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Jay Johnstone

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April 12, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Defying time, gravity and order in the cosmos, the Moon Man has landed in Los Angeles once again, laughing all the way. The homecoming may be short-lived--alien forces could propel him back into orbit at any time--but Jay Johnstone is as likely to pass unnoticed as a supernova. Unless, of course, he arrives incognito for today's home opener, grabs a rake and sweeps the Dodger Stadium infield, as he and his partner in pranks, Jerry Reuss, did on Johnstone's last go-round here.
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January 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former baseball player Jay Johnstone sued CBS, NBC and United Press International in Los Angeles County Superior Court for slander and libel, alleging they got the facts of his probation wrong and hurt his income. Last year, Johnstone was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation and ordered to pay a $300 fine and $50 restitution to the Price Club, where employees accused him of shoplifting, according to court papers.
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January 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former major league outfielder Jay Johnstone was fined $270 in connection with a struggle in a grocery store parking lot.
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February 21, 1985
Free-agent outfielder Jay Johnstone has been signed to a one-year contract by the Dodgers, the team announced Wednesday. Contract terms were not released. Johnstone, 38, was with the Dodgers in 1980-82. He played 52 games for the Chicago Cubs in 1984 and hit .288 with no home runs and three runs batted in before being designated for assignment Aug. 31. The 16-year veteran, who has a .
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August 31, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Jay Johnstone has been banned from Dodger Stadium. Not Johnstone, the ballplayer. He remains on the disabled list, which he has occupied for all but nine at-bats this season. Johnstone, the author, however, has been told to set up shop elsewhere. Johnstone's book, "Temporary Insanity," which he wrote with Daily News columnist Rick Talley, will no longer be sold at Dodger Stadium novelty stands, by order of Fred Claire, the team's executive vice president. Apparently, it's a matter of taste.
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August 11, 1985 | Jim Murray
I once wrote that you went a long way toward understanding Jay Johnstone, the ballplayer, if you began with the fact he started out life rooming with Jimmy Piersall. Piersall was immediately outraged. "Johnstone was already crazy before I met him!" he shrieked. Their manager that year, Bill Rigney, had a simple explanation of why he had paired the game's resident flakes. "I didn't want to screw up two rooms," he said. The beauty of Jay Johnstone, Danny Ozark once said, is he thinks he's normal.
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October 11, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Jay Johnstone, the 25th player on the 25-man Dodger roster, hasn't played yet, but he may be leading the team in getting his face seen. For example: --He's writing a daily newspaper column in which his mug accompanies each story. --He's appearing on a nightly newscast, analyzing games he never plays in. How's he dealing with this important role? "It gives me something to do, and I get to watch a great team play," Johnstone said, presumably refering to the Dodgers.
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April 4, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
With four exhibition games left, Jay Johnstone is still 0 for spring. "I remember when Ron Fairly didn't get a hit all spring and he batted .330 that year," Manager Tom Lasorda said. So does that mean the Dodgers can expect Johnstone to hit .330 in 1985? "I didn't say that," Lasorda said. The Dodgers would probably be happy if Johnstone just hits more than his weight, which is about the same as the team's pinch-hitting average last season, .184.
SPORTS
October 11, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Jay Johnstone, the 25th player on the 25-man Dodger roster, hasn't played yet, but he may be leading the team in getting his face seen. For example: --He's writing a daily newspaper column in which his mug accompanies each story. --He's appearing on a nightly newscast, analyzing games he never plays in. How's he dealing with this important role? "It gives me something to do, and I get to watch a great team play," Johnstone said, presumably refering to the Dodgers.
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September 3, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Jay Johnstone, the Dodgers' king of comedy, played straight man for the first time in months Monday and delivered the first big punch line of September, an 11th-inning pinch single that produced temporary insanity at Dodger Stadium, not to mention a 5-4 win over the Montreal Expos that ended a four-game losing streak before a sellout crowd of 47,496. Johnstone, who had a home with the Dodgers as long as there was a place on the disabled list, was activated on Sunday.
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August 31, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Jay Johnstone has been banned from Dodger Stadium. Not Johnstone, the ballplayer. He remains on the disabled list, which he has occupied for all but nine at-bats this season. Johnstone, the author, however, has been told to set up shop elsewhere. Johnstone's book, "Temporary Insanity," which he wrote with Daily News columnist Rick Talley, will no longer be sold at Dodger Stadium novelty stands, by order of Fred Claire, the team's executive vice president. Apparently, it's a matter of taste.
SPORTS
August 11, 1985 | Jim Murray
I once wrote that you went a long way toward understanding Jay Johnstone, the ballplayer, if you began with the fact he started out life rooming with Jimmy Piersall. Piersall was immediately outraged. "Johnstone was already crazy before I met him!" he shrieked. Their manager that year, Bill Rigney, had a simple explanation of why he had paired the game's resident flakes. "I didn't want to screw up two rooms," he said. The beauty of Jay Johnstone, Danny Ozark once said, is he thinks he's normal.
SPORTS
April 12, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Defying time, gravity and order in the cosmos, the Moon Man has landed in Los Angeles once again, laughing all the way. The homecoming may be short-lived--alien forces could propel him back into orbit at any time--but Jay Johnstone is as likely to pass unnoticed as a supernova. Unless, of course, he arrives incognito for today's home opener, grabs a rake and sweeps the Dodger Stadium infield, as he and his partner in pranks, Jerry Reuss, did on Johnstone's last go-round here.
SPORTS
April 4, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
With four exhibition games left, Jay Johnstone is still 0 for spring. "I remember when Ron Fairly didn't get a hit all spring and he batted .330 that year," Manager Tom Lasorda said. So does that mean the Dodgers can expect Johnstone to hit .330 in 1985? "I didn't say that," Lasorda said. The Dodgers would probably be happy if Johnstone just hits more than his weight, which is about the same as the team's pinch-hitting average last season, .184.
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