pitcher Dave Stewart: "Jay doesn't need to cheat to win, if that's what they're trying to imply.
SPORTS
March 25, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
At this stage of spring training, performances and results of pitchers are scrutinized as much as their physical well-being, which is why Dodger relievers Jay Howell and Jesse Orosco wanted to feel and throw well here Thursday. Howell, coming off surgery on his right elbow, has had a sprained back, a tender right forearm and the flu this spring.
SPORTS
March 30, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Jay Howell was the only Dodger player wearing a white uniform instead of a blue pullover jersey here Tuesday, but that wasn't the only reason he stood out. Howell, the Dodgers' new right-handed short reliever, had agreed to pitch three innings for the Dodger triple-A team against Minnesota Twins minor leaguers. Howell was there, according to pitching coach Ron Perranoski, simply to log more work before the Dodgers leave today for Los Angeles.
SPORTS
August 23, 1987 | JEFF SKLANSKY, Associated Press
Jay Howell is not used to boos from the fans, barbs from the media and bone-chilling pain from his own pitches. The two-time All-Star reliever for the Oakland Athletics is wallowing in defeat while his team makes a serious run for the pennant, fighting to keep his ailing right elbow from ruining his season. With a 9.90 earned-run average in eight appearances since his last save on July 6, Howell says he is facing by far the toughest test of his five-year major-league career.
SPORTS
February 21, 1989 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Others will remember Oct. 8 as the day Dodger relief pitcher Jay Howell was discovered with pine tar in his glove. Jay Howell and his wife, Alison, will remember it for the phone call they received late that night in their New York hotel room, the call that finally made it through all the cranks and crackpots that were flooding the switchboard with abuse. It was the call informing Alison Howell that her father, Otto Quale, had died that day of cancer.
SPORTS
October 14, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
If making it to the World Series was not motivation enough for the underdog Dodgers, more was provided Thursday when veteran Don Baylor of the Oakland Athletics strongly criticized Dodger reliever Jay Howell in an interview published this morning in the San Jose Mercury News.
SPORTS
June 2, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Jay Howell is not ready to get upset over his lack of use since returning from the disabled list May 18. He has appeared in only three of 13 games since then, and in one save situation. He was removed from that save situation Monday night with a runner on first and two out in the ninth inning. John Candelaria retired Barry Bonds to collect the save.
SPORTS
May 9, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
After being favorably compared to his older brother during an impressive spring, Pedro Martinez has been showing his age at triple-A Albuquerque and will not be joining the major leagues in the near future. The younger Martinez has baffled the Dodgers with both his pitching and his work habits. Despite leading the Pacific Coast League with 37 strikeouts, Martinez is 2-2 with a 4.26 earned-run average and 19 walks in 38 innings.
SPORTS
March 29, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Kip Gross lowered his spring earned-run average to 2.08 Saturday, but it may not help his chances of making the team because, on the same field, Jay Howell was raising expectations. Shortly before Gross worked out of a bases-loaded, none-out jam to set up the Dodgers' 7-4 victory over the Atlanta Braves, Howell threw well enough to make the Dodgers say he could be ready in the first few days of this season.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Relief pitcher Jay Howell and infielders Jeff Hamilton and Mike Sharperson avoided arbitration hearings Thursday, agreeing to one-year contracts with the Dodgers. Howell signed for $2,575,000, Hamilton for $497,500. The figures on Sharperson's contract were not available. Howell had asked for $2.75 million against the Dodgers' offer of $2.4 million. Hamilton had asked for $545,000 and the Dodgers had offered $450,000. Sharperson wanted $675,000 and the Dodgers were offering $500,000.
SPORTS
December 20, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after Dodger management gave him the cold shoulder, second baseman Juan Samuel surprised some of his teammates Thursday when he returned for 1992 by accepting the club's arbitration offer. Jay Howell, as expected, also accepted, giving the Dodgers two familiar faces amid much youth and uncertainty. "Well, it's nice to be able to have some of our team back together," outfielder Brett Butler said with a laugh.
SPORTS
July 16, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
At 6 feet 3 inches and 205 pounds--blond, blue-eyed and baby-faced--Jay Canfield Howell resembles a larger Robert Redford playing Roy Hobbs in "The Natural." The similarity is there even as Howell prepares to save another game for the Oakland A's, his eyes taking on the same look of penetrating determination that Hobbs displayed as he prepared to save the Knights for Pop Fisher.
SPORTS
May 19, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never one to rest on his milestones, Rick Dempsey put his four-decade career in perspective earlier this week. "It seems like four decades since I've started back-to-back games," he said. It may not seem that way for long. In only his fourth start of the season Friday, the backup catcher forced the Dodgers to give this old man one more good look.
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